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Validating Product Ideas

Book Description

Want to know what your users are thinking? If you’re a product manager or developer, this book will help you learn the techniques for finding the answers to your most burning questions about your customers. With step-by-step guidance, Validating Product Ideas shows you how to tackle the research to build the best possible product.

Table of Contents

  1. How to Use This Book
  2. Frequently Asked Questions
  3. Foreword
  4. Introduction
  5. Chapter 1: What Do People Need?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When Should You Ask the Question?
    3. Answering the Question with Experience Sampling
    4. Why Experience Sampling Works
    5. Other Questions Experience Sampling Helps Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Define the scope and phrase the experience sampling question.
      2. Step 2: Find research participants.
      3. Step 3: Decide how long it will take participants to answer.
      4. Step 4: Decide how many data points you need.
      5. Step 5: Choose a medium to send and collect data.
      6. Step 6: Plan the analysis.
      7. Step 7: Set participant expectations.
      8. Step 8: Launch a pilot, then the study, and monitor responses.
      9. Step 9: Analyze data.
      10. Step 10: Generate bar charts.
      11. Step 11: Eyeball the data and identify themes.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. Experience Sampling Checklist
  6. Chapter 2: Who Are the Users?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When Should You Ask the Question?
    3. Answering the Question with Interviewing and Personas
    4. Why Interviewing Works
    5. Other Questions Interviewing Helps Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Create BS personas.
      2. Step 2: Decide who, how, and where to interview.
      3. Step 3: Write a one-page plan.
      4. Step 4: Find 10 interviewees.
      5. Step 5: Prepare the interview.
      6. Step 6: Prepare for data collection.
      7. Step 7: Establish rapport.
      8. Step 8: Obtain consent.
      9. Step 9: Conduct the interviews.
      10. Step 10: Analyze collected data.
      11. Step 11: Transform BS personas to personas.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. Interviewing Checklist
  7. Chapter 3: How Do People Currently Solve a Problem?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When Should You Ask the Question?
    3. Answering the Question with Observation
    4. Why Observation Works
    5. Other Questions Observation Helps Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Find eight research participants.
      2. Step 2: Prepare a field guide.
      3. Step 3: Brief observers.
      4. Step 4: Practice!
      5. Step 5: Gather equipment.
      6. Step 6: Establish rapport.
      7. Step 7: Obtain consent.
      8. Step 8: Collect data and pay attention.
      9. Step 9: Debrief.
      10. Step 10: Analyze and synthesize.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. Observation Checklist
  8. Chapter 4: What Is the User’s Workflow?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When Should You Ask the Question?
    3. Answering the Question with a Diary Study
    4. Why a Diary Study Works
    5. Other Questions a Diary Study Helps Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Choose diary type and structure.
      2. Step 2: Set up a data collection tool.
      3. Step 3: Carefully recruit eight research participants.
      4. Step 4: Prepare instructions and brief participants.
      5. Step 5: Launch the pilot and then the full study.
      6. Step 6: Prompt participants for the right data.
      7. Step 7: End with interviews.
      8. Step 8: Reframe diary data.
      9. Step 9: Construct workflow.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. Diary Study Checklist
  9. Chapter 5: Do People Want the Product?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When Should You Ask It?
    3. Answering the Question with a Concierge MVP and Fake Doors Experiment
    4. Why Concierge MVP and Fake Doors Experiments Work
    5. Other Questions Concierge MVP and Fake Doors Experiments Help Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Choose an experiment type.
      2. Step 2: Design a Concierge MVP.
      3. Step 3: Find customers and pitch Concierge MVP.
      4. Step 4: Serve the Concierge MVP to customers.
      5. Step 5: Design a Fake Doors experiment.
      6. Step 6: Determine a Fake Doors threshold.
      7. Step 7: Make a decision and move on.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. Concierge MVP and Fake Doors Experiments Checklist
  10. Chapter 6: Can People Use the Product?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When Should You Ask the Question?
    3. Answering the Question with Online Usability Testing
    4. Why Online Usability Testing Works
    5. Other Questions Online Usability Testing Helps Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Write a one-page plan.
      2. Step 2: Find 5 or 500 participants.
      3. Step 3: Phrase instructions, tasks, and questions.
      4. Step 4: Pilot-test!
      5. Step 5: Prepare a rainbow analysis spreadsheet.
      6. Step 6: Launch the test.
      7. Step 7: Collaboratively analyze results.
      8. Step 8: Make changes.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. Online Usability Testing Checklist
  11. Chapter 7: Which Design Generates Better Results?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When You Should Ask the Question
    3. Answering the Question with A/B Testing
    4. Why A/B Testing Works
    5. Other Questions A/B Testing Helps Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Decide what to compare.
      2. Step 2: Compare pages, tasks, features, or elements with an A/B test.
      3. Step 3: Find research participants.
      4. Step 4: Evaluate if it’s a good time to test.
      5. Step 5: Determine what would be an actionable result.
      6. Step 6: Choose the tool, configure the test, and launch it.
      7. Step 7: Stop the test.
      8. Step 8: Understand the results.
      9. Step 9: Understand “why,” not just “what.”
      10. Step 10: Make a decision.
      11. Step 11: Decide what to test next.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. A/B Testing Checklist
  12. Chapter 8: How Do People Find Stuff?
    1. Why Is This Question Important?
    2. When Should You Ask It?
    3. Answering the Question with Tree Testing, First-Click Testing, and Lostness Metric
    4. Why Tree Testing, First-Click Testing, and Lostness Metric Work
    5. Other Questions Tree Testing, First-Click Testing, and Lostness Metric Help Answer
    6. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Write a one-page plan.
      2. Step 2: Find 500 research participants.
      3. Step 3: State product navigation assumptions.
      4. Step 4: Phrase instructions, tasks, and questions.
      5. Step 5: Launch a tree testing study.
      6. Step 6: Analyze results and make a decision.
      7. Step 7: Launch a first-click test.
      8. Step 8: Analyze first-click results.
      9. Step 9: Track lostness.
      10. Step 10: Make changes and re-evaluate.
    7. Other Methods to Answer the Question
    8. Tree Testing, First-Click Testing, and Lostness Metric Checklist
  13. Chapter 9: How to Find Participants for Research?
    1. Where to Find Participants for Research
    2. How to Answer the Question
      1. Step 1: Identify participant criteria.
      2. Step 2: Transform criteria into screening questions.
      3. Step 3: Create a screening questionnaire.
      4. Step 4: Identify keywords for your audience.
      5. Step 5: Find target groups and pages on Facebook.
      6. Step 6: Find target hashtags on Twitter.
      7. Step 7: Find target communities and pages on Google Plus.
      8. Step 8: Post screener to Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus.
      9. Step 9: Track responses and select participants.
    3. Checklist for Finding Research Participants on Social Media
    4. Shake, Rattle, and Roll
  14. Index
  15. Acknowledgments
  16. About the Author
  17. Footnotes