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UNIX Hints & Hacks

Book Description

UNIX Hints & Hacks is designed to instantly reward you through increased productivity and satisfaction with UNIX. Each and every hint and/or hack provides real value--not just a list of obvious procedures marked as secrets. Learn UNIX administration skills you can apply daily with UNIX workstations and servers. Discover networking tricks to make modifications safely over the network. Tackle security issues such as dealing with SuperUser accounts, permissions, and vulnerabilities in the UNIX operating system. Develop various ways to monitor the system logs and load averages, to aid in the tuning, fixing, and security. Also learn to add, manipulate, and modify user accounts in new ways, and improve your file management skills for modifying, viewing, and executin. With UNIX Hints & Hacks you'll look up from the reading and say, "I can't wait to try that!"

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
    1. Dedication
  2. About the Author
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. Tell Us What You Think!
  5. Introduction
    1. UNIX Knowledge Needed
    2. Tested UNIX Flavors
    3. Shells and Scripting Languages
    4. Before Beginning
    5. Hints & Hacks Topics
    6. Examples: Commands, Functions, Routines, and Procedures
    7. Symbols, Command Syntax, and Notations
    8. Structure
  6. 1. Topics in Administration
    1. 1.1. Collecting System Information
      1. 1.1.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    2. 1.2. Backup Key Files!
      1. 1.2.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
    3. 1.3. Execution on the Last Day of a Month
      1. 1.3.1. Description
        1. Example One: The Shell Method
        2. Example Two: The Perl Method
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    4. 1.4. Dealing with Unwanted Daemons
      1. 1.4.1. Description
        1. Example One: Disabling Daemons from inetd.conf
        2. Example Two: Disabling from rc
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    5. 1.5. Keep Those Daemons Running
      1. 1.5.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experiences
        4. Other Resources
    6. 1.6. fuser Instead of ps
      1. 1.6.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    7. 1.7. Swap on-the-Fly
      1. 1.7.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    8. 1.8. Keep It Up with nohup
      1. 1.8.1. Description
        1. Example One: Basic nohup Command Use
        2. Example Two: Low priority nohup
        3. Example Three: Multiple Command, Multiple System nohup
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    9. 1.9. Redirecting Output to Null
      1. 1.9.1. Description
        1. Example One: Basic Command Redirection to null
        2. Example Two: Basic Program Redirection to null
        3. Example Three: Zero a File with null
        4. Example Four: Copy null into a File
        5. Example Five: Linking to null
        6. Example Six: Redirecting Mail to null
        7. Example Seven: Schedule cron to Redirect Output to null.
        8. Reason
        9. Real World Experience
        10. Other Resources
    10. 1.10. Keeping Remote Users Out
      1. 1.10.1. Description
        1. Example One: Single User Method
        2. Example Two: New /etc/passwd File
        3. Example Three: Modify /etc/inetd.conf
        4. Example Four: Disabling the Network
        5. Example Five: Blocking Telnet and Remote Shell Accesses
        6. Example Six: Blocking Remote FTP Access
        7. Reason
        8. Real World Experience
        9. Other Resources
    11. 1.11. Rewinding Tapes Fast
      1. 1.11.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real Word Experience
        4. Other Resources
    12. 1.12. Generating a Range of Numbers
      1. 1.12.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
    13. 1.13. Remove the ---- Dashes ----
      1. 1.13.1. Description
        1. Example One: Using File Manager
        2. Example Two: Hiding in the Directory
        3. Example Three: Fighting a Dash with a Dash
        4. Example Four: Brute Force—rm -r
        5. Reason
        6. Real World Experience
        7. Other Resources
    14. 1.14. echo Does ls
      1. 1.14.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reasons
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    15. 1.15. Building Large Dummy Files
      1. 1.15.1. Description
        1. Example One: dd
        2. Example Two: Scripting dd
        3. Example Three: The Perl Way
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    16. 1.16. Burning-in Disk Drives
      1. 1.16.1. Description
        1. Example One: Deal the File Out
        2. Example Two: Round-Robin
        3. Example Three: Fill the Disk
        4. Reason
        5. Real Word Experiences
    17. 1.17. Bringing a System Down
      1. 1.17.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
  7. 2. Networking
    1. 2.1. OSI Networking Model
      1. 2.1.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    2. 2.2. Finding the Failure
      1. 2.2.1. Description
        1. Examples
          1. Who Is Affected?
            1. Check the Network Interface
            2. Accessing the Network
            3. Check the Network Cables
            4. Check the Concentrator
            5. Check the Router
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    3. 2.3. Hiding Files with NFS
      1. 2.3.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    4. 2.4. Remote Network Configurations
      1. 2.4.1. Description
        1. Example One: Using the ifconfig Command
        2. Example Two: Changing the Gateway
        3. Example Three: Changes to NIS/YP
        4. Example Four: Kill Network Daemons
        5. Reason
        6. Real World Experience
        7. Other Resources
    5. 2.5. Shutdown, Halt, or Reboot over the Network
      1. 2.5.1. Description
        1. Example One: When to use shutdown and halt
        2. Example Two: When to Use reboot
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    6. 2.6. Talking NFS3 to NFS2
      1. 2.6.1. Description
        1. Example: Apply a type NFS2 to the Mount Point Being Made
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    7. 2.7. Unmounting and Busy Devices
      1. 2.7.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reasons
        3. Real World Experiences
        4. Other Resources
    8. 2.8. Static Routing or routed
      1. 2.8.1. Description
        1. Example One: Default Routing
        2. Example Two: Running routed
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    9. 2.9. Get the Ethernet Address with arp
      1. 2.9.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
  8. 3. Security
    1. 3.1. Delegating root to Multiple Admins
      1. 3.1.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    2. 3.2. The Full Path to Superuser
      1. 3.2.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    3. 3.3. Monitoring root in the Password File
      1. 3.3.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
    4. 3.4. Vulnerabilities in UNIX
      1. 3.4.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experiences
        3. Other Resources
    5. 3.5. Permissions Levels
      1. 3.5.1. Description
        1. Example One: Go but Don't Look
        2. Example Two: Look but Don't Write, but You Can Write
        3. Example Three: Deny Group Access
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    6. 3.6. Protect root at All Costs
      1. 3.6.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    7. 3.7. File Collecting
      1. 3.7.1. Description
        1. Example One: Using Simple Find
        2. Example Two: Extended Find with xargs
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    8. 3.8. File Encryption
      1. 3.8.1. Description
        1. Example One: Simple Encryption
        2. Example Two: Compression with Encryption
        3. Example Three: Compression with Missing Headers
        4. Example Five: Multiple Encryptions
        5. Example Five: Hiding Within tar
        6. Reason
        7. Real World Experience
        8. Other Resources
    9. 3.9. Clear and Lock
      1. 3.9.1. Description
        1. Example One: Clear the Screen
        2. Example Two: Lock the Screen
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    10. 3.10. Power Tools
      1. 3.10.1. Description
        1. Other Resources
  9. 4. System Monitoring
    1. 4.1. Monitoring at Boot Time
      1. 4.1.1. Description
        1. Example One: The rc Files
        2. Example Two: The rc "S" Scripts
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    2. 4.2. Starting with a Fresh Install
      1. 4.2.1. Description
        1. Real World Experience
        2. Example One
        3. Other Resources
    3. 4.3. Monitor with tail
      1. 4.3.1. Description
        1. Example One
        2. Example Two: The Last Lines
        3. Example Three: tail with Users
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    4. 4.4. Cut the Log in Half
      1. 4.4.1. Description
        1. Example One: Trimming It with tail
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    5. 4.5. Mail a Process
      1. 4.5.1. Description
        1. Example One: Piping mail
        2. Example Two: Redirecting mail
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    6. 4.6. Watching the Disk Space
      1. 4.6.1. Description
        1. Example One: Get the Percentage of Space
        2. Example Two: Get the Amount of Free Space
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    7. 4.7. Find the Disk Hog
      1. 4.7.1. Description
        1. Example One: Do It with du
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    8. 4.8. Watching by grepping the Difference
      1. 4.8.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    9. 4.9. Monitoring with ping
      1. 4.9.1. Description
        1. Example One: ping a Remote Host
        2. Example Two: Monitoring a Host with ping
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    10. 4.10. Monitoring Core Files
      1. 4.10.1. Description
        1. Example One: Locating the Core Files
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
    11. 4.11. Monitoring Crash Files
      1. 4.11.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
    12. 4.12. Remember Daylight Savings Time
      1. 4.12.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    13. 4.13. Checking the Time
      1. 4.13.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
  10. 5. Account Management
    1. 5.1. User Account Names
      1. 5.1.1. Description
        1. Example One: Cryptic Standard
        2. Example Two: Abbreviated Usernames
        3. Example Three: Application Names
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
    2. 5.2. Passwords
      1. 5.2.1. Description
        1. Example One: Password File with Encrypted Field
        2. Example Two: Shadow Passwords
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experiences
        5. Other Resources
    3. 5.3. UID
      1. 5.3.1. Description
        1. Example One: Large Installations
        2. Example Two: Migrating to Existing Systems
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experiences
        5. Other Resources
    4. 5.4. Group IDs and /etc/group
      1. 5.4.1. Description
        1. Example One: /etc/groups
        2. Example Two: Changing User GIDs
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experiences
        5. Other Resources
    5. 5.5. GECOS Field
      1. 5.5.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
    6. 5.6. Home Directories
      1. 5.6.1. Description
        1. Example One: Living Locally
        2. Example Two: Living Remotely
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Examples
    7. 5.7. Shells and the Password File
      1. 5.7.1. Description
        1. Example One: Interpreting a Shell
        2. Example Two: Interpreting a Program
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    8. 5.8. Configuring an Account
      1. 5.8.1. Description
        1. Example One: The Graphical User Interfaces
        2. Example Two: Programs and Scripts
        3. Example Three: From a Command Prompt
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    9. 5.9. User Account Startup Files
      1. 5.9.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    10. 5.10. Using Aliases
      1. 5.10.1. Description
        1. Examples
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
    11. 5.11. MS-DOS Users
      1. 5.11.1. Description
        1. Reasons
        2. Real World Experience
    12. 5.12. Changing Shells
      1. 5.12.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
    13. 5.13. Finding My Display
      1. 5.13.1. Description
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
    14. 5.14. Copy Files to Multiple Home Directories
      1. 5.14.1. Description
        1. Example One: Stripping the Password File
        2. Reasons
        3. Real World Experience
    15. 5.15. Kill an Account
      1. 5.15.1. Description
        1. Example One: Killing Yourself Quickly
        2. Example Two: Killing X
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
    16. 5.16. Nulling the Root Password Without vi
      1. 5.16.1. Description:
        1. Example
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experience
        4. Other Resources
  11. 6. File Management
    1. 6.1. Copy Files with Permissions and Time Stamps
      1. 6.1.1. Description
        1. Example One: Copy with Permissions
        2. Example Two: Copy with tar
        3. Example Three: Copy with cpio
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    2. 6.2. Copy Files Remotely
      1. 6.2.1. Description
        1. Example One: Remote Copy With the rcp Command
        2. Example Two: Using tar Across the Network
        3. Example Three: Remote Copy over NFS
        4. Example Four: Using FTP to Copy Files
        5. Reasons
        6. Real World Experiences
        7. Other Resources
    3. 6.3. Which tmp Is a Good Temp?
      1. 6.3.1. Description
        1. Example One: Files in /tmp
        2. Example Two: Files in /usr/tmp -> /var/tmp
        3. Example Three: Extra Filesystems with tmp
        4. Example Four: User's Temporary Directory
        5. Reason
        6. Real World Experience
    4. 6.4. Dealing with Symbolic Links
      1. 6.4.1. Description
        1. Example One: Linking System Files and Directories
        2. Example Two: Creating Links to Links to Links
        3. Example Three: Searching for Dead Links
        4. Example Four: Cleaning Up Links to Links to Links
        5. Reason
        6. Real World Experience
        7. Other Resources
    5. 6.5. Finding Files with grep
      1. 6.5.1. Description
        1. Example One: Using find with grep
        2. Example Two: Using grep on a find List File
        3. Reason
        4. Other Resources
    6. 6.6. Multiple grep
      1. 6.6.1. Description
        1. Example One: Using grep Again and Again
        2. Example Two: Searching with egrep
        3. Reason
        4. Other Resources
    7. 6.7. Executing Commands Recursively with find
      1. 6.7.1. Description
        1. Example One: Searching Recursively
        2. Example Two: Removal of Old Files
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    8. 6.8. Moving and Renaming Groups of Files
      1. 6.8.1. Description
        1. Example One: The mv Command
        2. Example Two: Renaming Files with mv
        3. Example Three: Renaming Uppercase Filenames to Lowercase
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    9. 6.9. Stripping the Man Pages
      1. 6.9.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    10. 6.10. Clean Up DOS Files
      1. 6.10.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    11. 6.11. Splitting Files
      1. 6.11.1. Description
        1. Example One: Splitting Files for Floppies
        2. Example Two: Splitting Log Files
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    12. 6.12. Limit the Size of the Core
      1. 6.12.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    13. 6.13. uuencode and uudecode
      1. 6.13.1. Description
        1. Example One: Encoding a Binary File
        2. Example Two: Decoding a Binary File
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
  12. 7. Displays and Emulations
    1. 7.1. Terminal Types
      1. 7.1.1. Description
        1. Example One: Working With /etc/termcap
        2. Example Two: Add a File to terminfo
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    2. 7.2. Setting Terminal Types
      1. 7.2.1. Description
        1. Example One: Setting TERM in csh
        2. Example Two: Setting TERM in sh or ksh
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    3. 7.3. Make Use of stty
      1. 7.3.1. Description
        1. Example One: Dealing with ^? or ^H
        2. Example Two: Interrupt with Ctrl+C
        3. Example Three: Turning off echo
        4. Example Four: Setting Columns and Rows
        5. Reason
        6. Real World Experiences
        7. Other Resources
    4. 7.4. Hotkeys
      1. 7.4.1. Description
        1. Reasons
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    5. 7.5. Testing ASCII Terminals
      1. 7.5.1. Description
        1. Example One: Checking for a Noisy Line
        2. Example Two: Testing by Monitoring
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resources
    6. 7.6. Troubleshooting ASCII Terminals
      1. 7.6.1. Description
        1. Example One: Check All Cables
        2. Example Two: Dealing With Locked Terminals
        3. Example Three: Resetting the getty Daemon
        4. Example Four: The Dangers of a Power Cycle
        5. Reason
        6. Real World Experience
    7. 7.7. Sharing STDIN/STDOUT on Two Terminals
      1. 7.7.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experiences
        3. Other Resources
    8. 7.8. Refreshing X
      1. 7.8.1. Description
        1. Example: Refresh X
        2. Reason
        3. Real World Experiences
        4. Other Resources
    9. 7.9. Killing Resources with xkill
      1. 7.9.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experiences
        3. Other Resources
    10. 7.10. Setting xterm Titlebars
      1. 7.10.1. Flavors: AT&T, BSD
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experiences
    11. 7.11. Control the Mouse with the Keyboard
      1. 7.11.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experiences
        3. Other Resources
    12. 7.12. Display from a Remote X Server
      1. 7.12.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experiences
        3. Other Resources
    13. 7.13. ASCII Table in UNIX
      1. 7.13.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experiences
        3. Other Resources
  13. 8. Editors
    1. 8.1. The Anatomy of ed & vi
      1. 8.1.1. Description
        1. ed
        2. vi
    2. 8.2. The Six Steps to ed
      1. 8.2.1. Description
        1. Step One: Command Mode
        2. Step Two: Moving the Cursor
        3. Step Three: Switching to Insert Mode
        4. Step Four: Quitting the vi Editor
        5. Step Five: Deleting Characters, Words, and Lines
        6. Step Six: Write to a File and Quit
        7. Reason
        8. Real World Experience
        9. Other Resources
    3. 8.3. Six Simple Steps to vi
      1. 8.3.1. Description
        1. Step One: Command Mode
        2. Step Two: Moving the Cursor
        3. Step Three: Switching to Insert Mode
        4. Step Four: Deleting Characters, Words, and Lines
        5. Step Five: Write to a File and Exit
        6. Step Six: Quitting the vi Editor
        7. Reason
        8. Real World Experience
        9. Other Resources
    4. 8.4. Configuring vi Parameters
      1. 8.4.1. Description
        1. Example One: Setting Parameters Within vi
        2. Example Two: EXINIT Variable
        3. Example Three: .exrc File
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    5. 8.5. Abbreviating vi Commands
      1. 8.5.1. Description
        1. Example One: How to Abbreviate
        2. Example Two: Programming and Scripts
        3. Example Three: System Administration
        4. Example Four: Building HTML Files
        5. Example Five: Executing UNIX Commands
        6. Example Six: Fixing Typographical Errors
        7. Example Seven: Long Words and Phrases
        8. Reason
        9. Real World Experience
        10. Other Resources
    6. 8.6. Creating Macros
      1. 8.6.1. Description
        1. Example One: Setting Up Macros
        2. Example Two: Using F1-F12 Function Keys
        3. Example Three: Displaying Multiple Lines
        4. Example Four: Macros That Move Between Modes
        5. Example Five: HTML Macros
        6. Other Resources
    7. 8.7. Search and Replace
      1. 8.7.1. Description
        1. Example One: Basic Search-and-Replace
        2. Example Two: Interactive
        3. Example Two: Removing Blank Lines
        4. Reason
        5. Real World Experience
        6. Other Resources
    8. 8.8. Other Places to Use vi
      1. 8.8.1. Description
        1. Example One: UNIX Mail
        2. Example Two: Man Pages
        3. Example Three: More
        4. Example Four: Commands in Korn
        5. Reason
        6. Real World Experience
    9. 8.9. Editing Multiple Files
      1. 8.9.1. Description
        1. Example One: ls to vi
        2. Example Two: Find Files for vi
        3. Reason
        4. Real World Experience
        5. Other Resource
    10. 8.10. Edit, Run, and Edit Again
      1. 8.10.1. Description
        1. Reason
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
    11. 8.11. Reading STDOUT into vi
      1. 8.11.1. Description
        1. Example One: Reading the Execution
        2. Example Two: Cut-and-Paste
        3. Example Two: Write/Read A File
    12. 8.12. Using vi when tmp Is Full
      1. 8.12.1. Description
        1. Reasons
        2. Real World Experience
        3. Other Resources
  14. 9. Users
    1. 9.1. Six Types of Users
      1. 9.1.1. The Apologetic User
      2. 9.1.2. The Not Acceptable User
      3. 9.1.3. The Nothing Works User
      4. 9.1.4. The Beta User
      5. 9.1.5. The UNIX System Administrator User
      6. 9.1.6. The Perfect User
    2. 9.2. New Users
      1. 9.2.1. Set Up the Accounts
      2. 9.2.2. Meeting Them
      3. 9.2.3. The UNIX Account and System
      4. 9.2.4. Corporate Policy
      5. 9.2.5. The Computing Environment
    3. 9.3. Public Relations
      1. 9.3.1. Being Visible
      2. 9.3.2. Follow Up
      3. 9.3.3. Maintain Contact
    4. 9.4. Leave Big Impressions with Little Things
      1. 9.4.1. Listen
      2. 9.4.2. Make Little Changes for Users
      3. 9.4.3. Let Them Get Away with Little Things
      4. 9.4.4. Make the Call to the Vendor
    5. 9.5. Handling an Irate User
      1. 9.5.1. Calming Down a User
      2. 9.5.2. Taking the Ball
      3. 9.5.3. Not Dropping the Ball
    6. 9.6. Helping Users with Online Tools
    7. 9.7. Users Borrowing Equipment
      1. 9.7.1. Rules of Lending
      2. 9.7.2. Getting the Equipment Back
      3. 9.7.3. When the Equipment Doesn't Come Back
    8. 9.8. Outage Notifications
      1. 9.8.1. How Much Time Is Needed?
      2. 9.8.2. How Much Notice
      3. 9.8.3. Writing Effective Outage Notices
      4. 9.8.4. How to Notify Users
    9. 9.9. Users Who Take Care of You
    10. 9.10. When Users Leave
      1. 9.10.1. Network with Them!
      2. 9.10.2. Personal Touch
      3. 9.10.3. Account Disabling
  15. 10. System Administration: The Occupation
    1. 10.1. Three Levels of Administration
      1. 10.1.1. Junior Level
      2. 10.1.2. Intermediate/Advanced Level
      3. 10.1.3. Senior Level
      4. 10.1.4. Reaching Guru Status
    2. 10.2. Functions of an Administrator
    3. 10.3. Finding a Job Working with UNIX
      1. 10.3.1. Your First Administrative Job
      2. 10.3.2. Available Resources
    4. 10.4. Preparing an Administrator's Résumé
      1. 10.4.1. For a Small Company
      2. 10.4.2. For a Large Corporation
      3. 10.4.3. Creating a Good UNIX Résumé
        1. Creating Multiple Résumés
    5. 10.5. Preparing for an Interview
    6. 10.6. Types of Interviews
    7. 10.7. Being Interviewed
    8. 10.8. Finding the Right Person for the Job
    9. 10.9. Interviewing Candidates
      1. 10.9.1. Interviews over the Telephone
      2. 10.9.2. Interviewing in Person
    10. 10.10. Working with Vendors: Sales and Maintenance Representatives
      1. 10.10.1. Sales Tactics
      2. 10.10.2. Working with New Sales Representatives
      3. 10.10.3. Requesting Quotations
      4. 10.10.4. Obtaining Maintenance Support
      5. 10.10.5. Getting Something for Nothing
    11. 10.11. Working with Vendor Support
    12. 10.12. Working with Local Support Engineers
  16. A. Basic Scripting Concepts
    1. Building a Script
    2. Recursive Scripts
  17. B. System Installation Checklist
    1. System Installation Check List
  18. C. System Incident Log
    1. System Incident Log
    2. System Incident Log
  19. D. Administration Tools and Recommended Organizations
    1. System Administration Tools
    2. Networking Tools
      1. Security Tools
    3. Recommended Organizations
  20. E. Glossary