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Tissue Engineering Using Ceramics and Polymers

Book Description

The second edition of Tissue Engineering Using Ceramics and Polymers comprehensively reviews the latest advances in this area rapidly evolving area of biomaterials science.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contributor contact details
  5. Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials
  6. Foreword
  7. Preface
  8. Part I: General issues: materials
    1. 1. Ceramic biomaterials for tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 1.1 Introduction
      3. 1.2 Characteristics of ceramics
      4. 1.3 Microstructure of ceramics
      5. 1.4 Properties of ceramics
      6. 1.5 Processing of ceramics
      7. 1.6 Conclusions and future trends
      8. 1.7 References
    2. 2. Polymeric biomaterials for tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 2.1 Introduction
      3. 2.2 Polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering
      4. 2.3 Polymeric scaffolds with controlled release capacity
      5. 2.4 Conclusions and future trends
      6. 2.5 Acknowledgements
      7. 2.6 References
    3. 3. Bioactive ceramics and glasses for tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 3.1 Introduction
      3. 3.2 Scaffolds for tissue engineering
      4. 3.3 Bioactive ceramics
      5. 3.4 Properties of bioactive ceramics
      6. 3.5 Tissue engineering applications of bioactive ceramics
      7. 3.6 Bioactive glasses
      8. 3.7 Preparation and properties of bioactive glasses
      9. 3.8 Bioactive glasses in tissue engineering
      10. 3.9 Bioactive glass–ceramics
      11. 3.10 Bioactive composites
      12. 3.11 Conclusions and future trends
      13. 3.12 References
    4. 4. Biodegradable and bioactive polymer/inorganic phase nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering (BTE)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 4.1 Introduction
      3. 4.2 Composite materials for bone tissue engineering
      4. 4.3 Nanocomposites for tissue engineering
      5. 4.4 Electrospinning
      6. 4.5 Electrospun composite scaffolds based on natural polymers
      7. 4.6 Electrospun composite scaffolds based on synthetic polymers
      8. 4.7 Natural and synthetic polymer combinations
      9. 4.8 Conclusions and future trends
      10. 4.9 Acknowledgement
      11. 4.10 References
  9. Part II: General issues: processing, characterisation and modelling
    1. 5. Nanoscale design in biomineralization for developing new biomaterials for bone tissue engineering (BTE)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 5.1 Introduction
      3. 5.2 Materials and techniques for nanoscale design
      4. 5.3 Nanoparticles
      5. 5.4 Nanofibers and nanotubes
      6. 5.5 Nanopatterns
      7. 5.6 Drug-delivery systems
      8. 5.7 Nanocomposites
      9. 5.8 Nanogels and injectable systems
      10. 5.9 Surface functionalization and templating
      11. 5.10 Conclusions and future trends
      12. 5.11 Acknowledgement
      13. 5.12 References
    2. 6. Characterisation of cells on biomaterial surfaces and tissue-engineered constructs using microscopy techniques
      1. Abstract:
      2. 6.1 Introduction
      3. 6.2 General considerations and experimental design
      4. 6.3 Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)
      5. 6.4 Combining techniques
      6. 6.5 Future trends
      7. 6.6 Sources of further information and advice
      8. Websites
      9. 6.7 References
    3. 7. Materials for perfusion bioreactors used in tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 7.1 Introduction
      3. 7.2 The need for large volume cell culturing
      4. 7.3 Bioreactors for tissue engineering
      5. 7.4 The future of large bioreactors through <em xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops">in vitro</em> mimicry of the stem cell niche mimicry of the stem cell niche
      6. 7.5 Conclusions and future trends
      7. 7.6 Acknowledgements
      8. 7.7 References
    4. 8. Transplantation of engineered cells and tissues
      1. Abstract:
      2. 8.1 Introduction
      3. 8.2 The immune response to tissue engineered products
      4. 8.3 Generality of the resistance of tissue engineered products to immune rejection
      5. 8.4 Testing and regulatory consequences
      6. 8.5 Comparison between autologous and allogeneic tissue engineering
      7. 8.6 Conclusions and future trends
      8. 8.7 Sources of further information and advice
      9. 8.8 Acknowledgements
      10. 8.9 References
    5. 9. Carrier systems and biosensors for biomedical applications
      1. Abstract:
      2. 9.1 Introduction
      3. 9.2 Carrier systems
      4. 9.3 Commercial systems
      5. 9.4 Biosensors
      6. 9.5 Continuous monitoring
      7. 9.6 Immunosensors for point-of-care testing
      8. 9.7 Future trends
      9. 9.8 Conclusions
      10. 9.9 References
    6. 10. From images to mathematical models: intravoxel micromechanics for ceramics and polymers
      1. Abstract:
      2. 10.1 Introduction
      3. 10.2 Conversion of voxel-specific computed tomography (CT) data into material composition (volume fractions)
      4. 10.3 Conversion of material composition into voxel-specific elastic properties
      5. 10.4 Intravoxel-micromechanics-enhanced finite element simulations
      6. 10.5 Conclusions and future trends
      7. 10.6 Acknowledgements
      8. 10.7 References and further reading
      9. 10.8 Appendix: nomenclature
  10. Part III: Tissue and organ regeneration
    1. 11. Engineering of tissues and organs
      1. Abstract:
      2. 11.1 Introduction
      3. 11.2 Native cells
      4. 11.3 Alternate cell sources: stem cells for use in tissue engineering
      5. 11.4 Biomaterials
      6. 11.5 Cellular therapies
      7. 11.6 Tissue engineering of specific structures
      8. 11.7 Vascularization of engineered tissues
      9. 11.8 Conclusions and future trends
      10. 11.9 References
    2. 12. Myocardial tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 12.1 Introduction
      3. 12.2 Cell sources
      4. 12.3 Biomaterials-based strategies in myocardial tissue engineering (MTE)
      5. 12.4 Potential scaffolding biomaterials
      6. 12.5 Conclusions and future trends
      7. 12.6 References and further reading
    3. 13. Kidney tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 13.1 Introduction
      3. 13.2 Limitations of hemodialysis (HD) as renal replacement therapy
      4. 13.3 Concept and configuration of bioartificial kidneys
      5. 13.4 Early developments in bioartificial kidney design
      6. 13.5 Present developments in bioartificial tubule devices
      7. 13.6 Bioartificial tubule devices in the treatment of acute kidney injuries with endotoxinaemia
      8. 13.7 Development of bioartificial renal tubule devices for long-term treatment
      9. 13.8 Development of a bioartificial glomerulus
      10. 13.9 Future trends
      11. 13.10 References
    4. 14. Bladder tissue regeneration
      1. Abstract:
      2. 14.1 Introduction
      3. 14.2 Concepts, strategies and biomaterials for bladder reconstruction and tissue engineering
      4. 14.3 Review of past and current strategies in bladder reconstruction
      5. 14.4 Cell conditioning in an external bioreactor
      6. 14.5 Future trends
      7. 14.6 Conclusions
      8. 14.7 References
    5. 15. Peripheral nerve tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 15.1 Introduction to the nervous system
      3. 15.2 Peripheral nerve injury and regeneration
      4. 15.3 Peripheral nerve repair
      5. 15.4 Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs)
      6. 15.5 Further structural optimisation of NGCs
      7. 15.6 Cultured cells for nerve repair
      8. 15.7 Conclusions
      9. 15.8 References
    6. 16. Tissue engineering of the small intestine
      1. Abstract:
      2. 16.1 Introduction
      3. 16.2 Approaches to tissue engineering of the small intestine
      4. 16.3 Scaffold selection
      5. 16.4 Guided tissue regeneration of the small intestine
      6. 16.5 Cell seeding sources
      7. 16.6 Combining cells and scaffolds
      8. 16.7 Growth factors
      9. 16.8 Conclusions and future trends
      10. 16.9 References
    7. 17. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 17.1 Introduction
      3. 17.2 Clinical and scientific applications
      4. 17.3 Characteristics of skeletal muscle
      5. 17.4 Potential scaffolds for skeletal muscle tissue engineering
      6. 17.5 Smart matrices
      7. 17.6 Electrospun scaffolds <em xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops">in vivo</em>/arteriovenous (AV)-loop models in the rat/arteriovenous (AV)-loop models in the rat
      8. 17.7 Conclusions and future trends
      9. 17.8 References
    8. 18. Cartilage tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 18.1 Introduction
      3. 18.2 Strategies for cartilage repair
      4. 18.3 The structure of articular cartilage
      5. 18.4 Biomaterials for articular cartilage replacement therapy
      6. 18.5 Conclusions
      7. 18.6 Future trends
      8. 18.7 Acknowledgement
      9. 18.8 References
    9. 19. Liver tissue engineering
      1. Abstract:
      2. 19.1 Introduction
      3. 19.2 Liver diseases and current treatments
      4. 19.3 <em xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops">In vitro</em> conditions for hepatocytes conditions for hepatocytes
      5. 19.4 <em xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops">In vitro</em> analysis of hepatocyte function analysis of hepatocyte function
      6. 19.5 Potential applications of engineered liver tissue
      7. 19.6 Conclusions and future trends
      8. 19.7 References
    10. 20. Collagen-based tubular constructs for tissue engineering applications
      1. Abstract:
      2. 20.1 Introduction
      3. 20.2 Current approaches to vascular tissue replacement and regeneration
      4. 20.3 Current approaches to airway tissue replacement, regeneration, and modelling
      5. 20.4 Type I collagen: the construction material
      6. 20.5 Cells: the construction workers
      7. 20.6 Culture conditions: the construction tools
      8. 20.7 Conclusions and future trends
      9. 20.8 References
    11. 21. Bioceramic nanoparticles for tissue engineering and drug delivery
      1. Abstract:
      2. 21.1 Introduction
      3. 21.2 Ceramic nanoparticles
      4. 21.3 Nanoparticles for drug delivery
      5. 21.4 Nanoparticles for gene transfer (transfection)
      6. 21.5 Nanoparticles for gene silencing
      7. 21.6 Fluorescent nanoparticles for imaging
      8. 21.7 Nanoparticles in tissue engineering
      9. 21.8 Conclusions and future trends
      10. 21.9 References
    12. 22. Multifunctional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering and <em xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops">in situ</em> drug delivery drug delivery
      1. Abstract:
      2. 22.1 Introduction
      3. 22.2 Scaffolds as drug carriers
      4. 22.3 Controlled release of therapeutic drugs for bone tissue engineering
      5. 22.4 Conclusions and future trends
      6. 22.5 References and further reading
  11. Index