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Universal Ontology of Geographic Space

Book Description

A universal approach to the ontology of geographic space has already been, and is going to be, a comprehensive task for establishing more effective spatial models. The concept of a universal spatial ontology should be independent of location, culture, and time. It should be fundamental and universal in the same way that the number p defines the ratio between the diameter and the circumference of a circle. The term “universal” therefore means all-embracing and for general propose.Universal Ontology of Geographic Space: Semantic Enrichment for Spatial Data aims to escalate the current scope of research to support the development of semantically interoperable systems of geographic space. This reference will aid university lecturers and professors, students, researchers, developers of spatial applications.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. Editorial Advisory Board
    2. List of Reviewers
  5. Foreword
    1. WORLD-WIDE ONTOLOGY FRAMEWORK
    2. GEOGRAPHICAL SPACE, GEOGRAPHY, AND GEO-ONTOLOGY
    3. GLOBAL GEO-ONTOLOGY AND ONTOLOGICAL GEO-SPACE: AN N-DIMENSIONAL GEO-SPACE
    4. INTEROPERABILITY
    5. PLANETARY GEO-SPACE APPLICATIONS: ENVIRONMENT INFRASTRUCTURE
    6. ENVIRONMENTAL LESSONS
    7. THE CONTENT
  6. Preface
    1. OVERVIEW
    2. CONCLUSION
  7. Acknowledgment
  8. Section 1: Towards a Universal Ontology in the Spatial Domain
    1. Chapter 1: Universal Geospatial Ontology for the Semantic Interoperability of Data
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. RISKS OF DATA MISINTERPRETATION RELATED TO THE UNIVERSAL GEOSPATIAL ONTOLOGY
      5. A RISK MANAGEMENT APPROACH TO DEAL WITH DATA MISINTERPRETATION IN THE UGO-BASED INTEROPERABILITY
      6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      7. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 2: Geographic Space Ontology, Locus-Object, and Spatial Data Representation Semantic Theory
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. CARTOGRAPHY AND GEOGRAPHY OF THE GEOGRAPHIC SPACE
      3. DESCRIPTION AND REPRESENTATION OF THE EARTH SURFACE: THE GEOGRAPHIC SPACE
      4. SPATIAL RULES OF THE WHOLE-PART LOGIC IN GEOMATICS
      5. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION: LOCALIZATION AND MAP, LOCUS-OBJECT AND GEOMAP
      6. DIGITAL REPRESENTATION OF THE GEOGRAPHIC SPACE: IMAGE, CARTOGRAPHY, AND LOCUS-OBJECT RECOGNITION
      7. MORPHOGENETIC GEOMAPS
      8. CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 3: Toward an Architecture for Enhancing Semantic Interoperability Based on Enrichment of Geospatial Data Semantics
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. A CONCEPTUAL ARCHITECTURE FOR ENHANCING SEMANTIC INTEROPERABILITY BASED ON ENRICHMENT OF GEOSPATIAL DATA SEMANTICS
      5. APPLICATION EXAMPLE
      6. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 4: Geographical Process Representation
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. APPROACHES TO MODELLING GEOGRAPHICAL PROCESSES
      5. OPEN ISSUES AND DESIDERATA FOR A UNIVERSAL ONTOLOGY OF GEOGRAPHICAL PROCESSES
      6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      7. CONCLUSION
    5. Chapter 5: Human Cognition
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      4. CONCLUSION
  9. Section 2: Applied Ontologies in the Spatial Domain
    1. Chapter 6: Representing Geospatial Concepts
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. ONTOLOGICAL REPRESENTATION AND REASONING
      5. DEVELOPING RICHER GEOSPATIAL ONTOLOGIES
      6. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 7: Ontology Engineering Method for Integrating Building Models
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND
      4. RESULTS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
      5. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 8: Semantically Enriched POI as Ontological Foundation for Web-Based and Mobile Spatial Applications
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CHARACTERISTICS OF POINTS
      4. SEMANTIC ENRICHMENT OF POI
      5. SAME OBJECTS – DIFFERENT CONCEPTUALIZATIONS
      6. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 9: Ontologies for the Design of Ecosystems
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. ECOSYSTEMS IN AN ONTOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF GEOGRAPHIC OBJECTS
      4. CASE STUDY
      5. UTILITY ONTOLOGIES
      6. KNOWLEDGE SHARING
      7. KNOWLEDGE MODELING USING UTILITY ONTOLOGIES
      8. CONCLUSION
    5. Chapter 10: Unified Rule Approach and the Semantic Enrichment of Economic Movement Data
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. DATA SET
      5. KEY CONCEPTS OF ECONOMIC MOVEMENT DATA
      6. EVOLUTIONARY ONTOLOGY
      7. DEFINING THE SEMANTICS OF TRAJECTORIES
      8. SEMANTIC ANNOTATION
      9. TOWARDS A UNIVERSAL ANALYTICAL ONTOLOGY OF ECONOMIC MOVEMENT BEHAVIOR
      10. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      11. CONCLUSION
  10. Compilation of References
  11. About The Contributors