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What'S The Secret?: To Providing a World-Class Customer Experience

Book Description

What's the Secrets? gives you an inside look at the world-class customer service strategies at today?s some of today?s best companies. You'll learn how companies like Disney, Nordstrom, and The Ritz-Carlton get 50,000 employees to deliver world-class customer service on a consistent basis- and how your company can too. Packed with insider knowledge and a wealth of proven best practices, author John DiJulius will show you how your company can emulate the world?s best customer service providers.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface
  3. Secret Service Terminology
  4. Acknowledgments
  5. I. The Customer Service Crisis
  6. 1. The Smoking Gun
    1. 1.1. In Denial
    2. 1.2. Perception Is Reality
      1. 1.2.1. Could They Be Us?
    3. 1.3. Customer Service and Its Impact on Sales
      1. 1.3.1. Customer Satisfaction and Stock Prices
    4. 1.4. Irrefutable Evidence
    5. 1.5. Stone Ages
    6. 1.6. Service Vision—To Be the Most Customer-Centric Company in the World
    7. 1.7. Companies and the Customers Who Hate Them
    8. 1.8. Artificial Growth versus True Growth
    9. 1.9. Making Price Less Relevant
    10. 1.10. When the Brand's Message Contradicts the Customer's Experience
    11. 1.11. Customer Satisfaction Is a Fortune Teller
    12. 1.12. Conclusion
    13. 1.13. It Is Time to Either Get on, Get off, or Get Run over
    14. 1.14. Notes
  7. 2. The State of Service
    1. 2.1. The Customer Service Crisis
    2. 2.2. Return on Hassle
    3. 2.3. The Bar Has Been Set
    4. 2.4. Cracking the Code
      1. 2.4.1. Lack of Service Aptitude
      2. 2.4.2. Rapid Decline in People Skills
    5. 2.5. The Customer Service Revolution
      1. 2.5.1. Customer Service Is Making a Comeback
      2. 2.5.2. How Many People Work in Your Company's Customer Service Department?
      3. 2.5.3. Who's Your Customer?
      4. 2.5.4. Who Is Your Competition?
    6. 2.6. The Experience Formula
      1. 2.6.1. When the Predator Becomes the Prey
      2. 2.6.2. Do You Compete on Price or on Service?
      3. 2.6.3. People Want Either the Best or the Least Expensive
    7. 2.7. Get over It!
      1. 2.7.1. Air Mickey
    8. 2.8. Customer Rage
    9. 2.9. Customer Service Is Not Just about People
    10. 2.10. It's All about Service
      1. 2.10.1. Flavor of the Month
    11. 2.11. Notes
  8. 3. World-Class Service Sins
    1. 3.1. Lack of Service Aptitude
    2. 3.2. Decline in People Skills
    3. 3.3. Inability to Connect Employees and Jobs to Success
    4. 3.4. Poor Hiring Standards
    5. 3.5. Lack of Ongoing Experiential Training
    6. 3.6. Not Letting Employees Have Input on Systems
    7. 3.7. Failure to Implement and Execute Consistently
    8. 3.8. Lack of a Strong Employee Culture
    9. 3.9. Lack of Measurements and Accountability
    10. 3.10. Focus on Artificial Growth
    11. 3.11. Service Blunder: An Example
    12. 3.12. World-Class in Action
      1. 3.12.1. e-Service
      2. 3.12.2. Scenography
    13. 3.13. Experiential Reports
    14. 3.14. Notes
  9. 4. Service Aptitude Level
    1. 4.1. What's the Real Service Aptitude Level of Your Company?
      1. 4.1.1. C-SAT Report
    2. 4.2. Company Service Aptitude Test
      1. 4.2.1. Intro Questions
      2. 4.2.2. I. Service Vision
      3. 4.2.3. II. Creating a World-Class Internal Culture
      4. 4.2.4. III. Nonnegotiable Experiential Standards
      5. 4.2.5. IV. Secret Service Systems
      6. 4.2.6. V. Training To Provide a World-Class Customer Experience
      7. 4.2.7. VI. Implementation and Execution
      8. 4.2.8. VII. Zero Risk
      9. 4.2.9. VIII. Creating an Above-and-Beyond Culture
      10. 4.2.10. IX. Measuring Your Customer's Experience
      11. 4.2.11. X. World-Class Leadership
      12. 4.2.12. XI. Comprehensive
    3. 4.3. Recommended Action Plan
      1. 4.3.1. The Next Step
    4. 4.4. Notes
  10. II. The Customer Service Revolution
  11. 5. Commandment I: Service Vision
    1. 5.1. Creating a Successful Service Vision
    2. 5.2. Disney's Service Vision
    3. 5.3. How to Create a Service Vision
    4. 5.4. Creating a Service Brand Promise
    5. 5.5. How Inspirational Are Your Service Brand Promises?
      1. 5.5.1. Powerful Service Brand Promises
    6. 5.6. Is It Expensive Coffee—or Inexpensive Rent?
    7. 5.7. What Is Your Company's Priceless?
      1. 5.7.1. Have a Five-Year-Old's Mentality
    8. 5.8. A Few of My Favorite "isms"
      1. 5.8.1. Levy-isms
      2. 5.8.2. The Ritz-Carlton-ism
      3. 5.8.3. Disney-ism
      4. 5.8.4. Starbucks-ism
      5. 5.8.5. John Robert's Spa-ism
    9. 5.9. Personal Service Brand Promises
      1. 5.9.1. Daymaker
      2. 5.9.2. Your Best Friend
      3. 5.9.3. THE Authority on World-Class Customer Experience
      4. 5.9.4. Changing the Mindset
      5. 5.9.5. The DiJulius Group Hospital
    10. 5.10. Marketing Your Service Vision
    11. 5.11. What We Do Today Impacts Our Customers' Lives
    12. 5.12. Everyone Plays a Part in the Success of the Service Vision
    13. 5.13. Notes
  12. 6. Commandment II: Creating a World-Class Internal Culture
    1. 6.1. Why People Leave
    2. 6.2. Disney's Approach to People Management
      1. 6.2.1. Scare Them Away
    3. 6.3. Build the Culture and the Customers Will Come
      1. 6.3.1. The Employee Career Experience
      2. 6.3.2. Everyone Plays a Part in Delivering an Experience
      3. 6.3.3. Humanizing Lawyers
    4. 6.4. Notes
  13. 7. Commandment III: Nonnegotiable Experiential Standards
    1. 7.1. Experience Tax
      1. 7.1.1. Do You Swear to Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth ...
      2. 7.1.2. People Want Either the Best or the Least Expensive
    2. 7.2. Teacher Becomes the Student
    3. 7.3. The Six Components of a Customer's Experience
    4. 7.4. Task Focused versus Customer Focused
    5. 7.5. Focusing More on What Drives Customer Satisfaction
      1. 7.5.1. Humanize
    6. 7.6. World-Class Service Is Not Restricted to Upscale Businesses
      1. 7.6.1. Examples of Nonnegotiable Standards
      2. 7.6.2. Can We Learn from Junk Collectors?
      3. 7.6.3. e-Experience
    7. 7.7. Notes
  14. 8. Commandment IV: Secret Service Systems
    1. 8.1. Brief Review
    2. 8.2. Giving a Customer a Memorable Experience
      1. 8.2.1. Cheat Sheets
    3. 8.3. If You Know It, Use It
      1. 8.3.1. Personalize the Customer
      2. 8.3.2. Walking the Talk
      3. 8.3.3. The Norm Factor
    4. 8.4. Distinguish New from Returning Customers
    5. 8.5. Secret Service Lawyers
    6. 8.6. Guestology
      1. 8.6.1. It's a Two-Way Name Game
    7. 8.7. Secret Service for Retailer
      1. 8.7.1. Building Rapport
      2. 8.7.2. Starbucks Difference
      3. 8.7.3. Starbucks Mania
    8. 8.8. Whose Experience Is It?
    9. 8.9. Secret Service Case Study: The Melting Pot Restaurants
      1. 8.9.1. The Opportunity
      2. 8.9.2. The Action
      3. 8.9.3. Closing
      4. 8.9.4. The Results
      5. 8.9.5. Mandarin Oriental Hotel
    10. 8.10. Peripheral Vision
      1. 8.10.1. SuperService
      2. 8.10.2. Hyatt Rolls out New Wake-Up Call Service
    11. 8.11. Notes
  15. 9. Commandment V: Training to Provide a World-Class Customer Experience
    1. 9.1. Hard-To-Soft Training Ratio
    2. 9.2. Shadow Training Is a Shadow of What You Need
    3. 9.3. Customer Experience Promise
      1. 9.3.1. Customer Experience Cycle Workshop
    4. 9.4. Systems and Processes That Remove Variation in the Customer's Experience
      1. 9.4.1. Enterprise Rent-A-Car
    5. 9.5. Million Dollar Keynote Presentation
    6. 9.6. Only Companies That "Get it" —Want It
      1. 9.6.1. Understanding Guest Happiness
      2. 9.6.2. World-Class Training
      3. 9.6.3. What Does Great Service Look Like?
      4. 9.6.4. World-Class Benchmarks
    7. 9.7. A Smile Is Rare Today
      1. 9.7.1. A Smile Is Part of the Uniform
    8. 9.8. Notes
  16. 10. Commandment VI: Implementation and Execution
    1. 10.1. Consistency and Continuity
      1. 10.1.1. Rule 1: Select a Path, Train on It, and Stick with It
      2. 10.1.2. Rule 2: Implement Slowly and Properly
    2. 10.2. Guillotine Filtering System
    3. 10.3. Manage the Experience
      1. 10.3.1. Annually
    4. 10.4. Notes
  17. 11. Commandment VII: Zero Risk
    1. 11.1. Don't Ask If You Don't Want to Know
    2. 11.2. Fine or Okay Is Unacceptable
      1. 11.2.1. A Complaint Is a Gift
      2. 11.2.2. Own the Problem, Own the Customer
      3. 11.2.3. It Is Not Our Fault but It Is Still Our Problem
      4. 11.2.4. Sorry, but Your Credit Card Was Declined
      5. 11.2.5. Owning Shipping Problems
      6. 11.2.6. Your Room Is Not Ready
      7. 11.2.7. You Can Go Online for That Information
    3. 11.3. Management Service Recovery Training
    4. 11.4. How Accessible Are You?
      1. 11.4.1. Oversharing
      2. 11.4.2. Calling an Audible
      3. 11.4.3. See? It's Not My Fault!
      4. 11.4.4. Unconditional Guarantees
    5. 11.5. Problem Solved = Loyalty
      1. 11.5.1. Southwest Airlines
    6. 11.6. Service Recovery Quiz
      1. 11.6.1. A World-Class Service Recovery
      2. 11.6.2. Title Nine Sports
    7. 11.7. Silence Is Not Always Golden
      1. 11.7.1. How Can Your Company Become Zero Risk?
    8. 11.8. Notes
  18. 12. Commandment VIII: Creating an Above-and-Beyond Culture
    1. 12.1. Creating Loyal Customers
    2. 12.2. Above and Beyond Is a Matter of Service Aptitude
    3. 12.3. The Answer's Yes ... What's the Question?
      1. 12.3.1. Focus on What You Can Do, Not What You Can't Do
      2. 12.3.2. First Impressions versus Final Impressions
    4. 12.4. Anticipating and Delivering on Your Customer's Needs
    5. 12.5. Become a Storytelling Company
      1. 12.5.1. Branding Your Above-and-Beyond Stories
    6. 12.6. Train and Test for Above-and-Beyond Opportunities
      1. 12.6.1. Is It a Standard or an Above and Beyond?
      2. 12.6.2. A Swing and a Miss
      3. 12.6.3. People Crave What They Have Experienced and Enjoyed
    7. 12.7. Customer Service Revolution
      1. 12.7.1. Do Your Employees Have to Ask Permission?
      2. 12.7.2. Don't Win the Argument But Lose the Customer
      3. 12.7.3. Daily PreShift Huddles
    8. 12.8. Being a Daymaker
    9. 12.9. Notes
  19. 13. Commandment IX: Measuring Your Customer's Experience
    1. 13.1. Don't Try This at Home
    2. 13.2. Why Measure Customer Satisfaction?
    3. 13.3. The Enemy of "Great" Is "Good Enough"
      1. 13.3.1. Satisfied Customer Myth
    4. 13.4. Five Things Learned from Talking to 100 Million People
      1. 13.4.1. Principle 1: A Satisfied Customer Is Not a Loyal Customer
      2. 13.4.2. Principle 2: Loyal Customers Drive Sales and Profits
      3. 13.4.3. Principle 3: Inconsistent Performance Can Kill a Brand—Looking at the Big Picture Can Be Deceiving
      4. 13.4.4. Principle 4: Opportunities to Win Loyalty Are Cleverly Disguised as Problems
      5. 13.4.5. Principle 5: Brand Loyalty Begins at Home
    5. 13.5. Measurement Can Prevent Costly Mistakes
    6. 13.6. Word of Mouth Is Much Louder Today
    7. 13.7. Service Recovery
    8. 13.8. Is Customer Engagement Overrated?
    9. 13.9. What Gets Measured Gets Managed
    10. 13.10. The Ultimate Question
    11. 13.11. Sport Clips
    12. 13.12. Closing Ratio
    13. 13.13. Can't Be All Things to All People
      1. 13.13.1. Do It Yourself
      2. 13.13.2. Demonstrating the Impact of Improved Customer Satisfaction
      3. 13.13.3. Crystal Ball
    14. 13.14. Notes
  20. 14. Commandment X: World-Class Leadership
    1. 14.1. Guess Who
    2. 14.2. Habits of World-Class Leaders
      1. 14.2.1. Live Your Dream
      2. 14.2.2. Fight for Your Dreams
      3. 14.2.3. Sell Your Dreams
    3. 14.3. Chief Visionary Officer
      1. 14.3.1. Be a Dream Maker
      2. 14.3.2. Believe in People
    4. 14.4. Secret Service at Home
    5. 14.5. Daily Journals
      1. 14.5.1. Bedtime Stories
      2. 14.5.2. After School Phone Calls
      3. 14.5.3. Surprise Day with Dad
    6. 14.6. Blocking Off the Calendar
      1. 14.6.1. Drive-In Movie Night
      2. 14.6.2. Lemonade Stand
      3. 14.6.3. Video a Life in Our Kids' Day
      4. 14.6.4. E-mail Notice
      5. 14.6.5. Surprise Late-Night Movie
      6. 14.6.6. Breakfast before School