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WCDMA Design Handbook

Book Description

Developed out of a successful professional engineering course, this practical handbook was originally published in 2005, and provides a comprehensive explanation of the Wideband CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) air interface of 3rd generation UMTS cellular systems. The book addresses all aspects of the design of the WCDMA radio interface from the lower layers to the upper layers of the protocol architecture. It considers each of the layers in turn, to build a complete understanding of the design and operation of the WCDMA radio interface including the physical layer, RF and baseband processing, MAC, RLC, PDCP/BMP, Non-Access stratum and RRC. An ideal course book and reference for professional engineers, undergraduate and graduate students.

Table of Contents

  1. Coverpage
  2. WCDMA Design Handbook
  3. Title page
  4. Copyright page
  5. Dedication
  6. Contents
  7. Preface
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. List of abbreviations
  10. 1 Introduction
    1. 1.1 Concepts and terminology
    2. 1.2 Major concepts behind UMTS
    3. 1.3 Release 99 (R99) network architecture
    4. 1.4 R4 and R5 network architecture
    5. 1.5 Services provided by UMTS and their evolution from GSM/GPRS services
    6. 1.6 Summary
  11. 2 WCDMA in a nutshell
    1. 2.1 Protocol architecture
    2. 2.2 SAPs
    3. 2.3 Principles of the physical layer
    4. 2.4 Principles of the upper layers
    5. 2.5 Radio and data connections
    6. 2.6 Security issues
    7. 2.7 Summary of the operation of the radio interface
  12. 3 Spreading codes and modulation
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Introducing WCDMA spreading functions
    3. 3.3 Channelisation codes
    4. 3.4 Scrambling codes
    5. 3.5 Modulation
    6. 3.6 Downlink spreading and modulation
    7. 3.7 Uplink spreading and modulation
  13. 4 Physical layer
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Physical channel mapping
    3. 4.3 Uplink channels
    4. 4.4 Downlink channels
    5. 4.5 Spreading and scrambling codes
    6. 4.6 Cell timing
    7. 4.7 PRACH timing and CPCH timing
    8. 4.8 Summary
  14. 5 RF aspects
    1. 5.1 Frequency issues
    2. 5.2 UE transmitter specifications
    3. 5.3 Node B transmitter specifications
    4. 5.4 Received signals
    5. 5.5 Node B receiver characteristics
    6. 5.6 Node B receiver performance
    7. 5.7 UE receiver characteristics
    8. 5.8 UE receiver performance tests
    9. 5.9 UMTS transceiver architecture study
  15. 6 Chip rate processing functions
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Analogue to digital converter (ADC)
    3. 6.3 Receive filtering
    4. 6.4 Rake receiver overview
    5. 6.5 Channel estimation
    6. 6.6 Searcher
    7. 6.7 Initial system acquisition
  16. 7 Symbol rate processing functions
    1. 7.1 WCDMA symbol rate transmission path
    2. 7.2 Convolutional error correction codes
    3. 7.3 Turbo codes as used in WCDMA
    4. 7.4 The performance of the WCDMA turbo code via examples
  17. 8 Layer 2 – medium access control (MAC)
    1. 8.1 MAC introduction
    2. 8.2 MAC architecture
    3. 8.3 MAC functions and services
    4. 8.4 MAC PDUs and primitives
    5. 8.5 MAC operation
    6. 8.6 Random access procedure
    7. 8.7 Control of CPCH
    8. 8.8 TFC selection in uplink in UE
  18. 9 Layer 2 – RLC
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 TM
    3. 9.3 UM
    4. 9.4 AM
    5. 9.5 Summary
  19. 10 PDCP and BMC protocols
    1. 10.1 PDCP architecture and operation
    2. 10.2 Broadcast/multicast control
    3. 10.3 CBS PDU summary
    4. 10.4 Summary
  20. 11 Layer 3 – RRC
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 System information broadcasting
    3. 11.3 Paging and DRX
    4. 11.4 RRC connection establishment
    5. 11.5 Direct transfer procedure
    6. 11.6 RB setup
    7. 11.7 Handover
    8. 11.8 Miscellaneous RRC procedures
    9. 11.9 Summary
  21. 12 Measurements
    1. 12.1 Introduction
    2. 12.2 Measurement control
    3. 12.3 Measurement variables
    4. 12.4 Cell signal measurement procedures
    5. 12.5 Reporting the measurement results
    6. 12.6 Measurements for interoperation with GSM
    7. 12.7 Location services measurements
    8. 12.8 Summary
  22. 13 NAS
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 NAS architecture
    3. 13.3 MS classes and network modes
    4. 13.4 MM protocol entity
    5. 13.5 Call control protocol
    6. 13.6 GMM protocol states
    7. 13.7 GMM procedures
    8. 13.8 SM protocol and PDP contexts
    9. 13.9 SMS protocol
  23. 14 Idle mode functions
    1. 14.1 USIM architecture and operation
    2. 14.2 Idle mode overview
    3. 14.3 Idle mode substate machine
    4. 14.4 NAS idle mode functions and interrelationship
    5. 14.5 AS idle mode functions and interrelationship
    6. 14.6 Example of idle mode procedures
    7. 14.7 Summary
  24. Appendix
  25. References
  26. Index