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The World of Business: From Valuable Brands and Games Directors Play to Bail-Outs and Bad Boys

Book Description

How many billion spam emails are sent each day? Who said ’Business is a combination of war and sport’? How did Amazon.com and Volvo get their names? Which are the world’s most valuable brands? When and what was the Mississippi bubble? What did Xerox get seriously wrong in the 1970s? Which company ’exists to benefit and refresh everyone it touches’? How much do the best paid hedge fund managers earn? Which brand of coffee claimed to be ’Good to the last drop’? And how do you avoid seven years of bad sex in Germany? Full of facts and figures about all aspects of business, this miscellany gives the answers to all the above questions and many, many more with sections that include the biggest firms and biggest bankruptcies, business blunders and bad boys, leading management thinkers and past business giants, inventors and inventions, and famous patents. For anyone who needs proof that you can combine business with pleasure, here it is. ’Some regard private enterprise as if it were a predatory tiger to be shot. Others look upon it as a cow to be milked. Only a handful see it for what it really is - the strong horse that pulls the whole cart’ - Winston Churchill

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Contributors
  3. When firms started
  4. Oldest family firms
  5. Oldest newspapers still in circulation
  6. The business press
  7. The world’s biggest firms
  8. America’s biggest firms
  9. America’s biggest bankruptcies
  10. Big firms, Big facts
  11. Big bucks
    1. Profits and losses
  12. Big bail-outs
    1. AIG – not so well covered
    2. Bear Stearns – gripped by a stern bear
    3. Freddie and Fannie get into trouble
    4. Help for airlines post September 11th
    5. Saving the car makers
    6. S&Ls – not thrifty enough
    7. America’s financial rescue package
    8. Britain’s bank rescue package
    9. European financial rescue packages
  13. Behind the corporate name
  14. Business blunders
    1. Amaranth and Mr Hunter
    2. America Online and Time Warner
    3. British Airways
    4. The C5
    5. Carmakers make an unwise flight
    6. Dasani
    7. Decca Records … and another music misjudgment
    8. Ford Edsel
    9. Fat-finger syndrome
    10. Hoover
    11. The Hunt brothers’ silver spree
    12. Louisiana Territory
    13. Manhattan Island
    14. New Coke
    15. Perrier
    16. Persil Power
    17. Ratners
    18. South African gold
    19. Topman
    20. Venice on the cheap
    21. Xerox
    22. Jerry Yang and Yahoo!
    23. The Bible
  15. Board styles
  16. Roles directors play
  17. Games directors play
  18. The world’s most valuable brands
  19. The world’s most admired companies
  20. Britain’s most admired companies
  21. What companies say about themselves
  22. The most effective websites
  23. Business friendliness
  24. Offshore attractions
  25. How competitive?
  26. Easy money?
  27. Business cycles
  28. Business start-ups and failures
  29. Bribery and corruption
  30. Business ratios
    1. Working capital
    2. Sales
    3. Assets
    4. Profits
  31. Entrepreneurial activity
  32. Business costs
  33. The changing workforce
  34. Days lost in strikes and lockouts
  35. Changes in working hours
  36. Biggest business employers
  37. Chief executive pay
  38. Disappearing CEOs
  39. Big payouts to CEOs
  40. Best paid hedge fund managers in the US
  41. International pay comparisons
  42. Leading law firms
  43. Leading accountancy firms
  44. Women in business
    1. Firsts among women
  45. $pending on advertising
  46. Some famous advertising slogans
  47. Some business giants of the past
    1. Carnegie, Andrew (1835–1919)
    2. Disney, Walt Elias (1901–66)
    3. Ford, Henry (1863–1947)
    4. Gibbs, William (1790–1875)
    5. Kroc, Ray (1902–84)
    6. Krupp, Alfred (1812–87)
    7. Lever, William Hesketh (1851–1925)
    8. Morgan, John Pierpoint (1837–1913)
    9. Morita, Akio (1921–99)
    10. Rockefeller, John Davison (1839–1937)
    11. Rothschild, Mayer Amschel (1744–1812)
    12. Walton, Sam (1918–92)
    13. Woolworth, Frank (1852–1919)
  48. The world’s richest people
  49. Europe’s richest people
  50. Philanthropy in America and Britain
  51. Wealth and philanthropy in China
  52. Central bankers since 1900
  53. Quotable quotations
  54. Bad boys
    1. Warren Bennis
  55. Leading management thinkers
    1. Marvin Bower
    2. Jim Collins
    3. W. Edwards Deming
    4. Peter Drucker
    5. Henri Fayol
    6. Gary Hamel
    7. Michael Hammer
    8. Charles Handy
    9. Robert Kaplan
    10. Niccolo Machiavelli
    11. Abraham Maslow
    12. Douglas McGregor
    13. Henry Mintzberg
    14. Kenichi Ohmae
    15. Tom Peters
    16. Michael Porter
    17. Frederick Winslow Taylor
    18. Sun Tzu
  56. Some management styles
  57. The oldest stock exchanges
  58. Leading stockmarkets
  59. Some stockmarket indices explained
    1. Australia All Ordinaries Index
    2. Bombay Stock Exchange Sensex Index
    3. CAC 40 Index
    4. DAX 30 Index
    5. Dow Jones EURO STOXX 50 Index
    6. Dow Jones Industrial Average Index
    7. FTSE Actuaries All-Share Index and FTSE 100 Index
    8. Hang Seng Index
    9. IGBM – Madrid General Index
    10. MSCI Emerging Markets Free Index
    11. NASDAQ 100
    12. Nikkei 225 Index
    13. Shanghai Stock Exchange A-Share Index
    14. Standard & Poor’s 500 Index
    15. S&P/TSX Composite Index
    16. Topix Index
  60. Stockmarket performance
  61. Stockmarkets: the best and worst of times
  62. Stock exchange trading activity
  63. Clocking the stockmarkets
  64. Investment formulas
    1. Black-Scholes model
    2. Capital asset pricing model
    3. Capital fulcrum point
    4. Capital market line
    5. Dividend discount model
    6. Single index model
  65. Private equity
    1. United States
    2. Europe
    3. Britain
  66. Hedge funds
    1. Hedge-fund strategies
  67. Bonds
  68. Bubbles that burst
    1. Tulipmania
    2. The Mississippi Bubble
    3. The South Sea Bubble
    4. Railway mania
    5. The Wall Street crash
    6. Japan’s monetary mistake
    7. The dotcom boom and bust
    8. The credit crunch
  69. Oil reserves and price
  70. Gold reserves and price
  71. Gold facts
  72. Rich producers
  73. Diamond and platinum facts
  74. Behind the currency name
  75. Notes and coins in circulation
  76. Euros printed
  77. The life of $ and £ notes
  78. Exchange rates
  79. Exchange rate pegs
  80. The world economy
  81. Leading traders
  82. How the world economy has changed
  83. Sovereign wealth funds
  84. Foreign direct investment
  85. Sending money home
  86. Interest rates
    1. Short-term rates
    2. Central bank rates
  87. The tax take
  88. Corporate tax rates
  89. How taxing for top earners?
  90. Great business books
  91. Latin that lawyers like to use
  92. What’s in a word
  93. Brand names that entered the language
  94. Business jargon
    1. Advice from The Economist Style Guide
    2. … and on journalese and slang
  95. Six rules of good writing
  96. Alpha e-mail
  97. Business laws and principles
  98. Top business schools
  99. Business school costs and rewards
  100. From PCs to PDAs
  101. Chip power
  102. Computer processing costs
  103. The impact of software piracy
  104. Spam and e-mail
  105. Pod facts
  106. Internet suffixes
  107. Internet usage
  108. Internet growth
  109. Blogs away
  110. Telecommunications
    1. Some first-ever telecommunications messages
  111. The corporate high life
  112. Busiest airports
  113. Pedal power
  114. Ship ahoy
  115. Rail popularity
  116. Business creativity and research
  117. Inventors and inventions
  118. Some notable patents
  119. Business etiquette tips
    1. Business cards
    2. Names and titles and status
    3. Communication, attitudes and greetings
    4. Deadlines and punctuality
    5. No-nos
    6. Eating and drinking
    7. Personal face and space
    8. Sartorial tips
    9. Sports
    10. Yes and no