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Word 2000 in a Nutshell by Walter Glenn

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Chapter 10. Table

Tables are one of Word’s most powerful features, used both to organize information and to lay out documents. A table is a container holding any number of cells arranged in rows and columns (Figure 10-1). Tables get special treatment from Word. They can be created or resized like graphics, but the cells in the table can hold text, graphics, fields, and other types of objects — even other tables.

Viewing the special formatting marks in a table

Figure 10-1. Viewing the special formatting marks in a table

Word uses a number of special formatting marks to identify a table and its parts:

  • Move handle. Hold the pointer over the table for about two seconds to make the move and resize handles appear (shown in the top left corner of Figure 10-1). Click and drag the move handle to move the table around in the document (this works for all Word views except for Normal view).

  • Resize handle. Click this handle to turn the pointer into a double-headed arrow. Drag the handle to resize the table.

  • End of cell mark. Turn on the Show/Hide feature on the Standard toolbar to show end of cell and row marks on a table. End of cell marks are nonprinting characters that denote the end of a cell and are shown only by using the Show/Hide command.

  • End of row mark. End of row marks are nonprinting characters that denote the end of a row and are shown only by using the Show/Hide command.

Several other marks exist, depending on the view that’s ...

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