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Twitter Marketing: An Hour a Day

Book Description

The complete guide to a successful Twitter marketing campaign

Twitter is a microblogging service that's changing the way we communicate. Marketers recognize its value, and Twitter Marketing: An Hour a Day offers marketers, advertisers, brand managers, PR professionals, and business owners an in-depth guide to designing, implementing, and measuring the impact of a complete Twitter strategy.

Expert author Hollis Thomases acquaints you with the Twitterverse, its conventions, and its fascinating demographics and statistics. She then teaches you step by step how to effectively craft successful branding and direct response strategies that can be scaled to any organization and its objectives. Twitter Marketing: An Hour a Day uses interesting case studies, success stories, anecdotes, and examples to demonstrate how to use Twitter metrics in order to inform strategic direction. You'll discover how top companies-large and small-have leveraged this exciting communications platform.

  • Twitter has become a phenomenon with 32 million users, including major companies such as Apple, JetBlue, and CNN

  • This step-by-step guide explains the demographics, shows how companies are using Twitter, and explains how to scale the approach to your enterprise

  • The detailed coverage includes the basics for Twitter newcomers and explores all elements of a successful strategy

  • Expert author Hollis Thomases shows how to set goals, develop and implement a plan, attract followers, and measure the impact of a campaign

  • The in-depth book explains how to maintain momentum and explores such issues as contests, promotions, and crisis management

Twitter Marketing: An Hour a Day is the ultimate guide to succeeding one tweet at a time!

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Dear Reader,
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. About the Author
  5. Foreword
  6. Introduction
    1. 0.1.
      1. 0.1.1. How to Use This Book
  7. I. Get to Know Twitter
    1. 1. Understand Twitter
      1. 1.1. Twitter History and Definitions
        1. 1.1.1. Twitter Defined
        2. 1.1.2. Why Should I Use Twitter?
        3. 1.1.3. Some Important Twitter Vernacular
        4. 1.1.4. Twitter by the Numbers
        5. 1.1.5. What Twitter Is Not
      2. 1.2. Twitter's Technology
        1. 1.2.1. Twittering on the Web
        2. 1.2.2. Twittering on the Go
        3. 1.2.3. Follow the Leader
        4. 1.2.4. Twitter's Open Source API
        5. 1.2.5. Twittering on the Go
      3. 1.3. Twitter's Rapid Ascent
      4. 1.4. Twitter's Financial Future
      5. 1.5. What Makes Tweeps Tick?
        1. 1.5.1. Simplicity
          1. 1.5.1.1. Short and Sweet
          2. 1.5.1.2. Low Barriers to Entry
            1. 1.5.1.2.1. Account Creation
            2. 1.5.1.2.2. Just Start Typing
            3. 1.5.1.2.3. Find Friends
        2. 1.5.2. Ease of Use
          1. 1.5.2.1. Straightforward Design
          2. 1.5.2.2. Simple Controls
        3. 1.5.3. Low Level of Commitment
        4. 1.5.4. High Level of Control
          1. 1.5.4.1. You Own Your Message
          2. 1.5.4.2. Interact with Who You Want, When You Want
          3. 1.5.4.3. Block Unwanted Users
          4. 1.5.4.4. Privacy Protections
      6. 1.6. Twitter's Culture
        1. 1.6.1. Sense of Community
        2. 1.6.2. Rhetorical Nature
        3. 1.6.3. Brutal Honesty
        4. 1.6.4. Twetiquette
        5. 1.6.5. Vocabulary and Acronyms
      7. 1.7. The Main Points
    2. 2. Who's Using Twitter for What?
      1. 2.1. Demographics
        1. 2.1.1. The Data
        2. 2.1.2. The Social Media Framework
      2. 2.2. Individual Users
        1. 2.2.1. Twitter's Early Adopters
          1. 2.2.1.1. The Geeks
          2. 2.2.1.2. The Evangelists
          3. 2.2.1.3. The Curious
          4. 2.2.1.4. The Reinventors
        2. 2.2.2. Twitter Profiles Types
          1. 2.2.2.1. Newbies and Inactives
          2. 2.2.2.2. Casual/Social Users
          3. 2.2.2.3. Multilevel Marketers, Get-Rich-Quick Schemers, and Quickie Salesmen
          4. 2.2.2.4. The Antagonist
          5. 2.2.2.5. Company Guy/Gal
          6. 2.2.2.6. Power Users
          7. 2.2.2.7. Moms as Power Users
          8. 2.2.2.8. Experts
          9. 2.2.2.9. Content Producers
          10. 2.2.2.10. Celebrities
      3. 2.3. Bots, Games, and Memes
        1. 2.3.1. Twitter Bots
        2. 2.3.2. Games
        3. 2.3.3. Memes
      4. 2.4. Small and Home-Based Businesses
        1. 2.4.1. Small Business Twitter Stories
        2. 2.4.2. Local Business Using Twitter
      5. 2.5. Not-for-Profits: Charities, Causes, the Arts, Houses of Worship, and Associations
      6. 2.6. Academia and Higher Education
      7. 2.7. Government
      8. 2.8. Marketing, Advertising, Public Relations, and Communications Professionals
      9. 2.9. Media Outlets
      10. 2.10. Sports and Entertainment
      11. 2.11. Corporations and Brands
        1. 2.11.1. Brands on Twitter
        2. 2.11.2. The Role of the Community Manager
      12. 2.12. The Main Points
    3. 3. Twitter, the Multipurpose Platform
      1. 3.1. What Twitter Can Accomplish
        1. 3.1.1. What Brands Can Gain through Twitter
        2. 3.1.2. Meet New People and Socialize Your Brand
          1. 3.1.2.1. Meet Your Customers on Twitter
          2. 3.1.2.2. Meet Your Twitter Customers Offline
            1. 3.1.2.2.1. Twitter Tools for Local Search
            2. 3.1.2.2.2. Monitor and Attend Twitter Events in Your Area
          3. 3.1.2.3. Meet Your Peers on Twitter
        3. 3.1.3. Outreach
          1. 3.1.3.1. Establish a Network
          2. 3.1.3.2. Get in the Conversation
          3. 3.1.3.3. Micro–Focus Groups
        4. 3.1.4. Brand Building
        5. 3.1.5. Sales and Lead Generation
          1. 3.1.5.1. Important Lead Generation Considerations
        6. 3.1.6. Customer Service
      2. 3.2. Key Questions to Consider for Branding
      3. 3.3. The Main Points
  8. II. Month 1: Master Twitter Fundamentals
    1. 4. Week 1: Get on Twitter
      1. 4.1. Monday: Create an Account
        1. 4.1.1. Single Accounts
        2. 4.1.2. Multiple Accounts
        3. 4.1.3. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Create a Twitter Account
        4. 4.1.4. Usernames for Individuals
        5. 4.1.5. Usernames for Brands
        6. 4.1.6. I Created My Account. Now What?
        7. 4.1.7. Before You Start Using Your Twitter Account
        8. 4.1.8. Account
        9. 4.1.9. Picture
        10. 4.1.10. Design
        11. 4.1.11. Customize Your Twitter Background
      2. 4.2. Tuesday: Find People to Follow
        1. 4.2.1. Start Building Your Following with Twitter's Help
        2. 4.2.2. Find People to Follow Using Online Resources and Third-Party Tools
        3. 4.2.3. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Start Finding People to Follow
      3. 4.3. Wednesday: Learn Twitter Lingo
        1. 4.3.1. @Replies, Direct Messages, and Retweets
          1. 4.3.1.1. @Replies
          2. 4.3.1.2. Direct Messages
          3. 4.3.1.3. Retweets
        2. 4.3.2. Hashtags
        3. 4.3.3. Shortened URLs
        4. 4.3.4. Other Short Stuff
          1. 4.3.4.1. Helpful Abbreviations
          2. 4.3.4.2. Twitter Keys
          3. 4.3.4.3. Fun with Twitter Lingo
          4. 4.3.4.4. Can't Forget the Fail Whale
        5. 4.3.5. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Simple Tweets
      4. 4.4. Thursday: Access Twitter
        1. 4.4.1. Twitter Desktop Clients
        2. 4.4.2. Twitter Browser Clients
        3. 4.4.3. Web-Based Clients
        4. 4.4.4. Mobile Twitter Clients
        5. 4.4.5. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Familiarize Yourself with Other Twitter Clients
      5. 4.5. Friday: From Lurking to Leaping
        1. 4.5.1. The Art of Tweeting
          1. 4.5.1.1. Engaging Tweets
        2. 4.5.2. Participate and Contribute
        3. 4.5.3. Twitter Etiquette Dos and Don'ts
      6. 4.6. The Main Points
    2. 5. Week 2: Find and Attract Followers
      1. 5.1. Followers and Following
        1. 5.1.1. Preliminary Exercise
      2. 5.2. Monday: Use Basic Search to Find Followers
        1. 5.2.1. Twitter's Search Tools
        2. 5.2.2. Evaluate Users as Potential Followers
          1. 5.2.2.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Searches to Find Followers
      3. 5.3. Tuesday: Add New Friends
        1. 5.3.1. Directories and Tools
        2. 5.3.2. Other Kinds of Tweeps to Follow and Why
          1. 5.3.2.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Test Drive Directories and Tools
      4. 5.4. Wednesday: Attract Followers
        1. 5.4.1. Principles of Engagement
        2. 5.4.2. Collective Mentality
        3. 5.4.3. Timely Tweets
        4. 5.4.4. Auto-Follow and Auto-DM
          1. 5.4.4.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Practice Rules of Engagement
      5. 5.5. Thursday: Syndicate Your Tweet Content
        1. 5.5.1. Twitter Widgets
        2. 5.5.2. Specialized Feeds
        3. 5.5.3. Push Tools
          1. 5.5.3.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Get Comfortable with Content Tools
      6. 5.6. Friday: Tools to Help Build and Manage Followers
        1. 5.6.1. The Advantages and Disadvantages of Tools
        2. 5.6.2. Follower Identification and Management Tools
          1. 5.6.2.1. Tools to Help Identify Tweeps
          2. 5.6.2.2. Tools to Help Manage Tweeps
            1. 5.6.2.2.1. Twitter Clients Help Manage Tweeps
        3. 5.6.3. A Word about Unfollows
          1. 5.6.3.1. Friday's One-Hour Exercise: Start Managing Your Tweeps
      7. 5.7. The Main Points
    3. 6. Week 3: Use Twitter Search and Other Tools to Improve Your Experience
      1. 6.1. Search and Other Tools for Twitter
      2. 6.2. Monday: Master Twitter Search
        1. 6.2.1. Monday's Preliminary Exercise
        2. 6.2.2. Twitter's Built-In Search
        3. 6.2.3. Advanced Twitter Search
        4. 6.2.4. Other Search Tools
          1. 6.2.4.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Make Search Relevant
      3. 6.3. Tuesday: Use Tools to Enrich Your Tweets
        1. 6.3.1. Tuesday's Preliminary Exercise
        2. 6.3.2. What's in a Link?
        3. 6.3.3. Links for Verbosity
        4. 6.3.4. Surveys and Polls
        5. 6.3.5. Multimedia
        6. 6.3.6. Other Uses of Links
          1. 6.3.6.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Create Enhanced Tweet Content
      4. 6.4. Wednesday: Analyze Your Twitter Activity
        1. 6.4.1. Wednesday's Preliminary Exercise
        2. 6.4.2. Twitter Statistics
        3. 6.4.3. Twitter Rank and Impact
        4. 6.4.4. Retweet Statistics
        5. 6.4.5. Return on "I" Twitter Metrics
          1. 6.4.5.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Practice Measuring and Analyzing
      5. 6.5. Thursday: Experiment with Other Useful Twitter Tools
        1. 6.5.1.
          1. 6.5.1.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Use Tools
      6. 6.6. Friday: Fun with Twitter Tools
        1. 6.6.1. Some Twitter Applications
          1. 6.6.1.1. Friday's One-Hour Exercise: Some Fun, Some Practice
      7. 6.7. The Main Points
    4. 7. Week 4: Track and Monitor What Twitter Generates for You
      1. 7.1. Twitter Metrics
        1. 7.1.1. Prelimary Exercise: Define Objectives
      2. 7.2. Monday: Understand What to Track and How to Review It
        1. 7.2.1. How Do Users Acquire Followers?
        2. 7.2.2. How Long Has Someone Been on Twitter?
        3. 7.2.3. Find the Number of People a User Is Following
        4. 7.2.4. What's Your Twitter Agenda?
        5. 7.2.5. Agenda + Action = Measurements
        6. 7.2.6. What You Can Track
          1. 7.2.6.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: A Study in Goal Setting
      3. 7.3. Tuesday: Alerts—Simple Tracking Tools
        1. 7.3.1.
          1. 7.3.1.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Set Up Twitter Alerts and Practice Tasks
      4. 7.4. Wednesday: Advanced Tracking Tools
        1. 7.4.1. Social Media Tracking for Anyone
        2. 7.4.2. Social Media Tracking for Business
        3. 7.4.3. Reputation Management Tools
          1. 7.4.3.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Social Media Tracking
      5. 7.5. Thursday: Compile Tracking Data
        1. 7.5.1. Metrics, Metrics, and More Metrics
          1. 7.5.1.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Compile Tracking Data
      6. 7.6. Friday: Review, Analyze, and Respond to Tracking Data
        1. 7.6.1. Information Dissemination
          1. 7.6.1.1. Publicize
          2. 7.6.1.2. Lead/Influence
          3. 7.6.1.3. Network
          4. 7.6.1.4. Provoke Thought
          5. 7.6.1.5. Entertain
          6. 7.6.1.6. Drive Traffic, Sales, Promotions, Leads, and List Building
          7. 7.6.1.7. Activate
        2. 7.6.2. Respond and React to Your Analysis
      7. 7.7. The Main Points
  9. III. Month 2: Develop and Launch Your Strategic Plan
    1. 8. Week 5: Develop a Successful Twitter Strategy
      1. 8.1. Monday: Study Brands Succeeding with Twitter
        1. 8.1.1. Deliver Customer Service
        2. 8.1.2. Build Awareness and Solicit Feedback
        3. 8.1.3. Progressions through Social Media
        4. 8.1.4. Build Relations/Hold Conversations
        5. 8.1.5. Promote/Boost Sales
        6. 8.1.6. Marketing on a Shoestring: Why Small Businesses and Nonprofits Use Twitter
        7. 8.1.7. No Strategy at All
          1. 8.1.7.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: A Study of Brand Strategies
      2. 8.2. Tuesday: Different Approaches to Develop Your Strategy
        1. 8.2.1. Validate Your Typical Customer's Use of Social Media
        2. 8.2.2. Manage Twitter Communications
          1. 8.2.2.1. Single User
          2. 8.2.2.2. Multiuser
          3. 8.2.2.3. Enterprise-Wide
        3. 8.2.3. Lay Out Your Strategy
          1. 8.2.3.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Map Your Strategy
      3. 8.3. Wednesday: Study Strategies for Market Verticals
        1. 8.3.1. Technology
        2. 8.3.2. Retail
        3. 8.3.3. Travel/Tourism
        4. 8.3.4. Restaurants/Franchises/Localized Businesses
        5. 8.3.5. Healthcare
        6. 8.3.6. Philanthropy and Nonprofit
          1. 8.3.6.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Analyze Your Industry
      4. 8.4. Thursday: Twitter's Role in Your Overall Marketing Strategy
        1. 8.4.1. Important First Impressions
          1. 8.4.1.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Compare Strategies
      5. 8.5. Friday: Avoid Pitfalls
        1. 8.5.1. Name Squatting
        2. 8.5.2. Trademark Infringement
        3. 8.5.3. Impersonation/Brand Hijacking
        4. 8.5.4. Dormant and Unresponsive Accounts
        5. 8.5.5. Overpromising
      6. 8.6. The Main Points
    2. 9. Week 6: Establish Goals and Get Corporate Buy-In
      1. 9.1. Monday: Establish Objectives
        1. 9.1.1. Monday's Preliminary Work: Think about Twitter Achievements
        2. 9.1.2. Case Studies Analyzed by Target Objectives
          1. 9.1.2.1. Twitter for Brand Launch
          2. 9.1.2.2. Twitter for Media Relations
          3. 9.1.2.3. Twitter for Thought Leadership
          4. 9.1.2.4. Twitter to Monitor Competition and Win New Customers
          5. 9.1.2.5. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Finalize Your Initial Twitter Marketing Objective
      2. 9.2. Tuesday: Measure and Report Upon Your Objectives
        1. 9.2.1. Define and Measure Baseline Metrics
        2. 9.2.2. Establish a Reporting Structure
          1. 9.2.2.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Establish Baseline Metrics and Report-Generation Schedule
      3. 9.3. Wednesday: Determine Tweet Topics
        1. 9.3.1. Tweet-Worthy Topics
        2. 9.3.2. Define Content Goals and Production Expectations
          1. 9.3.2.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: List Your Content Goals
      4. 9.4. Thursday: Assign Resources
        1. 9.4.1. Tweeting Interns
        2. 9.4.2. Who Should Tweet?
        3. 9.4.3. Assign Roles
          1. 9.4.3.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Assign Resources
      5. 9.5. Friday: Get Company Buy-In
        1. 9.5.1. Prepare the Pitch to Management
          1. 9.5.1.1. When Twitter Is Not Right for Your Business
          2. 9.5.1.2. Friday's One-Hour Exercise: Draft Your Pitch to Management
      6. 9.6. The Main Points
    3. 10. Week 7: Get Your Brand Started on Twitter
      1. 10.1. Monday: Claim Your Brand's Twitter Name
        1. 10.1.1. Select Your Twitter Name
        2. 10.1.2. Create Your Brand Account(s)
          1. 10.1.2.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Create Your Brand's Twitter Account(s)
      2. 10.2. Tuesday: Set Up Your Brand's Profile
        1. 10.2.1. Username
        2. 10.2.2. Location
        3. 10.2.3. More Info URL
        4. 10.2.4. One-Line Bio
        5. 10.2.5. Picture
        6. 10.2.6. Design
          1. 10.2.6.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Set Up Your Branded Profile
      3. 10.3. Wednesday: Your First Brand Tweets
        1. 10.3.1. Retweets
        2. 10.3.2. Provide Information/Answer Questions/Join the Conversation
        3. 10.3.3. Tweet Company/Brand Information
          1. 10.3.3.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Brand Tweeting
      4. 10.4. Thursday: Engage Your Brand's Followers
        1. 10.4.1. Who Follows a Brand?
        2. 10.4.2. Get Engaged
        3. 10.4.3. Your Twitter Commitment
      5. 10.5. Friday: Summarize Best Practices
      6. 10.6. The Main Points
    4. 11. Week 8: Monitor, Measure, and Valuate
      1. 11.1. Monday: Review Your Twitter Stats
        1. 11.1.1. Your Followers
        2. 11.1.2. Your Following
        3. 11.1.3. Ratios
        4. 11.1.4. Tweet Breakdown
        5. 11.1.5. Other Analysis
          1. 11.1.5.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Draw Lessons from Your Analysis
      2. 11.2. Tuesday: Analyze Your Website Traffic
        1. 11.2.1. Tuesday's Prep Work
        2. 11.2.2. Analyze Twitter-Generated Traffic
        3. 11.2.3. Twitter-Generated Action
          1. 11.2.3.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Analyze Traffic and Plan Your Next Steps
      3. 11.3. Wednesday: Analyze Actions
        1. 11.3.1. Measure Actions against Objectives
          1. 11.3.1.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Define Actions to Measure
      4. 11.4. Thursday: Valuate
        1. 11.4.1. Costs
        2. 11.4.2. The Upside
          1. 11.4.2.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Place Value on Your Twitter Efforts
      5. 11.5. Friday: Review Case Studies
        1. 11.5.1. Dell Outlet
        2. 11.5.2. Boloco
        3. 11.5.3. AMC Fork & Screen
        4. 11.5.4. Miller High Life
        5. 11.5.5. San Francisco Kitchen
        6. 11.5.6. Bob Evans
      6. 11.6. The Main Points
  10. IV. Month 3: Maintain Your Twitter Presence
    1. 12. Week 9: Institutionalize Maintenance
      1. 12.1. Monday: Hold Weekly Meetings
        1. 12.1.1. Review Key Findings
        2. 12.1.2. Lay Out the Week's Action Plan
        3. 12.1.3. Assign Roles and Responsibilities
          1. 12.1.3.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Hold a Twitter Status Meeting
      2. 12.2. Tuesday: Implement Weekly Action Plan
        1. 12.2.1. Your Commitment to Others
        2. 12.2.2. Check on New Followers
        3. 12.2.3. Address Brand Mentions
        4. 12.2.4. Trending Topics
        5. 12.2.5. Launch into Action
          1. 12.2.5.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Perform Action Plan Prep Work
      3. 12.3. Wednesday: Oversee Production Requirements
        1. 12.3.1. Considerations for Production
          1. 12.3.1.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Coordinate Production
      4. 12.4. Thursday: Prepare Documentation
        1. 12.4.1. Considerations for Documentation
          1. 12.4.1.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Prepare Documentation
      5. 12.5. Friday: Deliver Results to Management
        1. 12.5.1. Your Friday Routine
          1. 12.5.1.1. Friday's One-Hour Exercise: Wrap Up Your Week
      6. 12.6. The Main Points
    2. 13. Week 10: Prepare for Crisis Management
      1. 13.1. The Reality of Twitter Crises
        1. 13.1.1. Motrin Ad Makes Moms Mad
        2. 13.1.2. Mother's Day Flower Deliveries = #Fail
        3. 13.1.3. Crocs: Crisis Averted
      2. 13.2. Monday: List Potential Crises
        1. 13.2.1. The Crisis List
          1. 13.2.1.1. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Create Your Crisis List
      3. 13.3. Tuesday: Create a Fire Drill
        1. 13.3.1. Make It Realistic
          1. 13.3.1.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Execute Your Crisis Management Fire Drill
      4. 13.4. Wednesday: Write a Twitter Crisis Management Action Plan
        1. 13.4.1. Flesh Out Your Components
          1. 13.4.1.1. Crisis Response Team
          2. 13.4.1.2. Identify the Target Audience
        2. 13.4.2. Consider Other Possibilites
          1. 13.4.2.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Create Your Twitter Crisis Management Plan
      5. 13.5. Thursday: Know How to Really Say "I'm Sorry"
        1. 13.5.1. Apologize When Appropriate
        2. 13.5.2. Live It
          1. 13.5.2.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Remind Yourself of Your Company Values
      6. 13.6. Friday: Distribute Your Crisis Action Plan
        1. 13.6.1.
          1. 13.6.1.1. Friday's One-Hour Exercise: Search Twitter for Crisis Management in Action
      7. 13.7. The Main Points
    3. 14. Week 11: Develop a Direct Response Promotion for Twitter
      1. 14.1. Monday: Define the Need
        1. 14.1.1. Consider Direct Response Campaigns
          1. 14.1.1.1. Direct Response Tied to Brand Awareness
          2. 14.1.1.2. Get More Twitter Followers or Facebook Fans
          3. 14.1.1.3. Drive Traffic to Your Website
          4. 14.1.1.4. Events
          5. 14.1.1.5. Sales Promotion
          6. 14.1.1.6. Take Action for a Cause
          7. 14.1.1.7. Monday's One-Hour Exercise: Define Your Need
      2. 14.2. Tuesday: Define Campaign Components
        1. 14.2.1. Content
        2. 14.2.2. Timelines
        3. 14.2.3. Measurement Criteria
        4. 14.2.4. Announcement Strategy
          1. 14.2.4.1. Tuesday's One-Hour Exercise: Outline Your Campaign
      3. 14.3. Wednesday: Move to Production
        1. 14.3.1. Timing Production
          1. 14.3.1.1. Wednesday's One-Hour Exercise: Activate Production
      4. 14.4. Thursday: Work Your Announcement Strategy
        1. 14.4.1. Final Preparations
          1. 14.4.1.1. Thursday's One-Hour Exercise: Execute Your Announcement Strategy
      5. 14.5. Friday: Launch Your Campaign
        1. 14.5.1. What to Look For
          1. 14.5.1.1. Friday's One-Hour Exercise: Launch!
      6. 14.6. The Main Points
    4. A. Twitter-Related Glossary
    5. B. Twitter-Related Tools and Resources
    6. C. Tips from Tweeps
    7. D. Social Media Guidelines
      1. D.1. Eastman Kodak's Social Media Corporate Guidelines
        1. D.1.1. Maintaining a good reputation—yours and Kodak's
        2. D.1.2. Protecting your, and Kodak's, privacy and resources