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VHF / UHF Filters and Multicouplers: Application of Air Resonators

Book Description

This book describes the various devices used in radio communication and broadcasting to achieve high selectivity filtering and coupling. After providing a background in the basics of microwave theory and more detailed material - including a special chapter on precision and errors in measurement - the reader will find detailed descriptions, manufacturing processes, and, for the most useful instances, a number of worked-through formulas, which will allow engineers and technicians to design circuits or components for filtering or coupling applications. Content is covered in this format across a broad range of fields including coaxial cavities, combline filters, band-pass and pass-reject duplexers, multicouplers, circulators, low-noise amplifiers, helix resonators, and much more.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Dedication
  4. Copyright
  5. Preface
  6. Introduction
  7. Chapter 1: Reminders and General Points
    1. 1.1. Lines
      1. 1.1.1. Bifilar lines
      2. 1.1.2. Coaxial lines
    2. 1.2. Adaptation and stationary waves
    3. 1.3. Smith chart
    4. 1.4. Power in a line
    5. 1.5. Line sections
    6. 1.6. Lines with losses
  8. Chapter 2: Measurements in HF
    1. 2.1. Material
    2. 2.2. The power bench
      1. 2.2.1. The measurements to carry out
      2. 2.2.2. Bench configuration
    3. 2.3. Measurements on the network analyzer
      1. 2.3.1. Measurement principles
      2. 2.3.2. Measurement errors
      3. 2.3.3. The measurement attenuator
  9. Chapter 3: Resonant Cavities
    1. 3.1. Resonance
    2. 3.2. Coaxial cavities
    3. 3.3. Quarter-wave cavities
      1. 3.3.1. Excitation
      2. 3.3.2. Possible shapes
      3. 3.3.3. Lines of force
      4. 3.3.4. Equivalence criterion
      5. 3.3.5. Electric length
      6. 3.3.6. Conditions for optimal Q0
      7. 3.3.7. Refutation of the method
      8. 3.3.8. Calculation of Q0
  10. Chapter 4: Fabrication and Tuning of Cavities
    1. 4.1. Standard structures
      1. 4.1.1. Band-pass
      2. 4.1.2. Reject
      3. 4.1.3. Pass-reject
    2. 4.2. Materials
      1. 4.2.1. The thin metal sheet
      2. 4.2.2. Extrusion
    3. 4.3. Assembly
    4. 4.4. Temperature stability
      1. 4.4.1. Compensation for ambient temperature
      2. 4.4.2. Compensation for internal heating
      3. 4.4.3. Various remarks. Humidity effects
    5. 4.5. Cavity tuning
      1. 4.5.1. Insertion loss and selectivity
      2. 4.5.2. Loop tuning
      3. 4.5.3. Frequency tuning
  11. Chapter 5: The Band-pass Filter
    1. 5.1. The band-pass function
    2. 5.2. Calculation of a Tchebycheff band-pass
    3. 5.3. Technologies
      1. 5.3.1. Planar circuits
      2. 5.3.2. Ceramic filters
      3. 5.3.3. Dielectric air filters
  12. Chapter 6: The Combline Filter
    1. 6.1. Architecture
      1. 6.1.1. General structure
      2. 6.1.2. Fastening the tubes
      3. 6.1.3. Housing, tuning, stability in temperature
    2. 6.2. Dimension calculations. Dishal’s Method
      1. 6.2.1. Parameterization
      2. 6.2.2. The modified method
    3. 6.3. Tuning of filters
      1. 6.3.1. General rules
      2. 6.3.2. Elliptization of the Tchebycheffs
      3. 6.3.3. Mechanical model
      4. 6.3.4. Abundances of the mechanical model
  13. Chapter 7: Channel Multiplexing
    1. 7.1. Definitions
    2. 7.2. The duplexer
      1. 7.2.1. The pass-reject duplexer
      2. 7.2.2. The band-pass duplexer
        1. Remark 1
        2. Remark 2
    3. 7.3. The combiner
      1. 7.3.1. The nodal-point combiner
      2. 7.3.2. The series combiner
      3. 7.3.3. Harness adjustment
      4. 7.3.4. Secondary harness
      5. 7.3.5. Projected losses
      6. 7.3.6. Optimal Q
  14. Chapter 8: Auxiliary Devices
    1. 8.1. Introduction
    2. 8.2. Circulators
      1. 8.2.1. Operating principle
      2. 8.2.2. Usage
      3. 8.2.3. Characterization
    3. 8.3. The antenna alarms
      1. 8.3.1. Detection alarm
      2. 8.3.2. Thermal alarm
        1. Remark
    4. 8.4. Loads and attenuators
      1. 8.4.1. Loads
      2. 8.4.2. Reminders concerning the transmission of heat
      3. 8.4.3. Attenuators
    5. 8.5. Reception amplifiers
      1. 8.5.1. Introduction
        1. 1) Bipolar transistor (8.15a)
        2. 2) Field-effect transistor (8.15b)
      2. 8.5.2. Intercept point
      3. 8.5.3. Noise factor
    6. 8.6. The impedance adaptor
    7. 8.7. The 2nd harmonic rejecter
  15. Chapter 9: Directive Couplers
    1. 9.1. Introduction
    2. 9.2. Technologies
      1. Figure 9.2a: microstrip coupler
      2. Figure 9.2b: layered hybrid coupler
      3. Figure 9.2c: air coupler
      4. Figure 9.2d: coupler for measuring device
    3. 9.3. The hybrid transformer
    4. 9.4. The 180° hybrid ring
    5. 9.5. The wireline
    6. 9.6. The “groundless” coupler
    7. 9.7. The “catnose” coupler
    8. 9.8. Discrete-elements coupler
    9. 9.9. Numerical data
      1. Important remark
    10. 9.10. Applications
  16. Chapter 10: Helical Resonators
    1. 10.1. Introduction
    2. 10.2. Functioning
    3. 10.3. Structures
    4. 10.4. Tapping and coupling
    5. 10.5. Quality coefficient
    6. 10.6. Set-up rules
    7. 10.7. Applications
  17. Chapter 11: Multicouplers
    1. 11.1. Transmitter multicouplers (TX)
      1. 11.1.1. Choice of the technology
      2. 11.1.2. Cascading hybrid TX multicouplers
      3. 11.1.3. TX multicoupler with degressive coupling
      4. 11.1.4. Cavity TX multicouplers
      5. 11.1.5. TX multicoupler with directive filters
    2. 11.2. Receiver multicouplers (RX)
    3. 11.3. TX/RX multicouplers
    4. 11.4. TMA
    5. 11.5. Power and intermodulations
      1. 11.5.1 Limit power
      2. 11.5.2. Intermodulations
    6. 11.6. Multiband coupling
  18. Chapter 12: Utilities
    1. 12.1. BASIC programs
    2. 12.2. Varia
  19. Chapter 13: Various Questions and Exploratory Ways
    1. 13.1. The coupler without intrinsic loss
    2. 13.2. Infinite rejection band-pass
    3. 13.3. Helix TX multicoupler
    4. 13.4. Conclusion
  20. Bibliography
  21. Index