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Using Microsoft® Project 2010 by Brian Kennemer, Sonia Atchison

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7. Capturing Project Progress

This chapter discusses how you can use Project 2010 to capture what’s going on in your project and how to compare it to what you had planned.

As resources on your project begin work on tasks, they will have actual work hours and status to report. If your organization uses Project Professional 2010 with Project Server, some of this reporting is streamlined. However, you can choose to collect progress through more traditional means, such as weekly status reports and team meetings. If you go this route, you’ll need to manually enter progress into Project 2010.

Baselining Your Project

After your project is initially set up, it can be helpful to set a project baseline. A baseline is a snapshot of your project data, including ...

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