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Wireless Networking Complete

Book Description

Given the explosion of new wireless communications techniques and the host of wireless network technologies and applications currently available or on the drawing board, it is safe to say that we are in the midst of a wireless networking revolution. Industry adoption of next-generation specifications will provide a substantial boost to the market for wireless multimedia networking, prompting growth in excess of 50 million wireless network devices by 2010, according to a market study by Parks Associates.

A compilation of critical content from key MK titles published in recent years on wireless networking and communications. Individual chapters are organized as one complete reference that allows it to be used as a 360-degree view from our bestselling authors for those interested in new and developing aspects of wireless network technology.



  • Chapters contributed by recognized experts in the field cover theory and practice of wireless network technology, allowing the reader to develop a new level of knowledge and technical expertise
  • Up-to-date coverage of wireless networking issues facilitates learning and lets the reader remain current and fully informed from multiple viewpoints
  • Presents methods of analysis and problem-solving techniques, enhancing the reader’s grasp of the material and ability to implement practical solutions

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Networking
  3. About This Book
  4. About the Authors
  5. 1. Supporting Wireless Technologies
    1. 1.1. The Frequency Spectrum
      1. 1.1.1. Public Media Broadcasting
      2. 1.1.2. Cellular Communication
      3. 1.1.3. Wireless Data Communication
      4. 1.1.4. Other Fixed or Mobile Wireless Communications
    2. 1.2. Wireless Communication Primer
      1. 1.2.1. Signal Propagation
        1. 1.2.1.1. Attenuation
        2. 1.2.1.2. Noise
        3. 1.2.1.3. Multipath Propagation
      2. 1.2.2. Modulation
        1. 1.2.2.1. Amplitude Modulation
        2. 1.2.2.2. Frequency Modulation
        3. 1.2.2.3. Phase Modulation
      3. 1.2.3. Multiplexing
        1. 1.2.3.1. Frequency-Division Multiplexing
        2. 1.2.3.2. Time-Division Multiplexing
        3. 1.2.3.3. Code-Division Multiplexing
    3. 1.3. Spread Spectrum
      1. 1.3.1. Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum
      2. 1.3.2. Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum
      3. 1.3.3. Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing
    4. 1.4. Global System for Mobile and General Packet Radio Service
      1. 1.4.1. Global System for Mobile
        1. 1.4.1.1. GSM Network Architecture
        2. 1.4.1.2. Location Area Update
        3. 1.4.1.3. Call Routing
        4. 1.4.1.4. Handoff
      2. 1.4.2. General Packet Radio Service
        1. 1.4.2.1. Packet Switching
        2. 1.4.2.2. GPRS Architecture
        3. 1.4.2.3. GPRS Services
        4. 1.4.2.4. GPRS Terminals
        5. 1.4.2.5. Packet Data Protocol Context
        6. 1.4.2.6. Enhanced Data Rates for Global Evolution
        7. 1.4.2.7. High-Speed, Circuit-Switched Data
    5. 1.5. Code-Division Multiple Access
      1. 1.5.1. Code-Division Multiple Access Concept
      2. 1.5.2. IS-95
      3. 1.5.3. Software Handoff
      4. 1.5.4. Road to 4G
    6. 1.6. GSM Versus CDMA
    7. 1.7. 3G Cellular Systems
      1. 1.7.1. UMTS/WCDMA Versus cdma2000
      2. 1.7.2. UMTS/WCDMA
      3. 1.7.3. cdma2000
      4. 1.7.4. 4G Cellular Systems
    8. 1.8. 2G Mobile Wireless Services
      1. 1.8.1. WAP and iMode
      2. 1.8.2. Short Message Service
    9. 1.9. Wireless Technologies Landscape
    10. 1.10. 802.11 Wireless LANs
      1. 1.10.1. Architecture and Protocols
      2. 1.10.2. Frame Format
      3. 1.10.3. Beacon Frame
      4. 1.10.4. Roaming in a Wireless LAN
      5. 1.10.5. IEEE 802.11 Family
      6. 1.10.6. Security in Wireless LANs
    11. 1.11. Bluetooth
      1. 1.11.1. Architecture and Protocols
      2. 1.11.2. Bluetooth Overview
      3. 1.11.3. Bluetooth Architecture
      4. 1.11.4. Radio and Baseband
      5. 1.11.5. L2CAP and Frame Format
      6. 1.11.6. RFCOMM
      7. 1.11.7. SDP
      8. 1.11.8. Bluetooth Evolution
    12. 1.12. Ultra-Wideband
      1. 1.12.1. UWB Standards
      2. 1.12.2. UWB Applications
    13. 1.13. Radio-Frequency Identification
      1. 1.13.1. RFID System
      2. 1.13.2. RFID Applications
    14. 1.14. Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks
      1. 1.14.1. Wireless Broadband: IEEE 802.16
      2. 1.14.2. WiMax
    15. 1.15. Satellite
      1. 1.15.1. Satellite Communication
      2. 1.15.2. Satellite Systems
    16. 1.16. Wireless Sensor Networks
      1. 1.16.1. WSN Applications
        1. 1.16.1.1. Environmental Sensing
        2. 1.16.1.2. Object Sensing
        3. 1.16.1.3. Sensing with Intelligence
      2. 1.16.2. Wireless Sensor Node
      3. 1.16.3. Self-Organized Networks
      4. 1.16.4. ZigBee
    17. 1.17. Standardization in the Wireless World
      1. 1.17.1. Cellular Standard Groups
      2. 1.17.2. IEEE Standards
      3. 1.17.3. Standards War
    18. 1.18. Summary
    19. Further Reading
    20. References
  6. 2. Wireless Networks
    1. 2.1. Bluetooth (802.15.1)
    2. 2.2. Wi-Fi (802.11)
      1. 2.2.1. Physical Properties
      2. 2.2.2. Collision Avoidance
      3. 2.2.3. Distribution System
      4. 2.2.4. Frame Format
    3. 2.3. WiMAX (802.16)
    4. 2.4. Cell Phone Technologies
    5. Further Reading
  7. 3. An Overview of Wireless Systems
    1. 3.1. Introduction
    2. 3.2. First- and Second-Generation Cellular Systems
    3. 3.3. Cellular Communications from 1G to 3G
    4. 3.4. Road Map for Higher Data Rate Capability in 3G
    5. 3.5. Wireless 4G Systems
    6. 3.6. Future Wireless Networks
    7. 3.7. Standardization Activities for Cellular Systems
    8. 3.8. Summary
    9. Problems
    10. References
  8. 4. Wireless Application Protocol
    1. 4.1. Introduction
    2. 4.2. WAP and the World Wide Web (WWW)
    3. 4.3. Introduction to Wireless Application Protocol
    4. 4.4. The WAP Programming Model
      1. 4.4.1. The WWW Model
      2. 4.4.2. The WAP Model
    5. 4.5. WAP Architecture
      1. 4.5.1. Wireless Application Environment
      2. 4.5.2. Wireless Telephony Application
      3. 4.5.3. Wireless Session Protocol
      4. 4.5.4. Wireless Transaction Protocol
      5. 4.5.5. Wireless Transport Layer Security
      6. 4.5.6. Wireless Datagram Protocol
      7. 4.5.7. Optimal WAP Bearers
    6. 4.6. Traditional WAP Networking Environment
    7. 4.7. WAP Advantages and Disadvantages
    8. 4.8. Applications of WAP
    9. 4.9. imode
    10. 4.10. imode Versus WAP
    11. 4.11. Summary
    12. Problems
    13. References
  9. 5. Wireless Local Area Networks
    1. 5.1. Introduction
    2. 5.2. WLAN Equipment
    3. 5.3. WLAN Topologies
    4. 5.4. WLAN Technologies
      1. 5.4.1. IR Technology
      2. 5.4.2. UHF Narrowband Technology
      3. 5.4.3. Spread Spectrum Technology
    5. 5.5. IEEE 802.11 WLAN
      1. 5.5.1. IEEE 802.11 Architecture
      2. 5.5.2. 802.11 Physical Layer (PHY)
        1. 5.5.2.1. DSSS PHY
        2. 5.5.2.2. FHSS PHY
        3. 5.5.2.3. 802.11a—Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing (OFDM)
      3. 5.5.3. IEEE 802.11 Data Link Layer
      4. 5.5.4. IEEE 802.11 Medium Access Control
        1. 5.5.4.1. Exponential Backoff Algorithm
        2. 5.5.4.2. Hidden and Exposed Node Problem
      5. 5.5.5. IEEE 802.11 MAC Sublayer
    6. 5.6. Joining an Existing Basic Service Set
    7. 5.7. Security of IEEE 802.11 Systems
    8. 5.8. Power Management
    9. 5.9. IEEE 802.11b—High-Rate DSSS
    10. 5.10. IEEE 802.11n
    11. 5.11. Other WLAN Standards
      1. 5.11.1. HIPERLAN Family of Standards
        1. 5.11.1.1. QoS in HIPERLAN/2
      2. 5.11.2. Multimedia Access Communication—High-Speed Wireless Access Network
    12. 5.12. Performance of a Bluetooth Piconet in the Presence of IEEE 802.11 WLANs
      1. 5.12.1. Packet Error Rate (PER) from N Neighboring Bluetooth Piconets
      2. 5.12.2. PER from M Neighboring IEEE 802.11 WLANs
      3. 5.12.3. Aggregated Throughput
    13. 5.13. Interference Between Bluetooth and IEEE 802.11
    14. 5.14. IEEE 802.16
    15. 5.15. World Interoperability for MicroAccess, Inc. (WiMAX)
      1. 5.15.1. WiMAX PHY
      2. 5.15.2. WiMAX Media Access Control (MAC)
      3. 5.15.3. Spectrum Allocation for WiMAX
    16. 5.16. Summary
    17. Problems
    18. References
  10. 6. Fourth-Generation Systems and New Wireless Technologies
    1. 6.1. Introduction
    2. 6.2. 4G Vision
    3. 6.3. 4G Features and Challenges
    4. 6.4. Applications of 4G
    5. 6.5. 4G Technologies
      1. 6.5.1. Multicarrier Modulation
      2. 6.5.2. Smart Antenna Techniques
        1. 6.5.2.1. Single-Input, Single-Output
        2. 6.5.2.2. Single-Input, Multiple-Output
        3. 6.5.2.3. Multiple-Input, Single-Output
        4. 6.5.2.4. Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output
      3. 6.5.3. OFDM–MIMO Systems
      4. 6.5.4. Adaptive Modulation and Coding with Time-Slot Scheduler
      5. 6.5.5. Bell Labs Layered Space Time (BLAST) System
        1. 6.5.5.1. Transmitter
        2. 6.5.5.2. Receiver
        3. 6.5.5.3. Model
        4. 6.5.5.4. Signal Processing Algorithm
        5. 6.5.5.5. Implementation
      6. 6.5.6. Software-Defined Radio
      7. 6.5.7. Cognitive Radio
    6. 6.6. Summary
    7. Problems
    8. References
  11. 7. Mesh Networks: Optimal Routing and Scheduling
    1. 7.1. Overview
    2. 7.2. Network Topology and Link Activation Constraints
      1. 7.2.1. Link Activation Constraints
    3. 7.3. Link Scheduling and Schedulable Region
      1. 7.3.1. Stability of Queues
      2. 7.3.2. Link Flows and Link Stability Region
    4. 7.4. Routing and Scheduling a Given Flow Vector
    5. 7.5. Discussion
    6. 7.6. Maximum Weight Scheduling
      1. 7.6.1. Multicommodity Flow Criteria
      2. 7.6.2. Lyapunov Stability of a Network of Queues
      3. 7.6.3. The Algorithm and Its Analysis
      4. 7.6.4. Discussion
    7. 7.7. Routing and Scheduling for Elastic Traffic
      1. 7.7.1. Fair Allocation for Single Hop Flows
      2. 7.7.2. Fair Allocation for Multihop Flows
    8. 7.8. Discussion
    9. 7.9. Notes on the Literature
    10. Problems
    11. References
  12. 8. Ad Hoc Wireless Sensor Networks
    1. 8.1. Overview
    2. 8.2. Communication Coverage
    3. 8.3. Discussion
    4. 8.4. Sensing Coverage
    5. 8.5. Discussion
    6. 8.6. Localization
      1. 8.6.1. Convex Position Estimation
    7. 8.7. Discussion
      1. 8.7.1. Routing
      2. 8.7.2. Attribute-Based Routing
    8. 8.8. Function Computation
    9. 8.9. Discussion
    10. 8.10. Scheduling
      1. 8.10.1. S-MAC
      2. 8.10.2. IEEE 802.15.4 (Zigbee)
    11. 8.11. Notes on the Literature
    12. Problems
    13. References
  13. 9. Sensor Network Platforms and Tools
    1. 9.1. Sensor Node Hardware
      1. 9.1.1. Berkeley Motes
    2. 9.2. Sensor Network Programming Challenges
    3. 9.3. Node-Level Software Platforms
      1. 9.3.1. Operating System: TinyOS
      2. 9.3.2. Imperative Language: nesC
        1. 9.3.2.1. Component Interface
        2. 9.3.2.2. Component Implementation
        3. 9.3.2.3. Concurrency and Atomicity
      3. 9.3.3. Dataflow-Style Language: TinyGALS
        1. 9.3.3.1. TinyGALS Programming Model
        2. 9.3.3.2. TinyGALS Code Generation
    4. 9.4. Node-Level Simulators
      1. 9.4.1. The ns-2 Simulator and Its Sensor Network Extensions
      2. 9.4.2. The Simulator TOSSIM
    5. 9.5. Programming Beyond Individual Nodes: State-Centric Programming
      1. 9.5.1. Collaboration Groups
        1. 9.5.1.1. Examples of Groups
        2. 9.5.1.2. Using Multiple Types of Groups
      2. 9.5.2. PIECES: A State-Centric Design Framework
        1. 9.5.2.1. Principals and Port Agents
        2. 9.5.2.2. Principal Groups
        3. 9.5.2.3. Mobility
        4. 9.5.2.4. PIECES Simulator
      3. 9.5.3. Multitarget Tracking Problem Revisited
        1. 9.5.3.1. Simulation Results
    6. 9.6. Summary
    7. References
  14. 10. Mobile IP
    1. 10.1. The Requirements of Mobile IP
    2. 10.2. Extending the Protocols
    3. 10.3. Reverse Tunneling
    4. 10.4. Security Concerns
    5. Further Reading
      1. Mobile IP
  15. 11. Mobile IPv6
    1. 11.1. Introduction
    2. 11.2. Mobile IPv6 Overview
      1. 11.2.1. Types of Nodes
      2. 11.2.2. Basic Operation of Mobile IPv6
    3. 11.3. Header Extension
      1. 11.3.1. Alignment Requirements
      2. 11.3.2. Home Address Option
      3. 11.3.3. Type 2 Routing Header
      4. 11.3.4. Mobility Header
        1. 11.3.4.1. Binding Refresh Request Message
        2. 11.3.4.2. Home Test Init Message
        3. 11.3.4.3. Care-of Test Init Message
        4. 11.3.4.4. Home Test Message
        5. 11.3.4.5. Care-of Test Message
        6. 11.3.4.6. Binding Update Message
        7. 11.3.4.7. Binding Acknowledgment Message
        8. 11.3.4.8. Binding Error Message
      5. 11.3.5. Mobility Options
        1. 11.3.5.1. Pad1 Option
        2. 11.3.5.2. PadN Option
        3. 11.3.5.3. Binding Refresh Advice Option
        4. 11.3.5.4. Alternate Care-of Address Option
        5. 11.3.5.5. Nonce Indices Option
        6. 11.3.5.6. Binding Authorization Data Option
      6. 11.3.6. Neighbor Discovery Messages
        1. 11.3.6.1. Router Advertisement Message
        2. 11.3.6.2. Prefix Information Option
        3. 11.3.6.3. Advertisement Interval Option
        4. 11.3.6.4. Home Agent Information Option
      7. 11.3.7. ICMPv6 Messages
        1. 11.3.7.1. Dynamic Home Agent Address Discovery Request
        2. 11.3.7.2. Dynamic Home Agent Address Discovery Reply
        3. 11.3.7.3. Mobile Prefix Solicitation
        4. 11.3.7.4. Mobile Prefix Advertisement
    4. 11.4. Procedure of Mobile IPv6
      1. 11.4.1. Protocol Constants and Variables
      2. 11.4.2. Home Registration
      3. 11.4.3. Bi-Directional Tunneling
      4. 11.4.4. Intercepting Packets for a Mobile Node
      5. 11.4.5. Returning Home
    5. 11.5. Route Optimization
      1. 11.5.1. Return Routability
      2. 11.5.2. Sending Initial Messages
      3. 11.5.3. Responding to Initial Messages
      4. 11.5.4. Computing a Shared Secret
      5. 11.5.5. Verifying Message
      6. 11.5.6. Security Considerations
      7. 11.5.7. De-Register Binding for Correspondent Nodes
      8. 11.5.8. Backward Compatibility
    6. 11.6. Movement Detection
    7. 11.7. Dynamic Home Agent Address Discovery
    8. 11.8. Mobile Prefix Solicitation/Advertisement
    9. 11.9. Relationship with IPsec
    10. References
  16. 12. Security and Survivability of Wireless Systems
    1. 12.1. Introduction
    2. 12.2. Background
    3. 12.3. Current Security Approaches in Wireless Networks
    4. 12.4. Current Survivability Approaches in Wireless Networks
    5. 12.5. Framework for Wireless Network Survivability and Security
    6. 12.6. Interaction Between Survivability and Security in Wireless Networks
      1. 12.6.1. Extending the Framework to Include Interactions between Security and Survivability
      2. 12.6.2. Case Study I: Idle Handoffs
      3. 12.6.3. Case Study II: Key Management in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks
        1. 12.6.3.1. Reliability of the New Schemes: Key Connectivity of the New Schemes in Normal Conditions
        2. 12.6.3.2. Resilience of the New Schemes: Key Connectivity of the New Schemes in Attack Conditions
    7. 12.7. Conclusion
    8. References