You are previewing Web Form Design.

Web Form Design

Cover of Web Form Design by Luke Wroblewski Published by Rosenfeld Media
  1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O'Reilly
  2. How to Use this Book
    1. Who Should Read this Book?
    2. What’s in the Book?
    3. What Comes with the Book?
  3. Frequently asked Questions
  4. Foreword
  5. Chapter 1
    1. The Design of Forms
      1. Form Design Matters
      2. The Impact of Form Design
      3. Design Considerations
  6. Chapter 2
    1. Form Organization
      1. What to Include
      2. Have a Conversation
      3. Organizing Content
      4. Group Distinctions
      5. Best Practices
  7. Chapter 3
    1. Path to Completion
      1. Name That Form
      2. Start Pages
      3. Clear Scan Lines
      4. Minimal Distractions
      5. Progress Indicators
      6. Tabbing
      7. Best Practices
  8. Chapter 4
    1. Labels
      1. Label Alignment
      2. Top-Aligned Labels
      3. Right-Aligned Labels
      4. Left-Aligned Labels
      5. Labels Within Inputs
      6. Mixed Alignments
      7. Best Practices
  9. Chapter 5
    1. Input Fields
      1. Types of Input Fields
      2. Field Lengths
      3. Required Fields
      4. Input Groups
      5. Flexible Inputs
      6. Best Practices
  10. Chapter 6
    1. Actions
      1. Primary and Secondary Actions
      2. Placement
      3. Actions in Progress
      4. Agree and Submit
      5. Best Practices
  11. Chapter 7
    1. Help Text
      1. When to Help
      2. Automatic Inline Help
      3. User-Activated Inline Help
      4. User-Activated Section Help
      5. Secure Transactions
      6. Best Practices
  12. Chapter 8
    1. Errors and Success
      1. Errors
      2. Success
      3. No Dead Ends
      4. Best Practices
  13. Chapter 9
    1. Inline Validation
      1. Confirmation
      2. Suggestions
      3. Limits
      4. Best Practices
  14. Chapter 10
    1. Unnecessary Inputs
      1. Removing Questions
      2. Smart Defaults
      3. Personalized Defaults
      4. Best Practices
  15. Chapter 11
    1. Additional Inputs
      1. Inline Additions
      2. Overlays
      3. Progressive Engagement
      4. Best Practices
  16. Chapter 12
    1. Selection-Dependent Inputs
      1. Page-Level Selection
      2. Horizontal Tabs
      3. Vertical Tabs
      4. Drop-Down List
      5. Expose Below Radio Buttons
      6. Expose Within Radio Buttons
      7. Exposed Inactive
      8. Exposed Groups
      9. Best Practices
  17. Chapter 13
    1. Gradual Engagement
      1. Signing Up
      2. Getting Engaged
      3. Best Practices
  18. Chapter 14
    1. What’s Next?
      1. The Disappearing Form
      2. The Changing Form
      3. Getting It Built
  19. Acknowledgments
  20. About the Author
  21. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O'Reilly
O'Reilly logo

Chapter 1

The Design of Forms

Form Design Matters

The Impact of Form Design

Design Considerations

Forms suck. If you don’t believe me, try to find people who like filling them in. You may turn up an accountant who gets a rush when wrapping up a client’s tax return or perhaps a desk clerk who loves to tidy up office payroll. But for most of us, forms are just an annoyance. What we want to do is to vote, apply for a job, buy a book online, join a group, or get a rebate back from a recent purchase. Forms just stand in our way.

It doesn’t help that most forms are designed from the “inside out” instead of the “outside in.”[1] Usually inside of an organization or a computer database, a specific set of information has come to define a valid record ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.