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Web Portals: The New Gateways to Internet Information and Services

Book Description

A Web portal is a special web site designed to act as a gateway giving convenient access to other related sites. This book investigates the various types of portals and describes how they can be used in business applications. After considering the nature of portals, the book describes the first general portals like Yahoo, and how they came into being. Portals are used in businesses of all types and sizes and this book discusses how portals can be used in large business corporations as well as small to medium enterprises. Web portals have increasing importance to marketers as, by their nature, they retain their users who must return to them frequently. They also provide a useful means of making information and knowledge readily available in a convenient form to authorised users. This book covers a wide range of issues relating to the use of portals in business.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface
  3. Portals, Portals Everywhere
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Portals, Portals Everywhere
    4. And All the Web Did Shrink
    5. Nor Any Better Link
    6. Conclusion
    7. References
  4. On Portals: A Parsimonious Approach
    1. Abstract
    2. What Is a Portal?
    3. Technical Components
    4. On Portal Vendors
    5. Conclusions and Closing Observations
    6. Endnotes
    7. References
    8. Appendix
  5. Portal Combat Revisited: Success Factors and Evolution in Consumer Web Portals[1]
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Context—The Web Portal Industry
    4. Influencing Market Dominance
    5. Modelling Portal Combat
    6. Data
    7. Results Summary
    8. Interpretation and Conclusion
    9. Current Environment and Future Directions
    10. Endnotes
    11. References
  6. Competitive Dynamics of General Portals
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Evolution of the General Portal Industry
    4. The Online Value Network
    5. Content Providers and E-commerce
    6. Strategic Challengers for Content Providers and Their Consequences for Horizontal Portals
    7. Internet Service Providers and Internet Access Providers
    8. Conclusions: Possible Future Avenues of Horizontal Portals
    9. Endnotes
    10. References
  7. Portals – Gateways for Marketing
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Portals—A Sneak Preview
    4. Past, Current, and Future Growth of E-Commerce and Portals
    5. The Marketing Function and Portals
    6. Insight into Web and Portal Models for Marketers
    7. Consumer Behaviour at Web Sites and Portals—Some Lessons for Marketers
    8. Conclusion
    9. References
  8. Designing E-Commerce Portal for an Enterprise – A Framework
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Information Management to Knowledge Management
    4. Enterprise-Wide Integrated E-Commerce Portal
    5. Framework for Enterprise-Wide E-Commerce Portal
    6. Conclusion
    7. References
  9. Portals in Large Enterprises
    1. Abstract
    2. What Is an “Enterprise Portal”?
    3. What Is a “Large Enterprise”?
    4. Enterprise Portals
    5. Corporate Information Portals
    6. Product Information Portals
    7. Customer Service Portals
    8. Selling Portals
    9. Supply Chain Portals
    10. Business-to-Employee Portals
    11. Summary
    12. Directions for Further Research
    13. Endnotes
    14. References
  10. Employee Portals: Just the Next Step in the Journey
    1. Abstract
    2. Web Portals
    3. Employee Self-Service (ESS)
    4. Conclusion
    5. References
  11. A Flexible Evaluation Framework for Web Portals Based on Multi-Criteria Analysis
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Background
    4. Evaluation Framework Presentation
    5. Evaluation Process
    6. Application: Go-Digital Web Portal Case
    7. Discussion and Conclusions
    8. Acknowledgment
    9. References
  12. Web Portals in Government Service
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Portal Models
    4. Research Method
    5. Victorian Government Portals
    6. Conclusion
    7. References
  13. Building New Systems for Decision Support in Education: Was There a Baby in That Bathwater?
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Background
    4. What Forms Do Knowledge Management and Decision Support Systems Take?
    5. Why Take an Inventory of Existing Systems?
    6. Methods for Performing a System Inventory
    7. Range of Systems Available
    8. Information Quality as Guiding Principle
    9. Conclusion
    10. Endnotes
    11. References
  14. Educational Portals: A Way to Get an Integrated, User-Centric University Information System
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Portals in Higher-Education Institutions—The Motivation
    4. The Case at the University of Ljubljana
    5. Renovation of the Student Records Information System (SRIS)
    6. Conclusion
    7. References
  15. Intelligent Portals for Supporting Medical Information Needs
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Health Internet Usage
    4. Current Portal Technology
    5. Intelligent Medical Portals
    6. Medical Portals Analysis
    7. Conclusion
    8. References
  16. Portal Services for Older Australians
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Portals
    4. Classification of Portals
    5. Older People and Their Needs
    6. About Seniors, Greypath, and Internet Virtual Communities
    7. Older People and Portal Loyalty: About Seniors and Greypath
    8. Older Person Needs and Portals: Greypath and About Seniors
    9. Discussion and Conclusion
    10. Endnote
    11. References
  17. Functioning Portal Interfaces to Support Knowledge Enabling
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. Portals to Support Knowledge Creation and Sharing
    4. The Role of Portals
    5. KM Portal Design
    6. Enterprise Information Portals, or Corporate Portals
    7. Enterprise Knowledge Portals
    8. Information or Knowledge Portal?
    9. Successful Knowledge Management Using Portals
    10. Portals That Support KM
    11. Features of Successful Portals
    12. How Many Portals is Enough?
    13. Conclusion
    14. References
  18. Developing a Portal to Build a Business Community
    1. Abstract
    2. Introduction
    3. The Beginnings of the Bizewest Portal
    4. Building the Portal
    5. Getting Business to Adopt the Portal
    6. The Demise and Transformation of the Portal
    7. Conclusion
    8. References
  19. About the Authors
  20. Index