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Workforce Asset Management Book of Knowledge

Book Description

The official study guide for the Workforce Management Technology Certification, containing core knowledge for time and labor management

The worldwide standard for the time and labor management technology profession, Workforce Asset Management Book of Knowledge is the official guide to the Workforce Asset Management Certification. Establishing a common lexicon within the profession for talking about workforce management and systems, this essential guide is designed to establish a body of generally accepted and applicable practices and standards within the industry.

  • Includes contributions from leaders in the field

  • Covers everything from vendor and product selection, to implementation planning and execution, system design, testing and change control, financial analytics, fundamentals of scheduling people against workload and skill sets, and how to use these systems to manage labor costs and productivity

  • Body of knowledge is focused on workers and technologies for every industry and every type of employer

  • Designed around timekeeping and labor scheduling technologies

With contributions from leaders in the field, this book expertly covers the knowledge, practices, regulations, and technologies within the domain of workforce management systems. It provides the body of knowledge for managing a workforce using time and attendance systems, labor scheduling, productivity, staffing budgets, workforce software applications, or data, compensation and benefits for payroll and human resources.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Series
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Foreword
  6. Preface
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. Introduction
  9. Unit One: Groundwork for Workforce Asset Management
    1. Chapter One: Introduction and Background
      1. 1.1 WORKFORCE ASSET MANAGEMENT: A CROSS-DISCIPLINARY SPECIALTY
      2. 1.2 INCREASING BUSINESS NEED FOR WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY
      3. 1.3 EVOLUTION OF WORKFORCE ASSET MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY
      4. NOTES
    2. Chapter Two: Principles of Workforce Asset Management
      1. 2.1 THE A.C.T.I.V.E. PRINCIPLES
      2. 2.2 SUSTAINING THE WAM STRATEGIC VISION
      3. 2.3 A NEW MODEL: WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE
  10. Unit Two: The Framework for the Organization
    1. Chapter Three: Changing the Organization
      1. 3.1 DEVELOPING THE BUSINESS CASE
      2. 3.2 FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RETURN ON INVESTMENT
      3. 3.3 FINANCING WORKFORCE ASSET MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY
      4. 3.4 NEGOTIATION
      5. NOTES
    2. Chapter Four: Impact of Organizational Readiness, Maturity, and Integrity on WFM Systems
      1. 4.1 ORGANIZATIONAL READINESS AND KEEPING PEOPLE ENGAGED
      2. 4.2 WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT MATURITY CURVE
      3. 4.3 BENCHMARKING AND BASELINING DATA
      4. 4.4 THE RELEVANCE OF WORKPLACE INTEGRITY IN SYSTEM OPERABILITY
      5. NOTES
  11. Unit Three: Timekeeping
    1. Chapter Five: Workforce Management Devices and Functionality
      1. 5.1 TIMECARD FUNCTIONALITY
      2. 5.2 ACCRUAL RULES
      3. 5.3 AUTOMATED WORKFLOW AND EMPLOYEE SELF-SERVICE
      4. 5.4 DATA COLLECTION: WHO, WHERE, AND WHEN
      5. 5.5 BIOMETRICS: FEATURES AND FUNCTIONALITY
      6. 5.6 MOBILE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: FEATURES AND FUNCTIONALITY
      7. NOTES
    2. Chapter Six: Federal Regulation
      1. 6.1 FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT
      2. 6.2 DEFINING THE LEGAL WORKWEEK
      3. 6.3 CHANGING THE WORKWEEK
      4. 6.4 HANDLING MULTIPLE RATES OF PAY FOR HOURLY WORKERS
      5. 6.5 DEFINITION OF HOURS WORKED
      6. 6.6 TRACKING HOURS WORKED
      7. NOTES
    3. Chapter Seven: State Regulation
      1. 7.1 STATE WAGE AND HOUR GUIDELINES
      2. 7.2 WAGE ORDERS
      3. 7.3 DEFINITION OF OVERTIME
      4. 7.4 DEFINITION OF WORKWEEK AND WORKDAY
      5. 7.5 FREQUENCY OF WAGE PAYMENTS
      6. 7.6 MEAL PERIODS
      7. 7.7 REST PERIOD
      8. 7.8 DEFINITION OF HOURS WORKED
      9. 7.9 TRACKING HOURS WORKED
      10. NOTES
    4. Chapter Eight: Compliance, Controls, Reporting, and Payroll Leakage
      1. 8.1 DESIGNING LEGALLY DEFENSIBLE SYSTEMS AND POLICIES
      2. 8.2 MANAGING ROLES WITHIN WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
      3. 8.3 UNIQUE ASPECTS OF TIMEKEEPING SECURITY AND CONTROL CONFIGURATION
      4. 8.4 RECORD-KEEPING REGULATIONS
      5. 8.5 LEGAL AND STATISTICAL ISSUES
      6. 8.6 SSAE 16, SOC2, ISO, AND SOX
      7. 8.7 INTEGRATION WITH REPORTING STRUCTURES AND BUSINESS SYSTEMS
      8. 8.8 FRAUD, ABUSE, AND PAYROLL LEAKAGE
      9. NOTES
    5. Chapter Nine: Industry-Specific Workforce Management Business Needs
      1. 9.1 REGULATIONS AND RECOMMENDED PRACTICES ON FITNESS FOR DUTY AND FATIGUE RISK MITIGATION
      2. 9.2 HEALTHCARE PAY PRACTICES
      3. 9.3 RETAIL AND RESTAURANT INDUSTRY
      4. 9.4 GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING
      5. 9.5 K–12 EDUCATION INDUSTRY
      6. 9.6 MANAGING A GLOBAL WORKFORCE
      7. NOTES
  12. Unit Four: Scheduling and Labor Management
    1. Chapter Ten: Scheduling Drivers and Design
      1. 10.1 WORKLOAD
      2. 10.2 RULES AND CONSTRAINTS
      3. 10.3 WORKFORCE
      4. 10.4 SCHEDULING PROCESS
      5. 10.5 SCHEDULING SOFTWARE
      6. 10.6 INDUSTRY SPECIFICS
    2. Chapter Eleven: Scheduling, Attendance, and Leave—Categories and Configurations
      1. 11.1 TYPES OF EMPLOYEES
      2. 11.2 THREE TYPES OF ABSENCES
      3. 11.3 LEAVE MANAGEMENT POLICY
      4. 11.4 HUMAN RESOURCES ATTENDANCE POLICY FUNDAMENTALS
      5. 11.5 CONFIGURING ATTENDANCE POLICY IN TIMEKEEPING AND SCHEDULING
      6. NOTES
    3. Chapter Twelve: New Scheduling Models for the Workforce
      1. 12.1 NEW MODELS FOR SCHEDULING GREATER WORK-LIFE FIT
      2. 12.2 DEMAND-DRIVEN LABOR SCHEDULING
      3. 12.3 SCHEDULE OPTIMIZATION: POSITIONING TIME AS A RESOURCE AT THE LOCAL LEVEL
      4. 12.4 WORKPLACE FLEXIBILITY RELATED TO PEOPLE WITH COMPLEX EMPLOYMENT SITUATIONS
      5. 12.5 SCHEDULING AS A FORM OF COMPENSATION AND RETENTION
      6. NOTES
    4. Chapter Thirteen: Scheduling in Highly Complex Industries and Areas
      1. 13.1 MANAGING OVERTIME: A COMMON CHALLENGE IN THE WORKPLACE, ESPECIALLY IN HEALTHCARE
      2. 13.2 MANUFACTURING, MINING, AND ENERGY
      3. 13.3 EDUCATION
      4. 13.4 CORRECTIONS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT
      5. NOTES
  13. Unit Five: Analytics, Data, and Integration
    1. Chapter Fourteen: Workforce Analytics
      1. 14.1 SETTING THE STAGE FOR ANALYTICS
      2. 14.2 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATA ANALYSIS
      3. 14.3 FORMAL MODELING APPROACHES
      4. 14.4 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS USED BY WFM SYSTEMS
      5. NOTES
    2. Chapter Fifteen: Data Integration and Interfaces
      1. 15.1 GETTING DATA IN AND OUT
      2. 15.2 GENERAL PRACTICES
      3. 15.3 INTERFACE PROJECT FLOW: MILESTONES
      4. 15.4 PRIMARY INTERFACES FOR WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
      5. 15.5 INTERFACE TIMING
      6. 15.6 OBTAINING, TRANSFERRING, AND DELIVERING DATA
      7. 15.7 WORKING ENVIRONMENTS AND RAW DATA ARCHIVING
      8. 15.8 AUTOMATION/UNATTENDED OPERATION
      9. NOTES
    3. Chapter Sixteen: Data and Systems Management
      1. 16.1 DATA GOVERNANCE
      2. 16.2 PRIVACY AND SECURITY
      3. 16.3 WHERE DATA SHOULD ORIGINATE AND WHAT DATA SHOULD BE SHARED
      4. 16.4 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: ARCHITECTURE, SCALABILITY, PERFORMANCE, PORTALS, DISASTER PLANNING, VIRTUAL MACHINES, CLOUD COMPUTING, HOSTED VERSUS IN-HOUSE
      5. 16.5 MANAGING PERFORMANCE OF A GROWING DATABASE
      6. 16.6 DATA MIGRATION MANAGEMENT
      7. 16.7 GUIDELINES FOR DATA STORAGE/RETRIEVAL: ARCHIVING, DELETING, BACKING UP, AND RESTORING
      8. 16.8 RESOURCE CONSIDERATIONS FOR DATA AND SYSTEM MANAGEMENT
      9. FURTHER READING
      10. NOTES
  14. Unit Six: Project Implementation and Support
    1. Chapter Seventeen: Project Management for Workforce Asset Management Implementation
      1. 17.1 INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT
      2. 17.2 DEFINITION OF A PROJECT
      3. 17.3 ROLES AND FUNCTIONS OF A WAM PROJECT MANAGER
      4. 17.4 FOCUS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT: TIME, COSTS, QUALITY, AND THE BALANCE AMONG THE THREE
      5. 17.5 APPLIED METHODOLOGY
      6. NOTES
    2. Chapter Eighteen: Requirements Gathering and Analysis for Workforce Asset Management
      1. 18.1 BUSINESS ANALYST
      2. 18.2 SYSTEMS ANALYST
      3. 18.3 WHAT CAN THE BUSINESS ANALYST TEACH THE WAM-PRO?
      4. 18.4 DOCUMENTS OF THE BUSINESS ANALYST
      5. 18.5 BUSINESS ANALYSIS PROCESSES FOR WFM REQUIREMENTS AND SOLUTION SELECTION
      6. 18.6 KEY POINTS
      7. NOTES
    3. Chapter Nineteen: Vendor and System Selection for Workforce Asset Management Systems
      1. 19.1 REVIEW OF THE OVERALL VENDOR SELECTION PROCESS
      2. 19.2 SOME DOS AND DON'TS FOR VENDOR SELECTION
    4. Chapter Twenty: Design Reviews for New Methodology, Technology, and Processes
      1. 20.1 DESIGN REVIEW MODELS
      2. 20.2 SYSTEM MISSION HIERARCHY
      3. 20.3 TYPES OF DESIGN REVIEW
      4. 20.4 ROLE OF THE DESIGN WORKBOOK IN DESIGN REVIEWS
    5. Chapter Twenty-One: Implementation of the Workforce Management System
      1. 21.1 ELEMENTS OF IMPLEMENTATION
      2. 21.2 SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION SUBPHASE
      3. 21.3 SYSTEMS DELIVERY SUBPHASE
      4. 21.4 PITFALLS OF IMPLEMENTATION
      5. 21.5 SETTING UP AND OPERATING A TECHNOLOGY HELP DESK
    6. Chapter Twenty-Two: Testing and Quality Assurance for Workforce Management Systems
      1. 22.1 TESTING AND QUALITY ASSURANCE ON WFM SYSTEMS BEFORE RELEASE TO OPERATIONS
    7. Chapter Twenty-Three: Sustaining the Desired Future State and Training for Successful Workforce Asset Management
      1. 23.1 MANAGING SYSTEM USABILITY
      2. 23.2 WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY TRAINING
  15. Glossary
  16. About the Editor
  17. About the Contributors
  18. Index