You are previewing Wiley Handbook of Learning Technology.
O'Reilly logo
Wiley Handbook of Learning Technology

Book Description

The Wiley Handbook of Learning Technology is an authoritative and up-to-date survey of the fast-growing field of learning technology, from its foundational theories and practices to its challenges, trends, and future developments.
  • Offers an examination of learning technology that is equal parts theoretical and practical, covering both the technology of learning and the use of technology in learning
  • Individual chapters tackle timely and controversial subjects, such as gaming and simulation, security, lifelong learning, distance education, learning across educational settings, and the research agenda
  • Designed to serve as a point of entry for learning technology novices, a comprehensive reference for scholars and researchers, and a practical guide for education and training practitioners
  • Includes 29 original and comprehensively referenced essays written by leading experts in instructional and educational technology from around the world

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Foreword
  4. Acknowledgements
  5. Contributors
  6. Editorial Advisory Board
  7. 1 Mapping the Field and Terminology
    1. 1.1 Living with Change
    2. 1.2 What is Learning Technology?
    3. 1.3 Focusing on Learning
    4. 1.4 What are the Technologies?
    5. 1.5 Making it Work
    6. 1.6 Study and Ethical Practice
    7. 1.7 Current Issues
    8. 1.8 Innovation and Change
    9. 1.9 Conclusion
    10. References
  8. 2 How People Learn
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Human Cognitive Architecture and Learning Processes
    3. 2.3 Self-Regulated and Self-Directed Learning
    4. 2.4 Discussion
    5. References
  9. 3 What is Technology?
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 The Absence of Thinking about Technology Within Learning Technology
    3. 3.3 Foundational Discussions of Technology
    4. 3.4 Contemporary Discussions of Technology
    5. 3.5 Technology as Cause
    6. 3.6 Technology as Social Intervention
    7. 3.7 Technology as Social Effect
    8. 3.8 Technology as the Instantiation of Theory
    9. 3.9 Technology as a System Within Systems
    10. 3.10 Technology as Network Effect
    11. 3.11 Conclusions
    12. References
  10. 4 Learning Theory and Technology
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Understanding Teachers’ and Designers’ Conceptions of Learning
    3. 4.3 Teachers’ Beliefs about Technology
    4. 4.4 Three Views on Learning
    5. 4.5 Learning as Response Strengthening: Behaviorism
    6. 4.6 Learning as Knowledge Acquisition: Cognitive Information Processing
    7. 4.7 Learning as Knowledge Construction: Constructivism
    8. 4.8 Changes in Theory Prompting Changes in Tools
    9. 4.9 Changes in Tools Prompting Changes in Theory
    10. 4.10 Conclusion
    11. References
  11. 5 Evolution of Learning Technologies
    1. 5.1 Background: Early Technological Infrastructure
    2. 5.2 Phases of Development of Learning Technologies
    3. 5.3 1980s: Programmed Learning and Multimedia Resources
    4. 5.4 Late 1980s to Early 1990s: Hypertext and Simulations
    5. 5.5 1993: The Internet and the Web
    6. 5.6 1995: Learning Systems
    7. 5.7 1998: Mobile Devices and m-Learning
    8. 5.8 2000: Gaming Technologies
    9. 5.9 2001: Open Educational Resources
    10. 5.10 2004: Social and Participatory Media
    11. 5.11 2005: Virtual Worlds
    12. 5.12 2007: E-books and Smart Devices
    13. 5.13 2008: Massive Open Online Courses
    14. 5.14 2012–14: Big Data and Learning Analytics
    15. 5.15 Summary
    16. References
  12. 6 Learning Technology at Home and Preschool
    1. 6.1 Learning Technology
    2. 6.2 Data on Availability and Use of Digital Media
    3. 6.3 The Debates about Young Children and Technology
    4. 6.4 Play and Learning in the Early Years
    5. 6.5 Digital Media and Technology in Preschool Settings
    6. 6.6 Digital Media and Technology at Home
    7. 6.7 Design
    8. 6.8 Looking Ahead
    9. References
  13. 7 Problem Spaces
    1. 7.1 Introduction: Towards a Critical Pedagogy of Learning Technologies
    2. 7.2 Technology-supported Pedagogy: Problem Spaces
    3. 7.3 Problem Space 1: Pedagogy and Learning Design—Imperatives for Perpetual Renewal
    4. 7.4 Problem Space 2: Teacher Professional Development and Research
    5. 7.5 Problem Space 3: Web 2.0 and School Cultures
    6. 7.6 Conclusion
    7. References
  14. 8 Learning Technology in Higher Education
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Students
    3. 8.3 Instructors
    4. 8.4 Learning Design
    5. 8.5 Support
    6. 8.6 Technology
    7. 8.7 Institutional Dimensions
    8. 8.8 Conclusion
    9. References
  15. 9 Learning Technology in Business and Industry
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 Foundations
    3. 9.3 Status Quo
    4. 9.4 Interoperability Standards
    5. 9.5 Emergent Directions
    6. 9.6 Conclusion
    7. References
  16. 10 Educational Technologies in Distance Education
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 From China’s Imperial Examination to MOOCs: A Brief History of Distance Education
    3. 10.3 Issues in Educational Technology and Distance Education
    4. 10.4 Research and Scholarship
    5. 10.5 Concluding Remarks
    6. References
  17. 11 Learning Technology and Lifelong Informal, Self-directed, and Non-formal Learning
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Educational Technology and Informal Learning
    3. 11.3 Citizen Science
    4. 11.4 Educational Technology and Non-formal Education
    5. 11.5 Telecenters
    6. 11.6 Evaluation and Quality Assurance
    7. 11.7 Conclusion
    8. References
  18. 12 Learning with Technologies in Resource-constrained Environments
    1. 12.1 Introduction
    2. 12.2 Learning in Resource-constrained Environments
    3. 12.3 Learning with Technologies
    4. 12.4 Meaningful Learning within a Triadic Zone of Proximal Development
    5. 12.5 Integrating Home and School Cultures
    6. 12.6 The Importance of Affordances and Effectivities
    7. 12.7 Exploiting Local Knowledge
    8. 12.8 DIY Citizenship and the Maker Movement
    9. 12.9 Insensitivity to Prior Knowledge
    10. 12.10 Mobile Learning: An Ignored Obvious Choice
    11. 12.11 Open Educational Resources
    12. 12.12 Massive Open Online Courses
    13. 12.13 Educators Shift to Cloud-based Tools
    14. 12.14 Learning through Connected Devices 24/7
    15. 12.15 Pedagogical Choices for Teaching with Technology
    16. 12.16 Conclusion
    17. References
  19. 13 Competencies for Designers, Instructors, and Online Learners
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 Standards of Performance
    3. 13.3 Changes Affecting Learning Technology
    4. 13.4 Evolving Understanding of Learning Processes
    5. 13.5 Instructional Designer Competence
    6. 13.6 Instructor Competence
    7. 13.7 Online Learner Competence
    8. 13.8 Conclusion
    9. References
  20. 14 Digital Learning Environments
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Organizational Structures
    3. 14.3 Designing Learning Environments and Learning Experiences
    4. 14.4 Illustrative Example: The YoTeach! Learning Environment
    5. 14.5 Guided vs Minimally Guided Instruction within Digital Learning Environments
    6. 14.6 Illustrative Example: Project Engage!
    7. 14.7 Repurposed Digital Learning Environments and their Neutrality
    8. 14.8 Illustrative Example: Twitter and #PhDChat
    9. 14.9 Conclusion
    10. References
  21. 15 How to Succeed with Online Learning
    1. 15.1 Introduction
    2. 15.2 The Place of Formal and Informal Online Learning in “The Blend”
    3. 15.3 Live Online Learning
    4. 15.4 Asynchronous
    5. 15.5 The Rise of Online Learning
    6. 15.6 Online Learning in the Workplace
    7. 15.7 Looking Ahead
    8. References
  22. 16 Diversity and Inclusion in the Learning Enterprise
    1. 16.1 Introduction
    2. 16.2 Overview
    3. 16.3 Learning, Culture, and Digital Technologies
    4. 16.4 The Convergence of Digital Technologies and Learning Spaces
    5. 16.5 Diversity, Learning Technologies, and Teaching
    6. 16.6 Diversity, Learning Technologies, and Policymaking
    7. 16.7 Technology Designers: The Invisible Policymakers
    8. 16.8 The Ecology of Diversity and Learning Technologies
    9. References
  23. 17 Sins of Omission
    1. 17.1 Introduction
    2. 17.2 Definition of Terms
    3. 17.3 Review of Research
    4. 17.4 Cultural Approaches to Online Learning
    5. 17.5 Interdisciplinary Research on Semiotics
    6. 17.6 A Look at Semiotics and At-risk and Diverse Learners
    7. 17.7 Other Issues that can Affect Student Retention in Online Courses
    8. 17.8 Theory and Method
    9. 17.9 Summary
    10. References
  24. 18 Equity, Access, and the Digital Divide in Learning Technologies
    1. 18.1 Introduction
    2. 18.2 Equity of Access
    3. 18.3 Historical Antecedents
    4. 18.4 The Digital Divide
    5. 18.5 Issues in Equity and Access
    6. 18.6 Current Issues
    7. 18.7 Technology Integration and Equity of Access
    8. 18.8 Managing Increasing Information
    9. 18.9 Conclusions and Future Directions
    10. 18.10 Lessons Learned
    11. 18.11 Future Research
    12. References
  25. 19 University Learning Technology Control and Security
    1. 19.1 Introduction
    2. 19.2 Educational Master Plan
    3. 19.3 Strategic Planning
    4. 19.4 Operational Planning
    5. 19.5 Tactical Planning
    6. 19.6 Technology
    7. 19.7 Technology Plan: Control
    8. 19.8 Technology Committee: Control and Team
    9. 19.9 Technology Security
    10. 19.10 Higher Education Security Issues
    11. 19.11 Securing Technology
    12. 19.12 Learning Technology Group
    13. 19.13 Information Technology Group: The Security Organization
    14. 19.14 Fostering Teamwork
    15. 19.15 Conclusion
    16. References
  26. 20 The Design of Learning
    1. 20.1 Introduction
    2. 20.2 The Notion of Design
    3. 20.3 Design Challenges
    4. 20.4 Design and Research
    5. 20.5 Discussion
    6. Acknowledgements
    7. References
  27. 21 Mobile Learning and Social Networking
    1. 21.1 Introduction
    2. 21.2 Mobile Learning as a Learning Technology
    3. 21.3 Mobile Learning as Innovation
    4. 21.4 Mobile Learning as Social Intervention
    5. 21.5 The Evidence and Impact
    6. 21.6 Social Networking as a Learning Technology
    7. 21.7 Mobile Learning and a Mobile Society
    8. 21.8 Mobile Learning – Moving Across the Atlantic, Moving into the Market
    9. 21.9 Learning with Mobiles as a Social Phenomenon
    10. 21.10 Learning Technology: No Longer Recognizable
    11. References
  28. 22 The Utility of Games for Society, Business, and Politics
    1. 22.1 Introduction
    2. 22.2 Fragmentation
    3. 22.3 Learning and Games
    4. 22.4 Definitions and Taxonomies
    5. 22.5 Framing Theory
    6. 22.6 Frame-reflective Discourse Analysis
    7. 22.7 Methodological Approach
    8. 22.8 Frame Analysis of Serious Games
    9. 22.9 Frame-reflective Discourse Analysis: Research
    10. 22.10 Frame-reflective Discourse Analysis: Policy
    11. 22.11 Practical Implications
    12. 22.12 Conclusion
    13. References
  29. 23 The Investment in Learning Technologies
    1. 23.1 Introduction
    2. 23.2 What do We Mean by Value for Money?
    3. 23.3 Getting the Basics Right
    4. 23.4 Planning the Investment
    5. 23.5 What Exactly are “Full Costs”?
    6. 23.6 What Kinds of Learning Investments are More or Less Likely to Deliver Value for Money?
    7. 23.7 What About the Enabling Software?
    8. 23.8 Calculating Value for Money
    9. 23.9 What Can We Conclude About Learning Technologies and Value for Money?
    10. References
  30. 24 Technology Planning in Schools
    1. 24.1 Introduction
    2. 24.2 Technology Implementation Theories
    3. 24.3 Conditions that Facilitate Implementation
    4. 24.4 RIPPLES
    5. 24.5 Other Implementation Models
    6. 24.6 Developing Technology Implementation Plans
    7. 24.7 Professional Development for Technology Planning
    8. 24.8 Evaluating Technology Implementation and Integration
    9. 24.9 Researching Technology Implementation
    10. 24.10 Conclusion
    11. References
  31. 25 Surviving the Next Generation of Organizations—as Leaders
    1. 25.1 Problematic: Bridging a Gap for a New Generation of Educational Technology Leaders
    2. 25.2 Mapping Terrain: A Critical Examination of Ideas and Trends in the Educational Technology and Educational Leadership Fields
    3. 25.3 Bridging the Gap: Four Sets of Principles for Educational Technologists Who Will Lead the Next Generation of Organizations
    4. 25.4 Conclusion
    5. References
  32. 26 Futureproofing
    1. 26.1 Introduction
    2. 26.2 Factors Shaping Society and Education
    3. 26.3 Abundance
    4. 26.4 Acceleration
    5. 26.5 Integration
    6. 26.6 Preparing for Unknown Curricula
    7. 26.7 The Near Term
    8. 26.8 The Long Term
    9. 26.9 The Far Term
    10. 26.10 Conclusion
    11. References
  33. 27 Towards a Research Agenda for Educational Technology Research
    1. 27.1 Introduction
    2. 27.2 Two Cities
    3. 27.3 The Age of Foolishness and the Age of Wisdom
    4. 27.4 Towards a Research Agenda
    5. References
  34. 28 The Dystopian Futures
    1. 28.1 Introduction
    2. 28.2 Dystopian Visions of Learning, Education, and Technology
    3. 28.3 Making Good Use of Dystopian Visions of Learning Technology
    4. References
  35. 29 Utopian Futures for Learning Technologies
    1. 29.1 Introduction
    2. 29.2 Technological Utopianism
    3. 29.3 A Utopian Future for Learning Technologies
    4. 29.4 A Model for a Utopian Future in Learning Technologies
    5. 29.5 Key Factors for Change
    6. 29.6 2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning
    7. 29.7 Shifts from Educational Institutions to Learning Flows: Mapping the Future of Learning
    8. 29.8 Organizations: The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age
    9. 29.9 Learning Technologies
    10. 29.10 A Vision for Future Learning Technologies
    11. References
  36. Index
  37. End User License Agreement