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Web Services Research for Emerging Applications: Discoveries and Trends

Book Description

Web Services Research for Emerging Applications: Discoveries and Trends provides a comprehensive assessment of the latest developments in Web services, with chapters focused on composing and coordinating Web services, the design and development of Service Oriented Architectures, and XML security.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Editorial Advisory Board
  3. Preface
  4. 1. SOA Reference Architecture
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. S3: ARCHITECTURAL STYLE OF AN SOA
      1. S3: A Solution View
      2. The SOA Reference Architecture Metamodel
        1. Layers
        2. Options
        3. Architectural Decisions
        4. Normative Guidance
        5. Method Activities
        6. Architectural Building Blocks
        7. Interaction Patterns
        8. Key Performance Indicators
        9. Non-Functional Requirement Constraints
        10. Enabling Technology
        11. Exposed Business Services
        12. External Service Connectors
        13. Data Models
        14. Functional Requirements
    4. SOA-RA VIEW MODELS
      1. Enterprise View Model
        1. Presentation
    5. BUSINESS PROCESS
      1. Service
      2. Service Component
      3. Backend Resource
      4. Integration/QoS/Data Architecture/Governance
      5. IT System View Model
      6. Services View Model
      7. SOA Services Enablement
      8. Presentation Services
      9. SOA Transformation Services
      10. SOA Design Services
      11. SOA Implementation Services
      12. SOA Integration Services
      13. SOA Management Services
      14. SOA Data Transformation Services
      15. SOA Governance Services
    6. MODELING END-TO-END SOA SOLUTIONS USING S3
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
  5. 2. WSMoD: A Methodology for Qos-Based Web Services Design
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. RELATED WORK
      1. Web Services Design Approaches
      2. Quality of Services
      3. Ontology and Design Frameworks
      4. Open Issues
    4. THE ROLE OF ONTOLOGIES
    5. WSMOD IN A NUTSHELL
    6. RUNNING CASE
    7. PHASE 1: SERVICE IDENTIFICATION
      1. Methodological Step
      2. Running Case
    8. PHASE 2: SERVICE MODELING
      1. Methodological Step
      2. Running Case
    9. PHASE 3: HIGH LEVEL RE-DESIGN
      1. Data and Operation Design
      2. Interaction Design
      3. Running Case
    10. PHASE 4: CUSTOMIZATION
      1. Channel Customization
      2. Running Case
      3. User Customization
      4. Running Case
    11. WEB SERVICE DESCRIPTION
      1. Methodological Step
      2. Running Case
    12. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    13. ACKNOWLEGMENT
    14. REFERENCES
  6. 3. A Metamorphic Testing Methodology for Online SOA Application Testing
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. PRELIMINARIES
      1. Service
      2. Metamorphic Relation (MR)
      3. Metamorphic Testing (MT)
      4. Assumptions and Terminologies
    4. AN ONLINE TESTING APPROACH
      1. Overview
      2. Metamorphic Service (MS)
      3. Testing in the Online Mode
    5. AN ILLUSTRATION SCENARIO
    6. EXPERIMENT
      1. The Subject Program
      2. Experimental Setup
      3. Empirical Results
    7. RELATED WORK
    8. CONCLUDING REMARKS
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
    11. ENDNOTES
  7. 4. Integrated Design of eBanking Architecture
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH
    4. HYBRID METHODOLOGY
    5. ARCHITECTURE BASELINE MODEL
    6. SERVICE PATTERNS
    7. ENTERPRISE SERVICE MODEL
    8. DOMAIN-SPECIFIC MODEL
    9. SERVICE-ORIENTED INTEGRATION, PROCESS, & MANAGEMENT
    10. REUSABLE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM PLATFORM & EXTENSIBLE COMPONENT TECHNOLOGY
    11. APPLYING IDEA FRAMEWORK IN SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT
    12. CHALLENGES
    13. CONCLUSION
    14. REFERENCES
  8. 5. A Similarity Measure for Process Mining in Service Oriented Architecture
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
      1. SOA and Business Process Mining
      2. Web Service Process Reference Model
      3. Process Dependency Graph
        1. Definition 2 (Dependency Graph, DG)
        2. Definition 3 (δ-Comparability of DG)
      4. Motivating Scenarios
      5. Process Difference Analysis
        1. Comparison Matrices
        2. Definition 4 (Identical Dependency Graphs)
        3. Definition 5 (Process Matrix, M)
        4. Definition 6 (Normalized Matrix, NM)
        5. Distance-Based Process Similarity Measures
        6. Definition 7 (Dependency Difference Metric, d)
        7. Theorem 1. d(DG1, DG2) Satisfies Distance Measure Properties
      6. Prototype Implementation and Experiments
      7. Related Work
    3. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    4. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    5. REFERENCES
  9. 6. Rapid Development of Adaptable Situation-Aware Service-Based Systems
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. RELATED WORK
      1. Applications
      2. Planning and Web Service Composition
      3. Web Services and Workflow Specification Languages
      4. Situation Awareness (SAW)
    4. BACKGROUND
      1. α-Calculus
      2. α-Logic
      3. Our Declarative SAW Model
    5. OVERVIEW OF OUR APPROACH
    6. SAW REQUIREMENTS FOR SERVICE COMPOSITION
      1. Specifying Control Flow Graphs
      2. Specifying Situational Constraints
      3. Extracting Situational Constraints from SAW Requirements
        1. Step 1) Translation from SAW Model to α-logic Specifications
        2. Step 2) Automated Partitioning of Specified Situations
        3. Step 3) Automated Extraction of Situational Constraints
    7. AUTOMATED SYNTHESIS OF SITUATION-AWARE WORKFLOW AGENTS
      1. Service Composition with α-logic
      2. The Enforce Procedure
      3. A Risk Reduction Framework for Dynamic Workflows
      4. Backup Workflow Synthesis
      5. Cycle Detection and Simplification
      6. Automated Synthesis of α-calculus Terms Defining Situation- Aware Workflow Agents
      7. The Agent Platform
    8. CASE STUDY
      1. Intelligent Management and Optimization of Power Systems
      2. An Example Management Scenario
      3. Developing an Intelligent Control System
      4. Software Engineering Experiences in the Case Study
    9. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    10. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    11. REFERENCES
  10. 7. Object-Oriented Architecture for Web Services Eventing
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
      1. Motivation
      2. Model
      3. Example
      4. Design Principles
      5. Hierarchical View of the Network
    3. ARCHITECTURE
      1. The Hierarchy of Scopes
      2. The Anatomy of a Scope
      3. Hierarchical Composition of Policies
      4. Communication Channels
      5. Constructing the Dissemination Structure
      6. The Local Architecture of a Dissemination Scope
      7. Sessions
      8. Incorporating Reliability, Ordering, and Security
      9. Hierarchical Approach to Reliability
      10. Building the Hierarchy of Recovery Domains
      11. Recovery Agents
      12. Modeling Recovery Protocols
      13. Implementing Recovery Domains with Agents
      14. Reconfiguration
      15. Ordering
      16. Other Possible Frameworks
    4. CONCLUSION
    5. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    6. REFERENCES
  11. 8. Composing and Coordinating Transactional Web Services
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. PRELIMINARY DEFINITIONS AND METHODOLOGY
      1. Consistent Composite Web Services
      2. Methodology
      3. Motivating Example
    4. TRANSACTIONAL MODEL
      1. Transactional Properties of Services
      2. Termination States
      3. Transactional Consistency Tool
    5. ANALYSIS OF TS(W)
      1. Inherent Properties of TS(W)
      2. Classification Within TS(W)
    6. FORMING ATS(W)
      1. Deriving Composite Services From ATS
      2. 7.1. Acceptability of Ws with respect to ATS(W)
      3. Transaction-Aware Assignment Procedure
      4. Extraction of Transactional Requirements
      5. Service Assignment Process
      6. Coordination of Ws
      7. Discussion
      8. Example
    7. IMPLEMENTATION
    8. COORDINATION
    9. RELATED WORK
    10. CONCLUSION
    11. ACKNOWLEGMENT
    12. REFERENCES
  12. 9. Security Personalization for Internet and Web Services
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. INTERNET SERVICES, REQUIREMENTS FOR SECURITY POLICIES AND THEIR NEGOTIATION
      1. Internet Services
      2. Security Policy Requirements
      3. Security Policy Negotiation Requirements
    4. SECURITY POLICY NEGOTIATION
      1. Goals of Security Policy Negotiation
      2. Internet Service Security Policy
      3. Security Policy Negotiation
      4. Satisfying the Negotiation Requirements
      5. Scheme for Online Help in Making Offers
      6. Implementation for Web Services
    5. APPLICATION EXAMPLES
      1. Stocks Unlimited
      2. Easy Learn
    6. PROTOTYPE FOR SECURITY POLICY NEGOTIATION
    7. RELATED WORK
    8. EVALUATION
    9. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE RESEARCH
    10. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    11. REFERENCES
    12. ENDNOTES
  13. 10. XML Security with Binary XML for Mobile Web Services
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. XML SECURITY
      1. Usage Scenarios
      2. XML Security Standards
    4. COMPATIBILITY OPTIONS
      1. Dual Format
      2. Trusted Gateway
      3. Thin Gateway
      4. Discussion
    5. EXPERIMENTATION RESULTS
      1. Experimentation Setup
      2. Message Sizes
      3. Timing Measurements
      4. Comparison with SSL
      5. Battery Consumption Measurements
    6. RELATED WORK
    7. RECOMMENDATIONS
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
  14. 11. Efficient and Effective XML Encoding
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. RELATED WORK
      1. Overview
      2. XML Compressors Supporting Dynamic Schema Processing
      3. Evaluation Setup
      4. Compression Performance
    4. PUSHDOWN AUTOMATA APPROACH
      1. Architecture
      2. Performance Comparison
    5. IMPLEMENTATION ON RESOURCE-CONSTRAINED DEVICES
    6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    7. REFERENCES
  15. 12. Data Mining in Web Services Discovery and Monitoring
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. DATA MINING AND ITS OPEARTIONS
    4. APPLICATION OF DATA MINING IN WEB SERVICES
      1. Business Applications
        1. Web Services Cost and Savings Prediction
        2. Performance Monitoring
      2. Technical Applications
        1. Service Innovation
        2. Service Recommendation
    5. A CASE STUDY: IMPROVED WEB SERVICE DISCOVERY
      1. Step 1: Data Pre-Processing
      2. Step 2: Search Session Similarity
      3. Step 3: Clustering of Search Sessions
      4. Experimental Evaluation
    6. CHALLENGES IN PERFORMING DATA MINING TO WEB SERVICES DATA
      1. Data Fusion and Data Collection
      2. Computing Resources
      3. Analysis Results Interpretation
      4. Data Reliability
      5. Proprietary Nature of Data
      6. Privacy and Security
    7. EXISTING WORK
      1. Web Service Discovery
      2. Web Service Log Mining
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
  16. 13. A Reengineering Approach for Ensuring Transactional Reliability of Composite Services
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. TRANSACTIONAL WEB SERVICE MODEL
      1. Transactional Web Service: TWS
      2. Transactional Composite Web Service: TCS
      3. Composition of Transactional Web Services
      4. Control and Transactional Flow of a TCS
      5. Relation between the Control Flow and the Transactional Flow of a TCS
      6. TCS Set of Termination States
    4. PATTERN BASED MODELING
      1. Composition Patterns
      2. Workflow Patterns
      3. Patterns Transactional Potential
      4. TCS Specification
      5. Control Flow Specification
      6. Transactional Flow Specification
    5. WEB SERVICE LOGGING
      1. Web Service Collecting Solutions
      2. Existing Logging Solutions
      3. Advanced Logging Solutions
        1. Identifying Web Service Composition Instances
      4. Collecting Web Service Composition Instance
      5. Web Mining Log Structure
    6. CONTROL FLOW MINING
      1. Construction of the Statistical Dependency Table SDT
      2. Erroneous Dependencies
      3. Undetectable Dependencies
      4. Statistical Specifications of Sequential, Conditional and Concurrent Properties
      5. Patterns Mining
      6. Transactional Flow Mining
      7. Key Idea
      8. Computing Service Transactional Properties Induced by STSwjthFajlure
      9. Computing Transactional Conditions Induced by STSwithFailure
      10. Improving TCS Recovery Mechanisms
    7. RELATED WORK
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
  17. 14. Karma2: Provenance Management for Data-Driven Workflows1
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. MOTIVATION
    4. WORKFLOW MODEL
      1. Paradigms for Workflow Execution and Service Invocation
      2. Resource Naming and Unique IDs
    5. PROVENANCE ACTIVITIES
      1. Activity Dimensions
      2. Activity Types
      3. Example
    6. PROVENANCE MODEL
      1. Process Provenance
      2. Data Provenance
    7. IMPLEMENTATION
      1. Publishing Activities as Notifications
      2. Database Model
      3. Provenance Queries
      4. Provenance Dissemination
    8. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
    9. RELATED WORK
    10. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    12. REFERENCES
    13. ENDNOTE
  18. 15. Result Refinement in Web Services Retrieval Based on Multiple Instances Learning
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. MOTIVATION
      1. The Need to Refine Traditional Web Services Retrieval Results
      2. Why Operations are Important in Refinement
    4. BACKGROUND
      1. Process of Refining Web Services Retrieval
      2. Results Refinement Based on MIL
      3. Extracting Operation's Features Vector
      4. Learning Algorithm Based on MIL: SigO-kNN
    5. CASE STUDY
    6. EXPERIMENTS AND RESULTS
      1. Experiment Setup
      2. Average Performance Analysis
    7. RELATED WORK
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
    11. ENDNOTES
  19. 16. A Model-Driven Development Framework for Non-Functional Aspects in Service Oriented Architecture
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. CONTRIBUTIONS
    4. BACKGROUND AND A MOTIVATING EXAMPLE
    5. DESIGN OF THE PROPOSED UML PROFILE
    6. Connector
      1. Filter
      2. Service
      3. Message
    7. APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT WITH THE PROPOSED MDD FRAMEWORK
      1. Transformation Rules for ESB Applications
      2. Transformation Rules for Secure and Broadband File Transfer Applications
      3. Extensibility of the Proposed MDD Framework
    8. EVALUATION
    9. RELATED WORK
    10. CONCLUSION
    11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    12. REFERENCES
    13. ENDNOTES
  20. 17. Interoperability Among Heterogeneous Services: The Case of Integration of P2P Services with Web Services
    1. Abstract
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. MOTIVATING SCENARIO
    4. INTEROPERABILITY DIMENSIONS
      1. Interoperability Concerns for Heterogeneous Services
    5. GENERIC SERVICE MODEL
      1. The Core Part of GeSMO
      2. GeSMO Extensions for Peer-to-Peer Services
    6. A PEER-TO-PEER SERVICE DESCRIPTION LANGUAGE
      1. PSDL Language Elements
      2. General P2P Service Related PSDL Elements
      3. JXTA Specific PSDL Elements
      4. A PSDL Example
    7. JXTA SERVICE INVOCATION MECHANISM
    8. APPLICATION CASE STUDY
    9. RELATED WORK
    10. CONCLUSION
    11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    12. REFERENCES
    13. ENDNOTES
  21. 18. Service-Oriented Architecture for Migrating Legacy Home Appliances to Home Network System: Principle and Applications
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. PRELIMINARIES
      1. Home Network System (HNS)
      2. Service-Oriented Framework for HNS (Igaki, 2005)
      3. Software Controller for Legacy Appliances
    4. ADAPTING LEGACY HOME APPLIANCES TO HNS
      1. Requirements
      2. Proposed Architecture
      3. IR Device Layer: Providing APIs for Infrared Remote Controller (Ir-APIs)
      4. Service Layer: Aggregating Features as Vendor-Neutral Services
      5. Supplementary Service: Getting Status
      6. Web Service Layer: Exporting Service Methods as Web-APIs
      7. HNS Integrated Services
    5. IMPLEMENTATION: NAIST-HNS
      1. Legacy Appliances Used
      2. Implementation of Legacy Adapter
      3. NAIST-HNS Integrated Services
    6. EVALUATION
      1. Achievements of Requirements
      2. Performance
      3. Productivity
      4. Extendibility
      5. Portability
      6. Maintainability
      7. Limitations
    7. LATEST APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
      1. User Interfaces
      2. End-User Service Creation Environment: BAMBEE(Sekimoto, 2008)
      3. Verbena: Dynamic Service Bindings (Nakamura, 2008)
      4. Integration with Information Resources: RSS Integrated Service (Sakamoto, 2008)
    8. RELATED WORK
    9. CONCLUSION
    10. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    11. REFERENCES
    12. ENDNOTES
  22. 19. Broadening JAIN-SLEE with a Service Description Language and Asynchronous Web Services
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. VALUE ADDED SERVICES IN JAIN-SLEE
    4. JAIN-SLEE Architecture
    5. JAIN-SLEE Component Model
      1. Service Composition with StarSCE
    6. COMMUNICATION WEB SERVICES
      1. From Value Added Service to Communication Web Service
    7. BROADENING JAIN-SLEE WITH STARSDL AND WSN
      1. Service Description Languages
      2. Facing with asynchronous interactions
      3. Service Discovery
    8. CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
  23. 20. Workflow Discovery: Requirements from E-Science and a Graph-Based Solution
    1. Abstract
    2. INTRODUCTION
      1. Problem Statement
      2. Article Contribution and Structure
    3. WORKFLOWS IN E-SCIENCE: A CASE STUDY
      1. Automation
      2. Best Practice
      3. Fault Tolerance
      4. Recording of Provenance
    4. WORKFLOW REUSE VERSUS WEB SERVICE REUSE
    5. TO BPEL OR NOT TO BPEL, IS THAT THE QUESTION?
    6. WORKFLOW DISCOVERY USE CASES
      1. Workflow by Example
      2. Use Cases for Workflow Discovery
    7. REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS: WORKFLOW DISCOVERY CRITERIA
      1. Participants
      2. Materials
      3. Procedure
      4. Results
    8. REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS FOR A WORKFLOW DISCOVERY TOOL
      1. Participants
      2. Materials
      3. Procedure
      4. Results
    9. A WORKFLOW DISCOVERY TOOL
      1. Determining the Scope in Terms of Workflow Discovery Requirements
      2. Choosing the Matching Technology
      3. Tool Overview
    10. EVALUATION
    11. RELATED WORK
      1. Elicitation of Workflow Discovery Requirements and Building a Benchmark
      2. Tools for Ranking the Structural Part of Workflows
    12. CONCLUSION
    13. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    14. REFERENCES
    15. ENDNOTES
  24. 21. An Access Control Framework for WS-BPEL Processes
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. INTRODUCTION TO WS-BPEL
    4. RBAC-WS-BPEL: AN AUTHORIZATION MODEL FOR WS-BPEL
    5. RBAC-XACML-AUTHORIZATION SCHEMA
    6. BCPL-BUSINESS PROCESS CONSTRAINT LANGUAGE
    7. RBAC-WS-BPEL AUTHORIZATION SPECIFICATION
    8. RBAC-WS-BPEL ENFORCEMENT
    9. RBAC-WS-BPEL SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
    10. HANDLING <HUMANACTIVITY> ACTIVITY EXECUTION AND RBAC-WS-BPEL ENFORCEMENT
    11. RELATED WORKS
    12. CONCLUSION
    13. REFERENCES
    14. APPENDIX A
  25. 22. Business Process Control-Flow Complexity: Metric, Evaluation, and Validation
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. MOTIVATION
    4. PROCESS COMPLEXITY
      1. Process Complexity Measurement Requirements
      2. Perspectives on Process Complexity
    5. BUSINESS PROCESS CONTROL-FLOW COMPLEXITY METRIC
      1. Overview of McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity
      2. Control-Flow Graphs
      3. Definition and Measurement of Control-Flow Complexity
      4. Control-Flow Complexity of Business Processes
      5. Example of CFC Calculation
    6. CONTROL-FLOW COMPLEXITY AND WEYUKER'S PROPERTIES
      1. Summary of Weyuker's Properties
      2. Concatenation Operations on Processes
      3. Evaluating the CFC Metric
      4. Interoperability Property
      5. Conclusion
    7. METRIC VALIDATION
      1. Research Context
      2. Hypotheses Formulation
      3. Study Design
      4. Threats to Validity
      5. Data Analysis and Presentation
      6. Results and Conclusion
    8. RELATED WORK
    9. CONCLUSION
    10. REFERENCES
  26. 23. Pattern-Based Translation of BPMN Process Models to BPEL Web Services
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BUSINESS PROCESS EXECUTION LANGUAGE FOR WEB SERVICES (BPEL)
    4. BUSINESS PROCESS MODELLING NOTATION (BPMN)
      1. Business Process Diagrams (BPD)
      2. Abstract Syntax of a BPD
    5. IDENTIFICATION AND TRANSLATION OF BPMN PATTERNS
      1. Decomposing a BPD into Components
      2. Well-Structured Pattern-Based Translation
      3. Quasi-Structured Pattern-Based Translation
      4. Generalized FLOW-Pattern-Based Translation
      5. Translation Algorithm
      6. Complexity Analysis
    6. OVERALL TRANSLATION APPROACH: AN EXAMPLE
    7. RELATED WORK
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
    11. ENDNOTES
  27. 24. DSCWeaver: Synchronization-Constraint Aspect Extension to Procedural Process Specification Languages
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. A MOTIVATING EXAMPLE
    4. DSCWeaver IMPLEMENTATION OVERVIEW
    5. DAG SYNCHRONIZATION CONSTRAINT LANGUAGE
      1. DSCL Features
      2. DSCL Properties
    6. TRANSLATION OF DSCL TO PETRI NETS
      1. Translation from State Relationships to Petri Nets
        1. Step 1:Intrastate Relation Construction
        2. Step 2: Interstate Relation Construction
        3. Step 3: Exclusive Relationship Construction
      2. Validation in CPN Tools
        1. Process 1
        2. Process 2
    7. TRANSLATION OF PETRI NET TO TOKEN MESSAGES
    8. BPEL EXTENSION WITH DSCL
      1. DSCL+ Tags
      2. BPEL Code Weaving
    9. EVALUATION
      1. Development Effort Evaluation
      2. Performance
    10. RELATED WORK
    11. CONCLUSION
    12. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    13. REFERENCES
  28. 25. A Reservation-Based Extended Transaction Protocol for Coordination of Web Services within Business Activities
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. SYSTEM MODEL
    4. THE RESERVATION PROTOCOL
      1. Resource Reservation vs. Locking Resource vs. Resource Request Retry
      2. Operation under Fault Conditions
      3. Mapping to the Web Services Coordination Specification
      4. Use Case
    5. IMPLEMENTATION
      1. Client Middleware
      2. Server Middleware
      3. Reservation Protocol Interactions
    6. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
      1. Request Distributions
      2. Parameters for the Experiments
      3. Reservation Protocol
      4. Two Phase Commit Protocol
      5. Optimistic Two Phase Commit Protocol
      6. Response Time
      7. Throughput
      8. Completion Time
    7. RELATED WORK
    8. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
  29. Compilation of References
  30. About the Contributors