O'Reilly logo

Xcode® 4 by Richard Wentk

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 14: Using Version Control

In This Chapter

Introducing Source Control Management (SCM) Using manual version control Using snapshots Introducing SCM with Git Using Git locally in Xcode Using Xcode with GitHub

Development isn't always a smooth process, and sometimes it's necessary to abandon code that isn't working and restore a project to a previous state. It also can be useful to compare older and newer versions and to use tools that manage development across a team.

Managing code in these ways is known as version control or source control management (SCM). Several version control tools are built into Xcode. They're not obligatory, so you can ignore them, but this isn't recommended. At a minimum, you can manage versions manually in Finder. But you also can use the more powerful tools that are new to Xcode 4.

Using Manual Version Control

The easiest way to manage versions is to duplicate and rename project folders in Finder, as shown in Figure 14.1. Each folder should contain stable or nearly stable code with a consistent set of features. The code should build cleanly.

Create a copy before you begin to add new versions. If it's obvious that the next version must be abandoned, you can mark it by giving the folder a unique name—perhaps one that includes the word “abandoned”—and starting again with a new copy.

Figure 14.1

Manual version control is simple and easy to use, but limited.

Manual version control is ideal for simple, self-contained projects, such as apps. ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required