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Web Content Management

Book Description

Looking to select a web content management system (CMS), but confused about the promises, terminology, and buzzwords? Do you want to understand content management without having to dive into the underlying programming? This book provides a clear, unbiased overview of the entire CMS ecosystem—from platforms to implementations—in a language- and platform-agnostic manner for project managers, executives, and new developers alike.

Table of Contents

  1. Foreword
  2. Preface
    1. Who Is This Book For?
    2. What Is Not in This Book?
    3. How Is This Book Organized?
    4. A Note on Generalities
    5. A Note on Nomenclature
    6. A Note on Sidebars
    7. A Note on Bias
    8. Conventions Used in This Book
    9. Safari® Books Online
    10. How to Contact Us
    11. Acknowledgments
  3. I. The Basics
  4. 1. What Content Management Is (and Isn’t)
    1. What Is Content?
      1. Created by Humans via Editorial Process
      2. Intended for Human Consumption via Publication to an Audience
      3. A Definition of Content
    2. What Is a Content Management System?
      1. The Discipline Versus the Software
    3. Types of Content Management Systems
    4. What a CMS Does
      1. Control Content
      2. Allow Content Reuse
      3. Allow Content Automation and Aggregation
      4. Increase Editorial Efficiency
    5. What a CMS Doesn’t Do
      1. Create Content
      2. Create Marketing Plans
      3. Effectively Format Content
      4. Provide Governance
  5. 2. Points of Comparison
    1. Target Site Type
    2. Systems Versus Implementations
    3. Platform Versus Product
    4. Open Source Versus Commercial
    5. Technology Stack
    6. Management Versus Delivery
    7. Coupled Versus Decoupled
    8. Installed Versus Software-as-a-Service (SaaS)
    9. Code Versus Content
    10. Code Versus Configuration
    11. Uni- Versus Bidirectional Publishing
    12. Practicality Versus Elegance, and the Problem of Technical Debt
  6. 3. Acquiring a CMS
    1. Open Source CMSs
      1. Business Models of Open Source Companies
    2. Commercial CMSs
      1. Licensing Models
      2. Software Subscription
    3. Software-as-a-Service
    4. Build Your Own
    5. Questions to Ask
  7. 4. The Content Management Team
    1. Editors
    2. Site Planners
    3. Developers
    4. Administrators
    5. Stakeholders
  8. II. The Components of Content Management Systems
  9. 5. CMS Feature Analysis
    1. The Difficulties of Feature Analysis
      1. “Fitness to Purpose”
      2. “Do Everything” Syndrome
      3. The Whole Is Greater than the Sum of Its Parts
      4. Implementation Details Matter
    2. An Overview of CMS Features
  10. 6. Content Modeling
    1. Data Modeling 101
    2. Data Modeling and Content Management
    3. Separating Content and Presentation
      1. The “Page-Based” CMS
    4. Defining a Content Model
      1. Content Types
      2. Attributes and Datatypes
      3. Built-in Attributes
      4. Attribute Validation
      5. Using Attributes for Editorial Metadata
      6. Content Type Inheritance
      7. Content Embedding
    5. Relationships
    6. Content Composition
    7. Content Model Manageability
    8. A Summary of Content Modeling Features
  11. 7. Content Aggregation
    1. The Shape of Content
    2. Content Geography
      1. Editorial Limitations on Geography
      2. Secondary Geographies: Categories, Taxonomies, Tags, Lists, Collections, and Menus
      3. The Tyranny of the Tree
    3. Aggregation Models: Implicit and Explicit
      1. Should Your Aggregation Be a Content Object?
      2. The URL Addressability of Aggregations
    4. Aggregation Functionality
      1. Static Versus Dynamic
      2. Variable Versus Fixed
      3. Manual Ordering Versus Derived Ordering
      4. Type Limitations
      5. Quantity Limitations
      6. Permissions and Publication Status Filters
      7. Flat Versus Hierarchical
      8. Interstitial Aggregations
    5. By Configuration or by Code
    6. A Summary of Content Aggregation Features
  12. 8. Editorial Tools and Workflow
    1. The Content Lifecycle
    2. The Editing Interface
      1. Content Findability and Traversal
      2. Type Selection
      3. Content Preview
      4. Editing Interface Elements
    3. Versioning, Version Control, and Version Labels
    4. Dependency Management
    5. Content Scheduling and Expiration
      1. Changeset Publication
      2. Content Expiration
    6. Workflow and Approvals
      1. Approvals
      2. Workflow
    7. Collaboration
    8. Content File Management
      1. Adding Content Files
      2. Content Association
      3. Image Processing
    9. Permissions
    10. A Summary of Editorial Tools
      1. Content Traversal and Navigation
      2. Type Selection
      3. Content Preview
      4. The Editing Interface
      5. Versioning, Version Control, Scheduling, and Expiration
      6. Workflow and Approvals
      7. Content File Management
      8. Permissions
  13. 9. Output and Publication Management
    1. The Difference Between Content and Presentation
    2. Templating
      1. Templating Philosophy
      2. Templating Language Functionality
      3. The Surround
      4. Template Selection
      5. Template Abstraction and Inclusion
      6. Template Development and Management
      7. Responsive Design and Output Agnosticism
    3. Publishing Content
      1. Coupled Versus Decoupled Content Management
      2. Decoupled Publishing Targets
    4. A Summary of Output Management and Publication Features
      1. Architecture
      2. Templating
      3. Decoupled Publishing
  14. 10. Other Features
    1. Multiple Language Handling
      1. Nomenclature
      2. Language Detection and Selection
    2. Language Rules
      1. Language Variants
      2. Beyond Text
      3. Editorial Workflow and Interface Support
      4. External Translation Service Support
    3. Personalization, Analytics, and Marketing Automation
      1. Anonymous Personalization
      2. Analytics Integration
      3. Marketing Automation and CRM Integration
    4. Form Building
      1. Form Editing Interfaces
      2. Form Data Handling
    5. URL Management
      1. Historical URLs, Vanity URLs, and Custom Redirects
    6. Multisite Management
    7. Reporting Tools and Dashboards
    8. Content Search
    9. User and Developer Ecosystem
  15. 11. APIs and Extensibility
    1. The Code API
      1. Event Models
    2. Plug-in Architectures
    3. Customizing the Editorial Interface
      1. Customizing Rich Text Editors
    4. Repository Abstraction
    5. Pluggable Authentication
    6. Web Services
    7. Scheduled or On-Demand Jobs
  16. III. Implementations
  17. 12. The CMS Implementation
    1. Principle Construction Versus Everything Else
    2. Types of Implementations
    3. Preimplementation
      1. Discovery and Preimplementation Artifacts
      2. Developing the Technical Plan
    4. The Implementation Process
      1. Environment Setup
      2. Installation, Configuration, and Content Reconciliation
      3. Content Modeling, Aggregation Modeling, and Rough-in
      4. Early Content Migration
      5. Templating
      6. Non-Content Integration and Development
      7. Production Environment Planning and Setup
      8. Training and Support Planning
      9. Final Content Migration, QA, and Launch
  18. 13. Content Migration
    1. The Editorial Challenge
    2. Automated or Manual?
    3. The Migration Process
      1. Extraction
      2. Transformation
      3. Reassembly
      4. Import
      5. Resolution
      6. QA
    4. Migration Script Development
      1. Content Velocity and Migration Timing
    5. A Final Word of Warning
  19. 14. Working with External Integrators
    1. Engagement Models
      1. CMS Vendor Professional Services
    2. Sales and Scoping
      1. Preimplementation Artifacts
    3. Costs
    4. Written Agreements
      1. The Statement of Work
    5. Production
      1. Team Proximity and Dedication
      2. Development and Testing Infrastructure
      3. Project Communication and Check-in
      4. Work Acceptance and QA
      5. Content Development
    6. Training and Support
    7. A Final Word
  20. 15. Where Content Management Is Going
    1. Fewer Open Source CMSs Will Get Traction
    2. Decoupling Will Make a Comeback
    3. Focus on Marketing Tools and Integration Will Increase
    4. Entry-Level SaaS Will Eat Away the Lower End of the Market
    5. Multichannel Distribution Will Increase
    6. Distributed Content Intake Will Start to Grow
  21. Afterword
    1. Next Steps
  22. Index