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XML and SQL: Developing Web Applications

Book Description

"Dan's book provides something that the formal standards and development manuals sorely lack: a context that helps developers understand how to use XML in their own projects."
--Tim Kientzle, Independent Software Consultant

XML and SQL: Developing Web Applications is a guide for Web developers and database programmers interested in building robust XML applications backed by SQL databases. It makes it easier than ever for Web developers to create and manage scalable database applications optimized for the Internet.

The author offers an understanding of the many advantages of both XML and SQL and provides practical information and techniques for utilizing the best of both systems. The book explores the stages of application development step by step, featuring a real-world perspective and many examples of when and how each technology is most effective.

Specific topics covered include:

  • Project definition for a data-oriented application

  • Creating a bullet-proof data model

  • DTDs (document type definitions) and the design of XML documents

  • When to use XML, and what parts of your data should remain purely relational

  • Related standards, such as XSLT and XML Schema

  • How to use the XML support incorporated into Microsoft's SQL Server™ 2000

  • The XML-specific features of J2EE™ (Java™ 2 Enterprise Edition)

  • Throughout this book, numerous concrete examples illustrate how to use each of these powerful technologies to circumvent the other's limitations. If you want to use the best part of XML and SQL to create robust, data-centric systems then there is no better resource than this book.



    0201657961B10152001

    Table of Contents

    1. Copyright
    2. Introduction
    3. Acknowledgments
    4. About the Author
    5. Why XML?
      1. The Lesson of SGML
      2. What About XML?
      3. Why HTML Is Not the Answer
      4. The Basics of XML
      5. Why You Don't Need to Throw Away Your RDBMS
      6. A Brief Example
      7. Great! How Do I Get Started?
      8. Summary
    6. Introducing XML and SQL: A History Lesson of Sorts
      1. Extensible Markup Language (XML)
      2. Structured Query Language (SQL)
      3. Fitting It All Together
      4. Summary
    7. Project Definition and Management
      1. An Illustrative Anecdote
      2. How to Capture Requirements
      3. CyberCinema: The Adventure Begins
      4. Requirements Gathering
      5. Functional Requirements Document
      6. Quality Assurance
      7. Project Management
      8. The Technical Specification Document
      9. Summary
    8. Data Modeling
      1. Getting Data-Centric
      2. Roll Film: Back to CyberCinema
      3. Summary
    9. XML Design
      1. Carving Your Rosetta Stone
      2. Where Is the DTD Used?
      3. When to Use XML and When Not to Use It
      4. Building a DTD
      5. CyberCinema: The Rosetta Stone Meets the Web
      6. Summary
    10. Getting Relational: Database Schema Design
      1. Knowing When to Let Go
      2. First Steps
      3. Decomposing CyberCinema
      4. Summary
    11. Related Standards: XSLT, XML Schema, and Other Flora and Fauna
      1. XSLT: XML Transformers!
      2. So How Does XSLT Work Exactly?
      3. XML Schema: An Alternative to DTDs
      4. Querying XML Documents
      5. XML Query
      6. SQLX: The Truth Is Out There
      7. Summary
    12. XML and SQL Server 2000
      1. Retrieving Data in XML Format
      2. Communicating with SQL Server over the Web
      3. Retrieving Data in XML Format—Continued
      4. Defining XML Views
      5. Let SQL Server Do the Work
      6. Working with XML Documents
      7. Summary
    13. Java Programming with XML and SQL
      1. Dealing with XML in Java
      2. JDBC, JNDI, and EJBs
      3. J2EE Application Servers
      4. Summary
    14. More Examples: Beyond Silly Web Sites
      1. Building a Web Service
      2. E-Commerce
      3. Taxonomical Structure
      4. Document Management and Content Locking
      5. Versioning and Change Management
      6. Summary
    15. Appendix
    16. Bibliography
      1. Books
      2. Web Sites