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Ubiquitous Computing: Design, Implementation, and Usability

Book Description

"Interactive systems in the mobile, ubiquitous, and virtual environments are at a stage of development where designers and developers are keen to find out more about design, use and usability of these systems.

Ubiquitous Computing: Design, Implementation and Usability highlights the emergent usability theories, techniques, tools and best practices in these environments. This book shows that usable and useful systems are able to be achieved in ways that will improve usability to enhance user experiences. Research on the usability issues for young children, teenagers, adults, and the elderly is presented, with different techniques for the mobile, ubiquitous, and virtual environments."

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface
    1. ORGANISATION
    2. OVERVIEW
  3. I. Introduction to Ubiquitous Computing and Related Works
    1. I. Ubiquitous Computing History, Development, and Scenarios
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
        1. History and Vision of Ubiquitous Computing
      3. CURRENT RESEARCH CHALLENGES
        1. Design Architecture and Systems
        2. Design and Implementation Challenges
      4. SINGAPORE AS A CASE EXAMPLE: DISCUSSION OF SCENARIOS IN EDUCATION
        1. Scenario 1
        2. Scenario 2
        3. Scenario 3
        4. Scenario 4
      5. CONCLUSION
      6. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      7. REFERENCES
    2. II. Pervasive Computing: What is it Anyway?
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INSIDE CHAPTER
      3. INTRODUCTION
      4. A FIRST GLANCE AT PERVASIVE COMPUTING
      5. PERVASIVE NETWORKING
        1. Mobility
          1. The Degrees of Mobility
        2. Host Discovery
      6. CONTEXT IN PERVASIVE COMPUTING
        1. A Definition of Context
        2. Context Aware Applications
      7. DEVELOPMENT OF PERVASIVE COMPUTING SYSTEMS
        1. The Component-Based Approach
          1. The Component-Based Approach in Pervasive Computing
        2. Plug-in-Based Architectures
          1. Plug-in-Based Architectures in Pervasive Computing
        3. Event-Based Systems
          1. The Event-Based Approach in Pervasive Computing
      8. MIDDLEWARE FOR PERVASIVE COMPUTING
        1. Pervasive Computing Middleware Solutions
          1. Jini
          2. OSGi
          3. RCSM
          4. SOCAM
          5. Aura
      9. CURRENT AND FUTURE TRENDS IN PERVASIVE COMPUTING RESEARCH
      10. PERVASIVE COMPUTING FOR KNOWLEDGE AND LEARNING MANAGEMENT
      11. CONCLUSION
      12. REFERENCES
      13. ENDNOTE
    3. A. APPENDIX I: INTERNET SECTION: UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING GRAND CHALLENGE
      1. Interaction
    4. B. APPENDIX II: CASE STUDY
      1. A Usual Day with Pervasive Computing
      2. Questions
    5. C. APPENDIX III: USEFUL URLS
    6. D. APPENDIX IV: FURTHER READING
    7. E. APPENDIX V: POSSIBLE PAPER TITLES/ESSAYS
  4. II. New User Issues
    1. III. Convergence Broadcast and Telecommunication Services: What are Real Users' Needs?
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. USER-CENTERED DESIGN (UCD) IN DESIGNING MOBILE SERVICES
      4. PHASES IN HF WORK IN INSTINCT
        1. First Step: Scenarios Validation
        2. Second Step: Specific Requirements
          1. Mobile TV
          2. Personalized Alerting
      5. MOCK-UP AND USABILITY EVALUATIONS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      8. REFERENCES
      9. KEY TERMS
        1. Glossary
      10. ENDNOTES
    2. IV. Warranting High Perceived Quality of Experience (PQoE) in Pervasive Interactive Multimedia Systems
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE QUALITY OF EXPERIENCE IN PERVASIVE INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA SYSTEM
      4. BACKGROUND
      5. DESIGN IMPLICATIONS, CONTROVERSIES, AND PROBLEMS
      6. METHODOLOGY FOR THE DESIGN OF SCENARIOS IN MOBILE AND PERVASIVE INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS
      7. REVIEW OF RESULTS
        1. First Conceptual Prototypes
          1. Handheld
          2. Public Interactive Display
          3. Personal Interactive Map
          4. In-Car Multimedia Communication System
          5. Memory Pin
      8. FUTURE WORK
      9. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ENDNOTES
    3. V. Interacting with Interaction Histories in a History-Enriched Environment
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE TEMPORAL ASPECT OF UBIQUITY
        1. Time, History, and Social Settings
        2. History-Enriched Environments
      4. TOWARD BUILDING HISTORY-ENRICHED ENVIRONMENTS
        1. Public Displays
        2. Calm Technologies
      5. THE OPTICAL STAIN ENVIRONMENT
        1. System Overview
        2. The Optical Stain Design
          1. Supporting On-Location Awareness
          2. Supporting Personal Exploration of Relevant Information
      6. CONCLUDING REMARKS
      7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      8. REFERENCES
    4. VI. A User Acceptance Study on a Plant Mixed Reality System for Primary School Children
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. MIXED REALITY APPLICATIONS IN EDUCATION
      3. PLANT MIXED REALITY SYSTEM (PMRS)
      4. THE STUDY
        1. Motivation and Theoretical Model
        2. Objectives
        3. Modified Technology Acceptance Model and Hypotheses
            1. Set H1 Hypotheses: Experience-related
            2. Set H2 Hypotheses: System-related
            3. Set H3 Hypotheses: Individual-related
            4. Set H4 Hypotheses: Social influence-related
            5. Set H5 Hypotheses: Overall Perception
        4. Protocol
      5. RESULTS AND ANALYSES
        1. Students' Response
          1. General Response
          2. Experience-Related Response
          3. System-Related Response
          4. Individual-Related Response and Profiles
          5. Social Influence-Related Response
        2. Hypotheses Testing
          1. Set H1 Hypotheses: Experience-Related
          2. Set H2 Hypotheses: System-Related
          3. Set H3 Hypotheses: Individual-Related
          4. Set H4 Hypotheses: Social influence-related
          5. Set H5 Hypotheses: Overall Perception
      6. DISCUSSION AND DESIGN IMPLICATIONS
        1. Experience-Related Findings
        2. System-Related Findings
        3. Individual-Related Findings
        4. Social Influence-Related Findings
        5. TAM-Related Findings
      7. CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK
      8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      9. REFERENCES
      10. KEY TERMS
        1. Glossary
    5. VII. Human-Based Models for Ambient Intelligence Environments
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. FUZZY MARKUP LANGUAGE
        1. Fuzzy Markup Language and Fuzzy Logic Control
        2. Distributed Fuzzy Control
        3. H2ML: Human to Markup Language
        4. Vertical and Horizontal Fuzzy Distribution
          1. Experimental Results
      4. CONCLUSION
      5. REFERENCES
  5. III. New Supporting Technological Issues
    1. VIII. Wireless Technologies for Mobile Computing
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. IEEE 802.11 INFRASTRUCTURE WIRELESS NETWORK
      4. 802.11 WLAN STANDARDS AND CO-EXISTENCE ANALYSIS
        1. Security Issues
      5. IEEE 802.11 AD HOC WIRELESS NETWORK
        1. Demand Driven Routing Protocols in Ad Hoc Networks
        2. Performance Analysis of Demand Driven Protocols
      6. BLUETOOTH NETWORK
        1. The BWIG Architecture
        2. The Bluetooth Public Access Reference Network Architecture
        3. The BlueStar Architecture
        4. The Interference and Security Issues
      7. HOMERF NETWORK
      8. USER ACCEPTANCE OF WIRELESS TECHNOLOGIES
      9. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
      11. KEY TERMS
        1. Glossary
    2. IX. Context Sensitive Mobile Services
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
        1. Benefits of Context Sensitive Services
      4. BUSINESS MODELS FOR CMCS
        1. CSMS and Information Quality
        2. Push Model
        3. Pull Model
        4. Classification of CSMS
        5. Strategies for CSMS
      5. FUTURE TRENDS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
    3. X. Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Design Principles and Low Power Operation
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. STANDARDISATION AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES
      4. WIRELESS AD HOC NETWORKS DESIGN
        1. Medium Access Control
        2. Random Access MAC
        3. Fixed Assignment MAC
        4. Routing and Reliable Data Transfer
      5. LOW POWER OPERATION OF WIRELESS AD HOC NETWORKS
        1. Link-Layer Power Management
        2. Network-Layer Power Management
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS
        1. Glossary
    4. XI. TeleTables and Window Seat: Bilocative Furniture Interfaces
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. RELATED WORK
      4. FURNITURE MEDIATING AMBIENT COMMUNICATION (TELETABLES)
        1. Design Schematic and Diagram
        2. Electronics
      5. FURNITURE AS A LINK TO A REMOTE PLACE (WINDOW SEAT)
        1. Design Schematic and Diagrams
        2. Placement of Projector and Mirror Housing
      6. DISCUSSION AND FUTURE WORK
        1. Future Work
        2. Discussion
      7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      8. REFERENCES
    5. XII. Using Multimedia and Virtual Reality for Web-Based Collaborative Learning on Multiple Platforms
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INSIDE CHAPTER
      3. INTRODUCTION
      4. BACKGROUND
        1. A Brief History of Distance Learning
          1. Distance Learning Meets E-Learning
        2. 3D, Collaborative, and Mobile Technologies
          1. 3D Computer Applications
          2. Multi-User Applications
          3. Mobile Applications
      5. 3D AND COLLABORATIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR E-LEARNING AND M-LEARNING
        1. 3D Learning Tools
        2. Collaborative 3D Learning Environments
        3. Mobile Learning Environments
      6. COLLABORATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT WITH VIRTUAL REALITY (CLEV-R)
        1. Sample Scenario
        2. User Representation
        3. Communication Tools
        4. Interactive Tools
          1. Lecture Room
          2. Meeting Rooms
          3. Social Rooms
          4. Library
        5. Evaluation and Discussion
        6. mCLEV-R
      7. FUTURE TRENDS FOR COLLABORATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS WITH VIRTUAL REALITY
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
    6. F. APPENDIX I: INTERNET SESSION
      1. C-VISions: Collaborative Virtual Interactive Simulations
    7. G. APPENDIX II: CASE STUDY
    8. H. APPENDIX III: USEFUL LINKS
    9. I. APPENDIX IV: FURTHER READING
    10. J. APPENDIX V: POSSIBLE PAPER TITLES/ESSAYS
    11. XIII. Leveraging Pervasive and Ubiquitous Service Computing
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MOBILE COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
        1. Wireless PANS
        2. Wireless LANs
        3. Wireless MANs
        4. Wireless NANs
        5. Wireless WANs
        6. Ultrawideband (UWB)
        7. Mesh Radio and Mess Networks
        8. Sensor Networks
        9. Pervasive Devices
        10. Traditional Telephones, Pagers, and Cell Phones
        11. Smart Phones, Wireless PDAs, and Blackberry Devices
        12. Laptop or Tablet PCs with Wireless Access
        13. IP Phones
        14. Orbs (Ambient Devices)
        15. Input Technologies: Dictation, Anoto Pen, and Projection Keyboard
        16. Application Scenarios
      4. COMMUNICATION: UNIFIED COMMUNICATION AND INSTANT COMMUNICATION
        1. Mobile Access to Information and Applications
          1. Sales-Force Automation
          2. Dashboard or Project-Portfolio Management
          3. Facility Management and Other On-Site Service Applications
        2. Remote Access to Corporate Network
        3. Location-Based Services
        4. User-Interaction Models
        5. A Service-Oriented Architecture to Support Pervasive Computing
      5. FUTURE DIRECTIONS
      6. REFERENCES
  6. IV. New Usability Engineering Approaches
    1. XIV. A Software Engineering Perspective on Ubiquitous Computing Systems
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. FEATURES OF UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING
      4. CHALLENGES FOR DEVELOPING UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING SYSTEMS
      5. REQUIREMENTS FOR UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING SYSTEMS
        1. Adaptation
        2. Dynamic Update
        3. Context Awareness
      6. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING FOR UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING
        1. Component-Based Development
        2. Plug-In-Based Architectures
        3. Event-Based Systems
        4. Service-Oriented Computing
        5. Dynamic Software Evolution
      7. UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING IN PRACTICE
      8. JCAF
        1. Wings
      9. RUNES
        1. Draco
      10. FUTURE TRENDS
      11. CONCLUSION
      12. REFERENCES
      13. KEY TERMS
        1. Glossary
      14. ENDNOTES
  7. XV. When Ubiquitous Computing Meets Experience Design: Identifying Challenges for Design and Evaluation
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. FEATURES OF UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING
    4. UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND EXPERIENCE DESIGN: WHEN BOTH WORLDS MEET
      1. New Design Dimensions
      2. New Design Goals
      3. New Designers' Roles
    5. FROM INTERACTION DESIGN TO USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN
    6. DESIGN AND EVALUATION CHALLENGES
    7. EVALUATING EXPERIENCE USING UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING
      1. Explicit Methods
      2. Implicit Methods
    8. A DESIGN RESEARCH STUDY: EXPERIENCE DESIGN FOR POLICE OFFICERS
      1. Rapid Ethnography: Developing Storylines
    9. UBICOMP IN THE KITCHEN
    10. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION
    11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    12. REFERENCES
    13. KEY TERMS
      1. Glossary
  8. XVI. Building Applications to Establish Location Awareness: New Approaches to Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Mobile and Ubiquitous Interfaces
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. CATEGORIZING INDOOR LOCATION DETERMINATION TECHNIQUES
      1. Sniffing
      2. Web-Services Model
      3. Smart Algorithms
    5. BUILDING INTERFACES FOR LOCATION-KNOWLEDGEABLE DEVICES
      1. Agile Software Development, Usability Engineering, and Agile Usability
      2. Case Study 1: Alumni Tour Guide
      3. Case Study 2: VTAssist
      4. Case Study 3: Conference Center Guide
    6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
    7. REFERENCES
    8. KEY TERMS
      1. Glossary
  9. XVII. Interactive Tables: Requirements, Design Recommendations, and Implementation
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION
    3. RELATED WORK
      1. Collaborative Interactive Tabletop Systems
      2. Digital Pen
    4. DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
      1. Integration and Combination with Traditional Tables
      2. Shape, Size, and Height of the Interactive Table
      3. Transition Between Personal and Group Work
      4. Appropriate Arrangements of Users
      5. Support for Interpersonal Interaction
      6. Fluid Transitions Between Activities
      7. Transition Between Collaboration and External Work
      8. Support of Physical Objects
      9. Shared Access to both Physical and Digital Objects
      10. Support of Simultaneous User Interaction
    5. TECHNICAL IMPLEMENTATION
      1. Display
      2. Tracking
    6. SHARED DESIGN SPACE
      1. Hardware Setup
      2. Implementation
    7. USER STUDY
      1. Apparatus
      2. Task
      3. Participants
      4. Procedure
    8. RESULTS
      1. Learnability
      2. Interaction
      3. Interaction Devices
      4. Space
      5. Awareness and Collaboration
    9. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
    10. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    11. REFERENCES
    12. ENDNOTES
  10. XVIII. A Case Study of Icon-Scenario Based Animated Menu's Concept Development
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. THE DESIGN WORKFLOW
      1. Case Study: E1200
      2. E1200 Task Flow
      3. Prototype
      4. Simulation
      5. Implementation
      6. Pros and Cons of the Design Process
    4. DESIGN METHODOLOGY
      1. Icon Based Menu
      2. Scenario Based Animated Menu
      3. Icon-Scenario Based Animated menu
    5. DESIGN CRITERIA
    6. DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
    7. CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
      1. Theme Inspiration
      2. Animated Scenarios
      3. Color Selection
      4. Icons
      5. Text
      6. GUI Specification
    8. USABILITY EVALUATION
      1. Method
      2. Participants
      3. Procedure
      4. Results and Discussion
    9. CONCLUSION
    10. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    11. REFERENCES
    12. KEY TERMS
      1. Glossary
  11. XIX. Formalizing Patterns with the User Requirements Notation
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. FORMALIZING PATTERNS
    4. RELATED WORK
    5. USER REQUIREMENTS NOTATION
    6. FORMALIZING FORCES FOR TRADE-OFF ANALYSIS
    7. FORMALIZING PATTERN SOLUTIONS
    8. OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED PROCESS
    9. APPLICATION TO A CASE STUDY
      1. Feedback Control Framework
      2. Candidate Patterns for the Case Study
      3. Trade-Off Analysis
    10. DISCUSSION AND FUTURE TRENDS
    11. CONCLUSION
    12. REFERENCES
  12. K. APPENDIX
  13. L. Appendix: Sources of Further Information
    1. 1. HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION
      1. Journals
      2. Others
      3. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
    2. 2. USER MODELING
      1. Journals
      2. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
      3. Others
      4. Journal Special Issue
    3. 3. USER DESIGN
      1. Journals
      2. Others
      3. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
    4. 4. COMPUTER MEDIATED COMMUNICATION
      1. Journals
      2. Others
      3. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
      4. Other Related Conferences
    5. 5. UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING
      1. Journals
      2. Others
      3. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
      4. Other Related Conferences
    6. 6. MOBILE HCI
      1. Journals
      2. Others
      3. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
      4. Other Related Conferences
    7. 7. USABILITY EVALUATION
      1. Journals
      2. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
      3. Other Related Conferences
    8. 8. ERGONOMICS
      1. Journals
      2. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
      3. Others
    9. 9. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
      1. Journals
      2. Others
      3. Conferences/Proceedings/Workshops
  14. Compilation of References
  15. About the Contributors