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The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Consumption and Consumer Studies

Book Description

With entries detailing key concepts, persons, and approaches, The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Consumption and Consumer Studies provides definitive coverage of a field that has grown dramatically in scope and popularity around the world over the last two decades.

  • Includes over 200 A-Z entries varying in length from 500 to 5,000 words, with a list of suggested readings for each entry and cross-references, as well as a lexicon by category, a timeline, and an introduction by the co-editors

  • Brings together the latest research and theories in the field from international contributors across a range of disciplines, from sociology, cultural studies, and advertising to anthropology, business, and consumer behavior

  • Assembles clear and concise expert information for scholars, researchers, and students at all levels

  • Available as an online platform with interactive cross-referencing links and powerful searching and browsing capabilities within the work and across Wiley's comprehensive online reference collection or as a single volume in print

  • Table of Contents

    1. Cover Page
    2. Title Page
    3. Copyright
    4. Contents
    5. Editors
    6. Contributors
    7. Lexicon
    8. Timeline
    9. Introduction
    10. Acknowledgments
    11. Adorno, Theodor
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    12. Advertising
      1. THE HISTORY OF ADVERTISING: FROM SELLING PRODUCTS TO PERSONAS
      2. CONSUMER SOCIETY
      3. THE JOYS OF SHOPPING
      4. THE BRANDED SELF
      5. THE SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES OF ADVERTISING
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
    13. African Americans and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    14. Americanization
      1. GLOBALIZATION AND AMERICANIZATION
      2. HISTORY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN AMERICANIZATION AND CONSUMPTION
      3. REFERENCES
    15. Anti-Consumption Tactics
      1. FURTHER READING
    16. Global Justice Movement
      1. HISTORICAL LINEAGE
      2. CORE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GJM
      3. CHANGES AND FUTURE OF THE GJM
      4. REFERENCE
      5. FURTHER READING
    17. Apple
      1. REFERENCES
    18. Arcades
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    19. Asian Americans and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    20. Authenticity
      1. REFERENCES
    21. B2B Marketing
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    22. Bankruptcy
      1. REFERENCES
    23. Barbie
      1. FURTHER READING
    24. Barthes, Roland
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    25. Baudrillard, Jean
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    26. Beauty Industry
      1. FURTHER READING
    27. Benjamin, Walter
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    28. Big-Box Stores
      1. FURTHER READING
    29. Birmingham School
      1. REFERENCES
    30. Body and Consumer Culture
      1. REFERENCES
    31. Bourdieu, Pierre
      1. REFERENCES
    32. Boycotts
      1. FURTHER READING
    33. Brand Mascots
      1. FURTHER READING
    34. Brand Loyalty
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    35. Brands and Branding
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    36. Bricolage
      1. REFERENCES
    37. Burning Man
      1. FURTHER READING
    38. Capitalism
      1. REFERENCES
    39. Carnivals/Carnivalesque
      1. REFERENCES
    40. Celebrity
      1. REFERENCES
    41. Character Licensing
      1. REFERENCES
    42. Children's Consumer Culture
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    43. Citizenship and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    44. Class
      1. THEORIES OF CLASS
      2. CLASS AND CONSUMPTION
      3. REFERENCES
      4. FURTHER READING
    45. Coca-Colonization
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    46. Commodification
      1. FURTHER READING
    47. Commodities
      1. REFERENCES
    48. Commodity Chains
      1. REFERENCES
    49. Commodity Fetishism
      1. REFERENCES
    50. Commodity Racism
      1. REFERENCES
    51. Conspicuous Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
    52. Consumer Activism
      1. FURTHER READING
    53. Consumer Behavior
      1. CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY
      2. CONSUMER CULTURE THEORY
      3. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR AS STUDIED IN OTHER DISCIPLINES
      4. REFERENCES
      5. FURTHER READING
    54. Consumer Culture Theory (CCT)
      1. AXIOLOGY
      2. HISTORY
      3. THE BIRTH OF THE CCT CONCEPT AND ITS RESEARCH DOMAINS
      4. CRITIQUE
      5. REFERENCES
    55. Consumer Culture, History of
      1. THE BIRTH OF CONSUMER CULTURE: RENAISSANCE, ROYAL COURTS, AND BOURGEOIS CLASSES
      2. COLONIAL COMMERCE, SOCIAL COMPETITION, AND HEDONISM
      3. CITIES, DEPARTMENT STORES, AND ADVERTISING
      4. FROM THE “CONSUMER SOCIETY” TO THE AGE OF THE INTERNET
      5. REFERENCES
    56. Consumer Movements, History of
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    57. Consumer Protection Agency
      1. FURTHER READING
    58. Consumer Resistance Movements
      1. REFERENCES
    59. Consumer Socialization
      1. REFERENCES
    60. Consumer Society
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    61. Consumption in Africa
      1. REFERENCES
    62. Consumption in China
      1. FAST-GROWING CHINESE MIDDLE CLASS WITH LIMITED BUYING POWER
      2. SOCIAL INEQUALITIES AND LUXURY CONSUMER GOODS
      3. CONSUMPTION IN THE PROCESS OF DIVERSIFICATION
      4. CONCLUSION
      5. REFERENCES
      6. FURTHER READING
    63. Consumption in India
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    64. Consumption in Japan
      1. FURTHER READING
    65. Consumption in the Middle East/Arab World
      1. COLONIAL CONSUMPTION
      2. POSTCOLONIAL AND NATIONALIST CONSUMPTION
      3. GLOBAL AND MULTILOCAL
      4. FURTHER READING
    66. Consumption in Postcommunist Countries
      1. COMMUNIST CONSUMPTION
      2. NOSTALGIC AND NATIONALIST CONSUMPTION
      3. DIVERGING CONSUMPTION AFTER COMMUNISM
      4. SHIFTS IN GLOBAL CONSUMPTION
      5. REFERENCES
    67. Consumption in the United States
      1. FURTHER READING
    68. Consumption Rituals
      1. REFERENCES
    69. Consumption and Identity
      1. REFERENCES
    70. Consumption and Sport
      1. REFERENCES
    71. Cool
      1. REFERENCES
    72. Coolhunting
      1. REFERENCES
    73. Cooperatives
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    74. Cosmetic Surgery
      1. FURTHER READING
    75. Counterfeiting/Piracy
      1. REFERENCES
    76. Credit Cards
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    77. Cultural Capital
      1. REFERENCES
    78. Cultural Intermediaries
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    79. Cultural Omnivores
      1. REFERENCES
    80. Cultural Studies
      1. FURTHER READING
    81. Culture Industries
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    82. Culture Jamming
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    83. Culture-Ideology of Consumerism
      1. REFERENCES
    84. Dandyism
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    85. de Certeau, Michel
      1. REFERENCES
    86. Debord, Guy
      1. REFERENCES
    87. Debt
      1. REFERENCES
    88. Department Stores
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    89. Diderot Effect
      1. REFERENCES
    90. Disneyization
      1. REFERENCE
    91. Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
      1. REFERENCES
    92. Downshifting
      1. REFERENCES
    93. Markets, Moral Aspects of
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    94. Ecotourism
      1. REFERENCES
    95. Education and Consumption
      1. FOOD AND HEALTHY LIFESTYLES
      2. CULTURE AND THE ARTS
      3. ETHICAL AND POLITICAL CONSUMPTION
      4. REFERENCES
    96. Edutainment
      1. FURTHER READING
    97. Elias, Norbert
      1. REFERENCES
    98. Emotions and Consumption
      1. EMOTION AS AN INDEPENDENT CATEGORY OF CONSUMPTION
      2. THE CREATION OF THE CONSUMER AS AN EMOTIONAL AGENT
      3. EMOTION AND THE SEMIOTICS OF CONSUMPTION
      4. EMOTIONS AS COMMODITIES
      5. REFERENCES
    99. Green Consumerism
      1. KEY DEBATES
      2. ECOLOGICAL MODERNIZATION THEORY
      3. CONSUMPTION AND DEMODERNIZATION
      4. A MIDDLE POSITION ON CONSUMPTION
      5. REFERENCES
    100. Ethical Consumption
      1. TYPES OF ETHICAL CONSUMPTION
      2. HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENTS
      3. KEY RESEARCH AREAS
      4. CRITICAL REMARKS
      5. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      6. REFERENCES
    101. Experiential Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    102. Facebook
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    103. Fair Trade
      1. REFERENCES
    104. Farmers' Markets
      1. REFERENCES
    105. Fashion
      1. REFERENCES
    106. Fast Food
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    107. Femininities
      1. REFERENCES
    108. Finance/Financial Markets
      1. REFERENCES
    109. Flâneur/Flânerie
      1. REFERENCES
    110. Flea Markets
      1. REFERENCES
    111. Food
      1. INTRODUCING THE SOCIAL APPETITE
      2. FOOD AND IDENTITY
      3. ETHICAL CONSUMPTION AND ALTERNATIVE FOOD MOVEMENTS
      4. THE RISE OF FOOD STUDIES
      5. REFERENCES
    112. Food Deserts
      1. REFERENCES
    113. Fordism/Post-Fordism
      1. REFERENCES
    114. Franchising
      1. FURTHER READING
    115. Frankfurt School
      1. THE CULTURE INDUSTRIES
      2. CONSUMERISM
      3. CONCLUSION
      4. REFERENCES
      5. FURTHER READING
    116. Free Trade Zones/Export Processing Zones
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    117. Gay and Lesbian/Queer Markets/Marketing
      1. REFERENCES
    118. Gender and Consumer Culture
      1. REFERENCES
    119. Generation Y
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    120. Gentrification
      1. NECESSARY CONDITIONS AND PROCESS
      2. GENTRIFICATION DEBATES
      3. GENTRIFICATION AS CONSUMPTION
      4. REFERENCES
      5. FURTHER READING
    121. Consumption, Landscapes of
      1. REFERENCES
    122. Gifts
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    123. Girl Culture
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    124. Global Markets
      1. REFERENCES
    125. Globalization and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
    126. Glocalization/Grobalization
      1. REFERENCES
    127. Governmentality and Consumer Culture
      1. CONSUMPTION AS PRODUCTION
      2. CONSUMPTION AS RESPONSIBILITY
      3. CONSUMPTION AS SECURITY
      4. REFERENCES
    128. Green Consumption
      1. WHO ARE THE GREEN CONSUMERS?
      2. GREEN CONSUMPTION AND GREEN MARKETING
      3. MODELS OF GREEN CONSUMPTION
      4. REFERENCES
    129. Hollywood
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    130. Homogenization and Heterogenization
      1. REFERENCES
    131. Housing/Housing Markets
      1. REFERENCES
    132. Hyperconsumption
      1. REFERENCES
    133. Infomercial
      1. REFERENCES
    134. Economy, Informal
      1. ALTERNATIVE VIEWS
      2. STRUCTURAL ARTICULATION: INFORMALITY AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE SYSTEM
      3. MERCANTILISM: INFORMALITY AS A RESULT OF STATE COERCION
      4. REFERENCES
    135. Infotainment
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    136. Intellectual Property
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    137. Internet, The, and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    138. Just-in-Time Production
      1. REFERENCES
    139. Las Vegas
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    140. Latinos and Consumption
      1. FURTHER READING
    141. Leisure and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    142. Lifestyle
      1. REFERENCES
    143. Marketing/Marketing Science
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    144. Marx, Karl
      1. “RICARDO TURNED SOCIALIST, HEGEL BECOME ECONOMIST”
      2. THE MANIFESTO AND MODERNITY
      3. FROM “MARXISM” TO THE MEGA AND DIFFERENT “MARXES”
      4. REFERENCES
    145. Masculinity
      1. HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY
      2. “DOING” MASCULINITY
      3. MASCULINITY AND CONSUMPTION
      4. MASCULINITY AS CONSUMABLE PRODUCT
      5. SEX AS COMMODITY
      6. REFERENCES
      7. FURTHER READING
    146. Mass Culture
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    147. Mass Media
      1. HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE AND EARLY RESEARCH
      2. MAJOR TRENDS IN MASS MEDIA RESEARCH
      3. FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN RESEARCH AND THEORY
      4. REFERENCES
      5. FURTHER READING
    148. Material Culture Studies
      1. REFERENCES
    149. McDonaldization
      1. REFERENCES
    150. Medical Tourism
      1. REFERENCES
    151. Merchandising
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    152. Methods of Consumer Research
      1. 6S MODEL OF METHODS IN CONSUMER STUDIES
      2. QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES
      3. DOMAINS OF STUDY AND CONSUMER RESEARCH
      4. INTERDISCIPLINARY METHODS IN CUSTOMER RESEARCH
      5. PERSPECTIVES FOR THE FUTURE: NEUROSCIENCE AND CONSUMER RESEARCH
      6. REFERENCES
      7. FURTHER READING
    153. Metrosexual
      1. FURTHER READING
    154. Modernization Theory
      1. FURTHER READING
    155. Money
      1. REFERENCES
    156. Mothers/Motherhood
      1. REFERENCES
    157. Music and Consumer Experience
      1. FURTHER READING
    158. Narcissism
      1. REFERENCES
    159. Needs and Wants
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    160. Needs, True and False
      1. REFERENCES
    161. Niche Marketing
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    162. Nike
      1. REFERENCES
    163. Obesity
      1. FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO OBESITY
      2. CONSEQUENCES OF OBESITY
      3. OBESITY AND CONSUMER CULTURE
      4. REFERENCES
      5. FURTHER READING
    164. Nostalgia
      1. REFERENCES
    165. Obsolescence: Planned, Progressive, Stylistic
      1. REFERENCES
    166. Open Source and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    167. Outsourcing
      1. REFERENCES
    168. Peer-to-Peer File Sharing
      1. REFERENCES
    169. Pets
      1. REFERENCES
    170. Politics and Consumer Culture
      1. REFERENCES
    171. Popular Culture
      1. REFERENCES
    172. Privacy
      1. REFERENCES
    173. Prosumption
      1. REFERENCES
    174. Public Relations
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    175. Recycling
      1. THE IMPACT OF RECYCLING
      2. THE PREVALENCE OF RECYCLING IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES
      3. DETERMINANTS OF RECYCLING
      4. REFERENCES
    176. Decluttering
      1. REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING
    177. Scarcity and Artificial Scarcity
      1. REFERENCES
    178. Semiotics
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    179. Service Economy
      1. THE QUALITY OF JOBS IN THE SERVICE ECONOMY
      2. ARE SERVICES DIFFERENT?
      3. CONSUMPTION NOT PRODUCTION AS THE DEFINING FEATURE OF THE SERVICE ECONOMY?
      4. REFERENCES
    180. Servicescapes
      1. REFERENCES
    181. Shopping
      1. NEEDS AND WANTS
      2. HIDDEN INJURIES OF GENDER
      3. SHOPPING PLACES
      4. REFERENCES
    182. Shopping Malls
      1. THE RISE OF THE MALL
      2. SHOPPING MALL SELFHOOD
      3. THE SOCIOLOGY OF THE MALL
      4. SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH OF MALLS
      5. THE DIALECTIC OF MALLDOM
      6. THE FUTURE OF MALLS
      7. REFERENCES
    183. Simulations
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    184. Slow Food Movement
      1. REFERENCES
    185. Social Media
      1. DEFINITIONS
      2. CLASSIFICATION OF SOCIAL MEDIA
      3. HISTORY OF SOCIAL MEDIA
      4. MOBILE SOCIAL MEDIA
      5. REFERENCES
    186. Socially Responsible Marketing (SRM)
      1. GREENWASHING (SOCIALLY IRRESPONSIBLE MARKETING)
      2. FURTHER READING
    187. Consumption, Spectacles of
      1. REFERENCES
    188. Starbuckization
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    189. Stealth Marketing
      1. FURTHER READING
    190. Supermarkets
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    191. Sustainable Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    192. Sweatshops
      1. REFERENCES
    193. Symbolic Exchange
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    194. Symbolic Value
      1. REFERENCES
    195. Taxes
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    196. Teens
      1. FURTHER READING
    197. Theming
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    198. Tourism
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    199. Tweens
      1. REFERENCES
    200. Veblen, Thorstein
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    201. Cities, Visual Consumption of
      1. REFERENCES
    202. Wal-Mart
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    203. Warhol, Andy
      1. REFERENCES
    204. Waste
      1. REFERENCES
    205. Weddings
      1. REFERENCES
    206. Whole Foods Market
      1. REFERENCES
    207. Williams, Raymond
      1. POPULAR CULTURE
      2. REFERENCES
      3. FURTHER READING
    208. World's Fairs and International Expositions
      1. FURTHER READING
    209. Youth culture(s)
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    210. YouTube
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    211. eBay
      1. FURTHER READING
    212. Consumer Culture
      1. FEATURES OF CONSUMER CULTURE
      2. CONSUMER CULTURE AS MORAL/POLITICAL JUDGMENT
      3. POSTCONSUMER CULTURE?
      4. REFERENCES
      5. FURTHER READING
    213. Consumer Cosmopolitanism
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    214. Consumers, Flawed
      1. REFERENCES
    215. Consumer Movements, Contemporary
      1. 1920S–1930S: CR, CU, PRODUCT TESTING, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION
      2. 1960S–1970S: NADER, CORPORATE ACCOUNTABILITY, AND CONSUMER PROTECTION
      3. 1990S–TODAY: SHOPPING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
      4. REFERENCES
    216. Consumers, Failed
      1. FURTHER READING
    217. Consumption, Postmodern
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    218. Sexualities and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
    219. Visual Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
    220. Marketplace Trust
      1. REFERENCES
    221. Behavioral Economics and Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
    222. Quality of Life, Measurements of
      1. GDP AND NATIONAL INCOME: WHAT THEY MEASURE
      2. THE NEOCLASSICAL MODEL
      3. INSTITUTIONAL MODELS
      4. BUDDHIST ECONOMICS FRAMEWORK
      5. REFERENCES
    223. Locavorism
      1. REFERENCE
      2. FURTHER READING
    224. Consumers in Emerging Economies
      1. INDIAN CONSUMER CATEGORIES
      2. BOTTOM-OF-PYRAMID CONSUMERS
      3. REFERENCES
    225. Death and Consumption
      1. FURTHER READING
    226. Christmas
      1. REFERENCES
      2. FURTHER READING
    227. Failing Consumption
      1. REFERENCES
    228. Digital-Mobile Consumption and Marketing
      1. FURTHER READING
    229. Mass Marketing
      1. REFERENCES
    230. Occupy Movement
      1. WHAT IS THE OCCUPY MOVEMENT?
      2. WHAT INSPIRED THEM?
      3. WHAT TACTICS DO THEY USE?
      4. WHO ARE THEY?
      5. WHY DO THEY PROTEST?
      6. WILL OCCUPY HAVE ANY EFFECT?
      7. REFERENCES
      8. FURTHER READING