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Web-Based Green Products Life Cycle Management Systems: Reverse Supply Chain Utilization

Book Description

Web-Based Green Products Life Cycle Management Systems: Reverse Supply Chain Utilization provides a comprehensive review of current and potential research in green management and control. This book is a must-have for new and experienced researchers, as well as practitioners and academicians alike.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. List of Reviewers
  3. Foreword
  4. Preface
    1. ADDITIONAL READINGS
  5. Acknowledgment
  6. I. Life Cycle Assessment: Concept and Practice
    1. I. Life Cycle Design, Planning, and Assessment
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. BACKGROUND
      3. HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT
      4. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY
      5. ILLUSTRATIVE CASE: PRODUCTION OF BIOFUELS FROM AGRICULTURAL CROPS
      6. FUTURE TRENDS AND RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      9. REFERENCES
      10. ADDITIONAL READING
    2. A. APPENDIX: SUMMARY OF COMPUTATIONAL ASPECTS OF LCA
        1. Process-Based Life Cycle Inventory Analysis (LCI)
        2. Economic Input-Output-Based Inventory Analysis
        3. Life Cycle Impact Assessment
    3. II. Industrial Metabolism: Materials and Energy Flow Studies
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY AND INDUSTRIAL METABOLISM
        1. The Origin of Industrial Ecology
        2. Industrial Metabolism
        3. Industrial symbiosis and Process Integration
      4. BASIC CONCEPTS OF INDUSTRIAL METABOLISM
        1. Systems Approach
          1. System and Universe
          2. System Structure
          3. Physical Systems
        2. Technosystem and Ecosystem
        3. Life-Cycle Approach
          1. Introduction
          2. Origin of the Life-Cycle Approach
      5. GLOBAL PHYSICAL FLOWS
        1. Cycles in the Ecosystem
        2. Anthropogenic Materials Flows
        3. Global Energy Flows
      6. PHYSICAL FLOWS IN INDUSTRY
        1. Introduction
        2. Processes
        3. Physical Flows
          1. Introduction
          2. Resources
          3. Utilities
          4. Products
          5. Wastes or Residual Products
      7. PRODUCT-PROCESS CHAIN
        1. Process Disaggregation
        2. Production Processes
        3. Consumption processes
        4. End-of-Pipe Processes
      8. THE REVERSE PRODUCT-PROCESS CHAIN
        1. Introduction
        2. Waste Prevention Measures
          1. Process and Product Improvement
          2. Optimal Use of Residual Flows
        3. Processing of Product Waste
        4. Influence of Recycling on Extraction and Discharge
      9. ENERGY TRANSFORMATIONS
        1. Introduction
        2. Energy Forms and Kinds
      10. GROSS ENERGY REQUIREMENT (GER)
        1. Backgrounds
        2. Allocation Problems
        3. Energy Analysis: Beet Sugar Industry
          1. The Production Process
          2. Energy Analysis
            1. Introduction
            2. Sugar Beets Growing
            3. GER of Dried Pulp
            4. GER of Molasses and Sugar
          3. Energy Conservation Measures
      11. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT (LCA) AND ECO-INDICATOR
        1. Backgrounds
        2. Basic Methodology
        3. Eco-Indicator
        4. Advantages and Drawbacks
      12. MATHEMATICAL MODELS AND SOFTWARE TOOLS
      13. CASES
        1. Packaging Industry: Laminated foil
        2. Packaging Industry: Reels in the Electronics Industries
        3. Truck Manufacturing: Anticipating Future Legislation
      14. FUTURE TRENDS
      15. CONCLUSION
      16. REFERENCES
      17. ADDITIONAL READING
    4. III. Sustainability Constraints as System Boundaries: Introductory Steps Toward Strategic Life-Cycle Management
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
        1. A Troubled History
        2. A Complex Mix of Tools and Methods
        3. Moving Forward with Strategic Life-cycle Management
      3. BACKCASTING FROM BASIC SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES
      4. RATIONALE FOR STRATEGIC LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT
        1. The Dynamics of Dematerialization and Substitution Under Each Sustainability Principle
        2. Practical Experiences from Applying Backcasting from Sustainability Principles
        3. The Electrolux Example: Solving Existing Problems While Planning for the Future
        4. The IKEA Example: Negotiating Trade-Offs When Introducing Low Energy Lamps
        5. The Hydro Polymers Example: Redefining Business Challenges by Backcasting from Sustainability Principles
        6. The Complexity of Making Detailed Priorities
      5. PRELIMINARY GUIDELINES FOR STRATEGIC LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT
        1. Experience from Management of Complex Systems
        2. Desired Features of Strategic Life-Cycle Management
          1. Goal/Scope
          2. Inventory Analysis
          3. Impact Assessment
          4. Results Interpretation and Improvement Assessment
        3. Introductory Steps Toward Strategie Life-Cycle Management
        4. Future Steps Toward Strategic Life-Cycle Management
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      8. REFERENCES
      9. ADDITIONAL READING
        1. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA)
        2. Backcasting
        3. A Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD)
        4. Established Sustainable Development Tools and Concepts in Relation to FSSD
        5. Policy Applications of FSSD
        6. Industrial Applications of FSSD
    5. IV. Environmental Criteria in a MCDM Context
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CRITERIA, ATTRIBUTES, OBJECTIVES, GOALS, AND INDICATORS
        1. Definition and Characteristics of Criteria
        2. Threshold vs. Evaluation Criteria
        3. Relation to Attributes, Objectives, Goals, and Indicators
        4. Definition and Representation of Criteria
        5. Characteristics of Environmental Criteria
      4. WEIGHTING OF CRITERIA
      5. SELECTION OF CRITERIA
      6. ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE
      7. IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS OF RESEARCH AND FUTURE TRENDS
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ADDITIONAL READING
    6. V. Sustainable Electronic Product Design: A Comparison of Environmental Performance Assessment Tools Derived from Life Cycle Thinking
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. BACKGROUND
      3. MOTIVATIONS FOR METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT
      4. OVERVIEW OF METHODS
        1. Type I: Simplified Industrial Approaches
          1. Materials Flow Indicators
          2. Energy Flow Indicators
          3. Checklists
        2. Type II: Mid-Level Collaborative Approaches
          1. Design for Environment (DfE) Aid Tools
          2. End-Of-Life (EOL) Oriented Tools
          3. Benchmarking Type Tools
        3. Type III: Comprehensive Academic Approaches
      5. SOCIETAL IMPETUS TO INFLUENCE THE DIRECTION OF METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT
        1. International Legislative Focus and Orientation
        2. Regional Compliance and Societal Implications
          1. European Union (EU)
          2. Japan
          3. South Korea
          4. The United States
          5. China
      6. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
        1. Selection of Appropriate Impact Indicators
        2. Assessment of Economic Impacts
        3. Integrated Methodology and Interdisciplinary Collaboration
        4. Aggregation of Different Environmental Impacts into a Single Value Environmental Performance Score
        5. The Integration of Trade-Offs Between Environmental, Economic, and Technical Aspects of Product Systems
        6. Information Declaration and Database Management
        7. Uncertainty Check and Sensitivity Analysis
        8. Peer Review
        9. Teaching Sustainable Product Assessment Methods
      7. CONCLUSION AND FURTHER DIRECTIONS
      8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      9. REFERENCES
      10. ADDITIONAL READING
    7. VI. From Cleaner Production to Greening the Local Economy: A Case Study of Two European Programs Enhancing SMEs Competitiveness Through Environmental Approaches
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. ACTIVITIES OF EFA NRW FOR CLEANER PRODUCTION
        1. The Establishment of EFA/NRW and the Concept of the PlUS-Check
        2. Example of the Enterprises that Participated in the PlUS-Check
          1. Company A: Metal Working
        3. Review of EFA's Attempts
        4. ACTIVITIES OF THE EcoBusinessPlan Vienna (EBP)
        5. The Concept of the EBP Vienna
        6. Case of an Enterprise that Participated in EBP Vienna
          1. Company D: Catering Service
        7. Related Programs in the Vienna City
        8. Review of the Programs in the Vienna City
      4. DISCUSSIONS AND IMPLICATION: TOWARD GREENING THE LOCAL ECONOMY
      5. CONCLUSION
      6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
        1. Regional Policy Perspective
        2. Industrial Cluster and Economic Development Perspective
        3. Strategic CSR Perspective
      7. REFERENCES
      8. ADDITIONAL READING
      9. ENDNOTES
  7. II. Demand and Service Chain Management
    1. VII. Does Trust Foster Sustainability? Results from a Management Simulation Game
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. TRUST AND GREEN SUPPLY CHAINS
        1. Different Kinds of Trust
        2. Trust and Performance
        3. Measuring Environmental Impact of Supply Chains
      4. RESEARCH FRAMEWORK AND GAME SET UP
      5. RESULTS OF THE LOBUS++ AUTOMOTIVE PARTS CASE
        1. Performance and Sustainability
        2. The Impact of Trust
        3. Propositions Formulated
      6. RESULTS OF THE CUCUMBER CASE
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. FUTURE TRENDS AND FURTHER READING
      9. REFERENCES
      10. FURTHER READING
    2. B. APPENDIX I. THE GENERIC SIMULATION MODEL OF THE NETCHAIN GAME
      1. Model Structure
      2. Game Set-Up
      3. Game Phases
    3. C. APPENDIX II. THE NCG LOBUS ++ CASE
    4. D. APPENDIX III. PARTICIPANT QUESTIONNAIRE
      1. Key Problem Statement:
      2. Research Questions:
    5. E. APPENDIX IV. MANAGEMENT GAMES OVERVIEW
    6. F. APPENDIX V. CUCUMBER CASE DESCRIPTION
      1. Plant-Growers
      2. Corporation
      3. Retailers
      4. Triangular Transparency
      5. Tactical Phase
      6. Decisions
        1. Plant-Growers
          1. Tactical Decisions
          2. Operational Decisions
        2. Corporation
          1. Tactical Decisions
          2. Operational Decisions
        3. Retailers
          1. Tactical Decisions
          2. Operational Decisions
      7. Key Performance Indicators
        1. Logistical KPIs
        2. Environmental KPIs
        3. Financial KPIs
        4. Social KPIs
        5. The Balance Sheet
      8. Real-Time Simulation: Operations Phase
    7. VIII. Identifying and Clustering of Target Customers of Green Products
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
        1. Supply-Derived Market
        2. Customer Features and Classification
        3. Multiattribute Utility Theory and Weight Elicitation
        4. Nonlinear Programming
      4. METHODOLOGY
        1. Data Collection
        2. Clustering Analysis
        3. Utility Function Construction
        4. Weight Elicitation
        5. Bi-Objective Model Construction
        6. Solution Procedure of the Nonlinear Problem
      5. CLUSTERING ANALYSIS OF CASE STUDY
        1. Questionnaire Content and Hypotheses
        2. Measure Construction
        3. Measure Validation and Reliability
        4. Clustering Analysis
      6. PRICE SETTING FOR THE TARGET CUSTOMERS
        1. Utility Function Construction of an HEV
        2. Bi-Objective Model Construction of an HEV
        3. Optimal Solutions with Sensitivity Analysis
        4. Optimal Price Setting and The Target Customer Identification
        5. Promotion Strategies
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ADDITIONAL READING
    8. IX. Application of Fuzzy Analytic Network Process and Fuzzy TOPSIS to the Undesirable Location Selection Problem
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE PURPOSE OF THE CHAPTER
      4. FUZZY THEORY
      5. FUZZY ANALYTIC NETWORK PROCESS
      6. FUZZY TOPSIS
      7. APPLICATION OF TRANSFER STATION SELECTION
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ADDITIONAL READING
    9. X. Sustainable Product Service Systems: Potential to Deliver Business and Social Benefits with Less Resource Use
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE CHALLENGE: ECONOMIC GROWTH WITH LESS RESOURCE USE
      4. PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP AND TAKE-BACK SCHEMES
      5. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT SERVICE SYSTEMS
      6. THE HP "SERVICE SOLUTION"
        1. Some Examples of HP Service Solution
        2. Fleet Management
        3. From PSS to S-PSS
        4. Energy Saving Settings
      7. FUTURE DIRECTIONS
      8. OTHER APPLICATIONS AND WIDER POTENTIAL
      9. RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA
        1. The Interface Approach
        2. Methodology
        3. Findings
        4. Research with HP
      10. CLOSING COMMENTS
      11. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      12. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      13. REFERENCES
      14. ADDITIONAL READING
    10. XI. Strategic Decisions for Green Electricity Marketing: Learning from Past Experiences
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
        1. The Willingness to Pay for Green Electricity
        2. Green Electricity Programs Across the World
      4. STRATEGIC DECISIONS
        1. Basic Design of the Program
        2. Renewable Electricity Types
        3. Customer Demand Coverage
        4. Energy Purchases
          1. Wholesale Market
          2. Bilateral Contracts
          3. Vertical Integration
          4. Tradable Green Certificate (TGC) Systems
        5. Target Clients
        6. Premiums
        7. Value Creation
        8. Information to Customers
        9. Credibility
        10. Relationship with Other RE Support Schemes
      5. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
      6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      8. REFERENCES
      9. ADDITIONAL READING
  8. III. Supply Chain and Logistics Management
    1. XII. Modeling of Green Supply Chain Logistics
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. MAIN THRUST OF THE CHAPTER
        1. Integer Linear Programming
        2. Numerical Example
        3. Sensitivity Analysis for Recovery and Land-Filling Rates
      5. FURTURE TRENDS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      8. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
      9. REFERENCES
      10. ADDITIONAL READING
    2. XIII. Reverse Supply Chain Design: A Neural Network Approach
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. MOTIVATION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
      4. TECHNIQUES USED IN THIS CHAPTER
        1. Fuzzy Set Theory
          1. Linguistic Values and Fuzzy Sets
          2. Triangular Fuzzy Numbers
          3. Defuzzification
        2. TOPSIS Method
        3. Borda's Choice Rule
      5. EVALUATION OF EFFICIENCIES OF COLLECTION FACILITIES
        1. Phase-I of the Approach
        2. Phase-II of the Approach
        3. Phase-III of the Approach
        4. Phase-IV of the Approach
      6. EVALUATION OF EFFICIENCIES OF RECOVERY FACILITIES
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. FUTURE RESEARCH
      9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ADDITIONAL READING
    3. XIV. System Dynamics Modeling for Strategic Management of Green Supply Chain
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
        1. Classification Based on Problem Context
          1. Strategic Management
          2. Green Design
          3. Green Operations
          4. Classification Based on Approach
          5. Empirical Studies
          6. Mathematical Modeling
      4. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY
      5. QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PMS
        1. Business Object Models (BOMs)
          1. Organization View
          2. Function View
          3. Info View
          4. Output View
        2. Coupling Operation Models (COMs)
          1. The Select Operator
          2. The Project Operator
          3. Composition of Coupling Operator
          4. The Cartesian-Product Operator
          5. The Naming Operator
          6. The Associative Operator
        3. System Dynamics Models (SDMs)
        4. Model Variables
        5. Cause-Effect Diagram
        6. Mathematical Formulation
      6. ILLUSTRATIVE CASE
      7. CONCLUDING REMARKS
      8. FUTURE DIRECTION
      9. ADDITIONAL READING
      10. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      11. REFERENCES
    4. XV. A Vehicle Routing and Scheduling Model for a Distribution Center
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
        1. Vehicle Routing and Scheduling Problems (VRSP)
      4. SOLUTION APPROACH
        1. Genetic Algorithm
        2. Tabu Search
        3. Comparison of These Two Meta-Heuristics
      5. DISCUSSION AND SUMMARY
          1. Distribution Model
        1. Model for VRSP-MVMT
        2. Linearization of VRSP-MVMT
          1. Illustrative Example I
          2. Illustrative Example II
        3. Comparison and Discussion
        4. Summary
      6. A GENETIC ALGORITHM FOR VRSP-MVMT
        1. The Proposed GA
        2. The Structure of the Algorithm
        3. Illustration of the Procedure
      7. STAGE 0. REPRESENTATION
      8. STAGE 1. INITIALIZATION
      9. STAGE 2. CROSSOVER
      10. STAGE 3. MUTATION
      11. STAGE 4. FIX
      12. STAGE 5. EVALUATION
      13. STAGE 6. SELECTION
      14. STAGE 7. TERMINATION
        1. Evaluation
          1. Evaluation of Accuracy
          2. Evaluation of Efficiency
      15. SUMMARY
      16. CONCLUSION
        1. Future Trends
      17. REFERENCES
      18. ADDITIONAL READING
    5. G. APPENDIX I GA PROCEDURE
      1. STAGE 0. REPRESENTATION
      2. STAGE 1. INITIALIZATION
      3. STAGE 2. CROSSOVER
      4. STAGE 3. MUTATION
      5. STAGE 4. FIX
      6. STAGE 5. EVALUATION
      7. STAGE 6. SELECTION
      8. STAGE 7. TERMINATION
    6. H. APPENDIX II BENCHMARK DATA R205
    7. XVI. A Data Envelopment Analysis Approach for Household Appliances and Automobile Recycling
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. INTRODUCTION TO DATA ENVELOPMENT ANALYSIS APPROACH
      5. DEA APPLICATION TO END-OF-LIFE DECISION MAKING PROCESS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. FUTURE RESEARCH
      8. REFERENCES
      9. ADDITIONAL READING
  9. IV. Web-Based Management Technology
    1. XVII. Green Product Retrieval and Recommendations System
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM
        1. The Trend of E-Business
        2. Introduction to Green Information Systems
      3. DESIGN OF THE CUSTOMER-ORIENTED RETRIEVAL SYSTEM
        1. Basic Concept of Information Retrieval
        2. Weight-Based Information Retrieval System Design
        3. An Example for Green Products Retrieval
      4. RECOMMENDING SYSTEM DESIGN FOR BOTH CUSTOMER AND PRODUCER
        1. Concepts of Recommenders
        2. Green Products Recommender Design for Both Customers and Producers
        3. An Example of Green Recommendation
      5. CONCLUDING REMARKS
        1. Future Research Directions
      6. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      7. REFERENCES
      8. ADDITIONAL READING
    2. I. APPENDIX: THE DETAILED ALGORITHM OF SECTION 2.2
      1. Step 1. Initialization
      2. Step 2. Compute weight matrix
      3. Step 3. Make a query through online interface.
      4. Step 4. Retrieve documents
      5. Step 5. Adjust the amount of results
      6. Step 6. Update weight values and keywords set
    3. XVIII. Applying Web-Based Collaborative Decision-Making in Reverse Logistics: The Case of Mobile Phones
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. PARAMETERS AFFECTING REVERSE LOGISTICS OPERATION
        1. Product-Dependent parameters
        2. Organizational Parameters
        3. Social Parameters
      4. THE REVERSE SUPPLY CHAIN OF MOBILE PHONES IN GREECE
        1. Facts
        2. Major Concerns
        3. The Decision-Making Situation
      5. A WEB-BASED TOOL FOR COLLABORATIVE DECISION-MAKING
        1. Approaching Conflicting Decision-Making Situations
        2. The Web-Based Tool
      6. ASSESSING THE OPERATION OF THE REVERSE SUPPLY CHAIN OF MOBILE PHONES IN THE CASE OF GREECE
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ADDITIONAL READING
  10. Compilation of References
  11. About the Contributors