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Web 2.0 Architectures by Duane Nickull, Dion Hinchcliffe, James Governor

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Chapter 6. From Models to Patterns

“Something intended to serve, or that may serve, as a pattern of something to be made; a material representation or embodiment of an ideal.”

Dic.die.net

Who should be interested in design patterns? Just about everybody who’s interested in the Web 2.0 phenomenon, including:

  • Business or enterprise analysts

  • Those responsible for the operation of an enterprise

  • Systems analysts

  • Developers and web designers

  • Entrepreneurs

  • Architects of applications and commercial software

  • You

With the approach to patterns in this book, there is room for decision makers and engineers to view the business from different perspectives. Documenting key patterns is a great way to facilitate the requirements-gathering process when embarking on any project. The architectural patterns metamodel outlined in this chapter should help guide you in the definition of the logical boundaries of a solution.

Patterns represent knowledge and provide a way to convey what’s really going on in a given system. Documenting the patterns behind web portals (particularly, Web 2.0 design patterns) is therefore a logical step toward understanding what Web 2.0 really is.

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