You are previewing Using WebSphere Message Broker V8 in Mid-Market Environments.
O'Reilly logo
Using WebSphere Message Broker V8 in Mid-Market Environments

Book Description

IBM WebSphere® Message Broker is a lightweight, advanced enterprise service bus (ESB) that provides a broad range of integration capabilities that enable companies to rapidly integrate internal applications and connect to partner applications. Messages from business applications can be transformed, augmented and routed to other business applications. The types and complexity of the integration required will vary by company, application types, and a number of other factors.

Processing logic in WebSphere Message Broker is implemented using message flows. Through message flows, messages from business applications can be transformed, augmented, and routed to other business applications. Message flows are created by connecting nodes together. A wide selection of built-in nodes are provided with WebSphere Message Broker. These nodes perform tasks that are associated with message routing, transformation, and enrichment. Message flows are created and tested using the Message Broker Toolkit, a sophisticated, easy-to-use programming tool that provides a full range of programming aids.

This IBM® Redbooks® publication focuses on two specific integration requirements that apply to many midmarket companies. The first is the ability to use WebSphere Message Broker to integrate Microsoft.NET applications into a broader connectivity solution. WebSphere Message Broker V8 introduces the ability to integrate with existing Microsoft .NET Framework applications. A .NET assembly can be called from within a message flow and the WebSphere Message Broker runtime can host and run .NET code. Solutions explored in this book cover connectivity to applications using Windows Communications Framework (WCF), Microsoft Message Queuing, Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and other Microsoft applications.

The second is the ability to integrate WebSphere Message Broker with file transfer networks, specifically with WebSphere MQ File Transfer Edition and IBM Sterling Connect Direct.

Please note that the additional material referenced in the text is not available from IBM.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Contact an IBM Software Services Sales Specialist
  3. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  4. Preface
    1. The team who wrote this book
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  5. Chapter 1. WebSphere Message Broker for mid-market solutions
    1. 1.1 WebSphere Message Broker
      1. 1.1.1 Message processing
      2. 1.1.2 Connectivity options
      3. 1.1.3 WebSphere Message Broker editions
    2. 1.2 WebSphere Message Broker for midmarket
      1. 1.2.1 Microsoft .Net integration
      2. 1.2.2 File processing and transfer
    3. 1.3 Additional resources
  6. Chapter 2. Introduction to WebSphere Message Broker V8
    1. 2.1 Runtime architecture of WebSphere Message Broker
      1. 2.1.1 Broker
      2. 2.1.2 Execution groups
    2. 2.2 Development environment of WebSphere Message Broker
      1. 2.2.1 WebSphere Message Broker Toolkit
      2. 2.2.2 Applications and libraries
      3. 2.2.3 Message flows
      4. 2.2.4 Message
      5. 2.2.5 Message modeling
      6. 2.2.6 Pattern instances
      7. 2.2.7 Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 integration
    3. 2.3 Connectivity options
      1. 2.3.1 WebSphere MQ
      2. 2.3.2 Java Message Service (JMS) 1.1
      3. 2.3.3 WebSphere MQ/JMS
      4. 2.3.4 SOAP-based web services
      5. 2.3.5 HTTP and HTTPS
      6. 2.3.6 File
      7. 2.3.7 Java Connector Architecture (JCA) Adapters and WebSphere adapters
      8. 2.3.8 TCP/IP
      9. 2.3.9 Service Component Architecture
    4. 2.4 Transformation interfaces
      1. 2.4.1 Compute node
      2. 2.4.2 JavaCompute node
      3. 2.4.3 PHPCompute node
      4. 2.4.4 .NETCompute node
    5. 2.5 Administering WebSphere Message Broker
      1. 2.5.1 WebSphere Message Broker Explorer
      2. 2.5.2 Broker sets
      3. 2.5.3 Web Administration and record and replay
    6. 2.6 Deploying applications
    7. 2.7 Getting started
      1. 2.7.1 Opening the Message Broker Toolkit
      2. 2.7.2 Creating a new application
      3. 2.7.3 Creating a new message flow
      4. 2.7.4 Creating a broker
      5. 2.7.5 Managing brokers
      6. 2.7.6 Creating a BAR file for deployment
      7. 2.7.7 Deploying the BAR file to a broker
      8. 2.7.8 Executing WebSphere Message Broker commands
    8. 2.8 Creating WebSphere MQ queue managers and queues
      1. 2.8.1 Creating queue managers
      2. 2.8.2 Creating queues and queue managers using commands
      3. 2.8.3 Creating queue managers and queues from the WebSphere MQ Explorer
  7. Chapter 3. Using the tools for WebSphere Message Broker and .NET Integration
    1. 3.1 Creating a .NETCompute node in a message flow
      1. 3.1.1 Creating the messaging flow
      2. 3.1.2 Creating the code for the .NETCompute node
      3. 3.1.3 Setting the properties for the .NETCompute node
      4. 3.1.4 Deploying the application
    2. 3.2 Hot swap deploys
    3. 3.3 Using the Visual Studio debugger
  8. Chapter 4. Scenario: Bridging WebSphere MQ and Microsoft Message Queuing
    1. 4.1 Scenario overview
    2. 4.2 Receiving messages from MSMQ
      1. 4.2.1 Constructing a simple utility to read and write MSMQ messages
      2. 4.2.2 Constructing and testing a basic message flow
    3. 4.3 Mapping headers between MSMQ and WebSphere MQ
    4. 4.4 Adding logging to your code
    5. 4.5 Handling exceptions
    6. 4.6 Sending messages to MSMQ
      1. 4.6.1 Constructing the message flow
      2. 4.6.2 Configuring the message flow
      3. 4.6.3 Creating the .NET code
      4. 4.6.4 Writing the code
    7. 4.7 Distributed transactional coordination
      1. 4.7.1 Manual transaction sample
      2. 4.7.2 Testing the message flow
    8. 4.8 Conversions
  9. Chapter 5. Scenario: Calling Microsoft Dynamics CRM from a message flow
    1. 5.1 Scenario overview
      1. 5.1.1 SAP Request node for SAP Software
      2. 5.1.2 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online
      3. 5.1.3 Prerequisites for this scenario
    2. 5.2 Creating the message flow
      1. 5.2.1 Setting up the environment
      2. 5.2.2 Creating and connecting the nodes
      3. 5.2.3 Configuring the node properties
      4. 5.2.4 Broker configuration for SAP request nodes
      5. 5.2.5 Writing the code for the SAP nodes
      6. 5.2.6 Coding the ESQL for the Compute nodes
      7. 5.2.7 Coding the Filter Request .NETCompute node
      8. 5.2.8 Writing the code for the database operations
      9. 5.2.9 Writing the code for accessing Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online
      10. 5.2.10 Writing the code for the .NETCompute node (Create) - DB<->CreateCRMOnlineCustomer
    3. 5.3 Deploying the message flow
    4. 5.4 Testing the message flow
      1. 5.4.1 Windows Forms Project: GUI Based
      2. 5.4.2 Writing the code for the SubscribeToService form
      3. 5.4.3 Running the test
      4. 5.4.4 Using the test client from the Message Broker Toolkit
    5. 5.5 Troubleshooting tips
  10. Chapter 6. Scenario: Integration Windows Communication Foundation in message flows - Part 1
    1. 6.1 ClaimsProcessingWcfService overview
    2. 6.2 Windows Communication Foundation
      1. 6.2.1 WCF ABCs
      2. 6.2.2 WCF operation
    3. 6.3 Developing the WCF Service
      1. 6.3.1 Creating a Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 project for the WCF Service
      2. 6.3.2 Setting the namespace for the project
      3. 6.3.3 Modifying the classes created by the New Project Wizard
      4. 6.3.4 Creating the required datatypes
      5. 6.3.5 Creating private methods to serialize and deserialize the Datatypes
      6. 6.3.6 Designing and implementing the service contract
      7. 6.3.7 Building the WCF Service
      8. 6.3.8 Configuring the WCF service
      9. 6.3.9 Testing the WCF Service using the WCF Test Client
    4. 6.4 Obtaining information about the service using MEX
    5. 6.5 Generating WCF client code from a MEX enabled WCF service
    6. 6.6 WCF hosting options
      1. 6.6.1 Hosting using Visual Studio
      2. 6.6.2 Hosting using a stand-alone application
      3. 6.6.3 Hosting as a service
      4. 6.6.4 Hosting in Internet Information Services (IIS)
  11. Chapter 7. Scenario: Integrating Windows Communication Foundation in message flows - Part 2
    1. 7.1 Scenario overview
      1. 7.1.1 Prerequisites
    2. 7.2 Creating the message flow
      1. 7.2.1 Preparing message models
      2. 7.2.2 Creating the message flow
      3. 7.2.3 Creating and connecting the nodes
      4. 7.2.4 Configuring node properties
      5. 7.2.5 Queue names
    3. 7.3 Using the Mapping node to transform the input to the Canonical Message Format
    4. 7.4 Transforming the SOAP input message
    5. 7.5 Creating a .NETCompute node to consume the ClaimsProcessingWcfService
      1. 7.5.1 Creating a constant to hold the namespace prefix
      2. 7.5.2 Adding the MEX-generated WCF client to the project
      3. 7.5.3 Developing helper methods to interact with the WCF service
      4. 7.5.4 Concurrency
      5. 7.5.5 Handling exceptions when invoking the WCF service
      6. 7.5.6 Ensuring that the serviceClient is closed on flow deletion
      7. 7.5.7 Creating methods to add datatypes to the message tree
      8. 7.5.8 Creating a helper method to build Customer object from the Logical Message Tree
      9. 7.5.9 Preparing the ClaimsProcessingRequest object
      10. 7.5.10 Adding the information from the WCF response into the message tree
      11. 7.5.11 The CallWCFNode.Evaluate() method
      12. 7.5.12 Handling failed tree navigations in the Evaluate() method
      13. 7.5.13 Handling FaultExceptions in the Evaluate() method
      14. 7.5.14 Verifying the completed CallWCFNode
    6. 7.6 Routing the output
      1. 7.6.1 Additional processing
      2. 7.6.2 Routing the reply message
    7. 7.7 Writing a .NETCompute node class to generate a payment message
    8. 7.8 Processing incomplete results for the ViewOutstandingClaims operation
    9. 7.9 Creating a Word document for email and print
      1. 7.9.1 Preparing a letter template
      2. 7.9.2 Creating a user-defined property for the template location
      3. 7.9.3 Creating .NET code to generate a Word document using a template
      4. 7.9.4 Using the EmailOutput node to send an email to the customer
      5. 7.9.5 Using the FileOutput node to send the file for printing
    10. 7.10 Using the Mapping node to transform the Canonical message to the output format
    11. 7.11 Using a Compute node to transform the Canonical Message into a SOAP message
    12. 7.12 Handling exceptions in the flow
    13. 7.13 Building and deploying the Visual Studio project
      1. 7.13.1 Building a solution
    14. 7.14 Updating the properties for the .NETCompute nodes
    15. 7.15 Building and deploying the Message Broker application
      1. 7.15.1 Creating the BAR file
      2. 7.15.2 Deploying the BAR file
    16. 7.16 Testing the WebSphere Message Broker application
      1. 7.16.1 Testing the MQ interface
      2. 7.16.2 Testing the SOAP Interface
    17. 7.17 Altering the scenario to use a SOAP over HTTP based binding
      1. 7.17.1 Altering the WCF Service to expose an http based binding
      2. 7.17.2 Altering a message flow to use an HTTP based binding
  12. Chapter 8. Integrating file transfer with WebSphere MQ FTE into the message flow
    1. 8.1 Scenario overview
    2. 8.2 Overview of the WebSphere MQ File Transfer edition
      1. 8.2.1 Using WebSphere Message Broker as a bridge for FTE networks
    3. 8.3 Preparing the broker environment for this scenario
      1. 8.3.1 Creating the database
      2. 8.3.2 Configuring the ODBC data source
      3. 8.3.3 Preparing the file system structure
    4. 8.4 Applications emulated in this scenario
      1. 8.4.1 Branch application (FTE)
      2. 8.4.2 Report Data Warehouse
      3. 8.4.3 Volume Analysis System
    5. 8.5 Creating the main message flow
      1. 8.5.1 Message flow overview
      2. 8.5.2 Creating and connecting the nodes
      3. 8.5.3 Creating a message definition
      4. 8.5.4 Using FTE nodes
      5. 8.5.5 Using aggregation in WebSphere Message Broker
      6. 8.5.6 Producing multiple messages from the compute node
      7. 8.5.7 Accessing databases from the database nodes
      8. 8.5.8 Creating the queues for the FTESample application
    6. 8.6 Running the scenario
      1. 8.6.1 Troubleshooting tips
      2. 8.6.2 Exploring the work of the scenario
    7. 8.7 Extending the scenario
  13. Chapter 9. Integrating file transfer using Sterling Connect:Direct with your message flow
    1. 9.1 Scenario overview
    2. 9.2 Overview of the Sterling Connect:Direct
    3. 9.3 Using WebSphere Message broker with Connect:Direct
    4. 9.4 Preparing the Connect:Direct environment
    5. 9.5 Preparing the logging database
    6. 9.6 Configuring WebSphere Message Broker
      1. 9.6.1 Creating a configurable service on WebSphere Message Broker
      2. 9.6.2 Creating the message flow
      3. 9.6.3 Creating the main message flow
      4. 9.6.4 Creating the simulation flow
      5. 9.6.5 Deploying the message flows and preparing the environment
      6. 9.6.6 Sample file transfer data
      7. 9.6.7 Testing the message flow
  14. Appendix A. Additional material
    1. Locating the Web material
    2. Using the Web material
  15. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Online resources
    3. Help from IBM
  16. Back cover