You are previewing The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems Volume 1: IBM z/VM 6.3.
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The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems Volume 1: IBM z/VM 6.3

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication is the first volume of a series of three books called The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems. The other two volumes relate to Red Hat and SUSE:

  • The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems Volume 2: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 7.1, SG24-8303

  • The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems Volume 3: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, SG24-8890


  • It is recommended that you start with Volume 1 of this series because IBM z/VM® is the base “layer” when you install Linux on z Systems. Volume 1 starts with an introduction, discusses planning, then describes z/VM installation into a two-node single system image (SSI) cluster, configuration, hardening, automation, and servicing. It adopts a cookbook format that provides a concise, repeatable set of procedures for installing and configuring z/VM by using the z/VM SSI clustering feature.

    Volume 1 consists of the following chapters:

  • Chapter 1, “Introduction to Linux on the IBM mainframe under z/VM” on page 3. This chapter provides a concise introduction to the concept of using the z/VM platform as an enterprise Linux infrastructure on the IBM mainframe.

  • Chapter 2, “Planning” on page 15. This chapter covers the planning of hardware, software, and networking resources that you need to do before you attempt to install z/VM and Linux.

  • Chapter 3, “Configuring a workstation for mainframe access” on page 39. This chapter addresses the configuration of a workstation that is running either Linux or Windows to access the mainframe.

  • Chapter 4, “Installing and configuring z/VM” on page 49. This chapter describes installing z/VM 6.3 as a two-node VM Single System Image feature (VMSSI) cluster, performing the initial configuration, hardening, and enabling basic system automation.

  • Chapter 5, “Servicing z/VM” on page 153. This chapter focuses on the requirements to keep your z/VM systems updated to ensure full functionality, optimal utility, security, and the elimination of known problems. The process of ordering and applying z/VM Service is described. Programming Temporary Fixes (PTFs) and Recommended Service Upgrades (RSUs) are both covered.

  • Chapter 6, “Planning and preparing for Linux workloads” on page 171. This chapter describes the necessary steps to begin your first Linux installation. It describes common tasks that are executed during administration, maintenance, and expansion to accommodate additional workloads.


  • Volumes 2 and 3 describe how to Linux virtual servers on IBM z Systems™ hardware under IBM z/VM. The cookbook format continues with installing and customizing Linux.

    For Volume 1, you need at least two IBM z Systems logical partitions (LPARs) with associated resources and z/VM 6.3 installation media. For Volumes 2 and 3, you will need either the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (RHEL) version 7.1 or the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) version 12 distribution (or both).

    This book series assumes that you are generally familiar with z Systems technology and terminology. It does not assume an in-depth understanding of z/VM or Linux. It is written for those individuals who want to start quickly with z/VM and Linux on the mainframe, and get virtual servers up and running in a short time (days, not weeks or months).

    Table of Contents

    1. Front cover
    2. Notices
      1. Trademarks
    3. IBM Redbooks promotions
    4. Preface
      1. Volumes in this series
      2. Conventions
      3. Operating system releases that are used
      4. Authors
      5. Special thanks
      6. Now you can become a published author, too!
      7. Comments welcome
      8. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
    5. Summary of changes
      1. Summary of changes in this book
    6. Innovation Data Processing
    7. Part 1 Using IBM z/VM 6.3
    8. Chapter 1. Introduction to Linux on the IBM mainframe under z/VM
      1. 1.1 What is virtualization?
      2. 1.2 Why the mainframe, and why z/VM?
      3. 1.3 The philosophy that was adopted in authoring this book
      4. 1.4 A high-level overview of components and terminology
      5. 1.5 z/VM components, capabilities, and enhancements
      6. 1.6 Choices and decisions for this book
      7. 1.7 Single system image design
      8. 1.8 Infrastructure design
      9. 1.9 Usability tests that are performed
      10. 1.10 Understanding LOGOFF versus DISCONNECT
      11. 1.11 Summary of Linux and z/VM similarities
    9. Chapter 2. Planning
      1. 2.1 Planning for VMSSI with LGR
        1. 2.1.1 Hints and tips
        2. 2.1.2 The need for ECKD DASD
      2. 2.2 Bill of materials
        1. 2.2.1 Hardware resources
        2. 2.2.2 Software resources
        3. 2.2.3 Networking resources
      3. 2.3 z/VM standardized conventions
        1. 2.3.1 DASD volume labeling convention
        2. 2.3.2 Backup file naming convention
        3. 2.3.3 Command retrieve convention
      4. 2.4 Disk planning
      5. 2.5 HiperDispatch planning
      6. 2.6 Storage (memory) planning
        1. 2.6.1 Considerations for z/VM 6.3 initial installation and migrations
        2. 2.6.2 Storage allocation
        3. 2.6.3 Global aging list
      7. 2.7 Paging planning
        1. 2.7.1 Recommendations, tips, and hints
        2. 2.7.2 Calculating paging space
      8. 2.8 Password planning
      9. 2.9 Network planning
      10. 2.10 Channel-to-channel adapter planning
      11. 2.11 Architectural overview of the environment that is used in this book
      12. 2.12 Planning worksheet
        1. 2.12.1 IBM Shopz
        2. 2.12.2 Hardware Management Console
        3. 2.12.3 z/VM Installation Planning Panels (INSTPLAN)
        4. 2.12.4 z/VM networking resources
        5. 2.12.5 z/VM DASD
        6. 2.12.6 FCP devices
        7. 2.12.7 Linux resources
        8. 2.12.8 Host names and IP addresses
    10. Chapter 3. Configuring a workstation for mainframe access
      1. 3.1 PuTTY: A no-charge SSH client for Microsoft Windows
      2. 3.2 Set up a VNC client
      3. 3.3 3270 emulators
      4. 3.4 Linux desktops
    11. Chapter 4. Installing and configuring z/VM
      1. 4.1 Obtaining z/VM through electronic download
      2. 4.2 Configuring an FTP server for z/VM installation
        1. 4.2.1 Create directories on the FTP server and upload the installation image
      3. 4.3 Installing z/VM from a DVD or an FTP server
        1. 4.3.1 Start the z/VM installation
        2. 4.3.2 Copy a plain z/VM system to DASD
        3. 4.3.3 IPL the first SSI member
        4. 4.3.4 IPL for the remaining SSI members
        5. 4.3.5 Initialize the allocated DASD for z/VM Service data
        6. 4.3.6 Service-level validation and subscribing to service notifications
      4. 4.4 Configuring the XEDIT PROFILE
      5. 4.5 Editing the z/VM SYSTEM CONFIG file
        1. 4.5.1 Modify features and optimize parameter settings
        2. 4.5.2 Enable and configure virtual networking components
        3. 4.5.3 Use CPSYNTAX to validate the modified system configuration file
      6. 4.6 Initial TCP/IP configuration
        1. 4.6.1 Using the z/VM IPWIZARD tool
        2. 4.6.2 Configure TCPIP to automatically start during the system IPL
        3. 4.6.3 Copy the utilities and REXX EXECs to the cluster-wide Shared File System (SFS) pool
      7. 4.7 Adding additional page volumes and perm (user) volumes
        1. 4.7.1 Format volumes for page space
        2. 4.7.2 Use the CPFORMAT EXEC
        3. 4.7.3 Format DASD for minidisks
        4. 4.7.4 Update the SYSTEM CONFIG file
        5. 4.7.5 Attach minidisk volumes to the system for use
      8. 4.8 Enabling the IBM Directory Maintenance Facility (DirMaint)
        1. 4.8.1 Enable DirMaint
        2. 4.8.2 Change default passwords
        3. 4.8.3 Customize the EXTENT CONTROL file
        4. 4.8.4 Start DirMaint
        5. 4.8.5 Validation of DirMaint
      9. 4.9 Implementing additional network features
        1. 4.9.1 Enable z/VM FTP and Network File System functionality
        2. 4.9.2 Reconfigure TCP/IP for high availability by using a VSWITCH
      10. 4.10 Shut down and IPL the SSI cluster again
        1. 4.10.1 IPL the other SSI members
      11. 4.11 Validating and testing your changes
      12. 4.12 Enabling basic system automation
        1. 4.12.1 Configure AUTOLOG1’s PROFILE EXEC
        2. 4.12.2 Configuring and enabling the programmable operator facility (PROP)
        3. 4.12.3 z/VM User Directory PROFILEs
        4. 4.12.4 Creation and use of z/VM User Directory prototypes (PROTODIRs)
        5. 4.12.5 Create a time-based virtual service machine named CRONSVM
        6. 4.12.6 Create VMLOGS
        7. 4.12.7 Shut down and IPL the SSI cluster again
      13. 4.13 z/VM security and hardening
        1. 4.13.1 Use an External Security Manager for correct resource security
        2. 4.13.2 Using LOGONBY for correct accountability
        3. 4.13.3 Encrypting communications to and from z/VM
        4. 4.13.4 High-level z/VM security
        5. 4.13.5 Linux virtual machine privilege classes
      14. 4.14 Back up and restore your z/VM system
      15. 4.15 Create an SFS file pool for Linux virtual machines
        1. 4.15.1 Characteristics of SFS file pools
        2. 4.15.2 Add a directory entry for the new SFS server machine
        3. 4.15.3 Generate the SFS file pool for Linux guest systems
        4. 4.15.4 Add a directory entry for the SFS administration machine
        5. 4.15.5 Enroll the Linux virtual machines as USERS
        6. 4.15.6 Add Linux parm files and REXX EXECs to the LNX file pool
      16. 4.16 Creating identity LNXADMIN for Linux administration
      17. 4.17 Monitoring file pool utilization
    12. Chapter 5. Servicing z/VM
      1. 5.1 Typical release schedule
      2. 5.2 Recommended service upgrades (RSUs)
      3. 5.3 How to apply a recommended service upgrade
        1. 5.3.1 Get service from the Internet
        2. 5.3.2 Download the service files
        3. 5.3.3 Receive, apply, and build the service
        4. 5.3.4 Put the service into production
      4. 5.4 How to apply a program temporary fix
        1. 5.4.1 Get service by using Shopz
        2. 5.4.2 Determine whether a PTF was applied
        3. 5.4.3 Download the service to z/VM
        4. 5.4.4 Receive, apply, and build the service
        5. 5.4.5 Put the service into production
        6. 5.4.6 Check for APARMEMO files
      5. 5.5 How to determine the service level of TCP/IP
      6. 5.6 Moving on to Linux
    13. Chapter 6. Planning and preparing for Linux workloads
      1. 6.1 Planning a Linux virtual machine
      2. 6.2 Considerations for disk storage types
        1. 6.2.1 Direct-attached storage devices (DASD)
        2. 6.2.2 Direct-attached Fibre Channel
        3. 6.2.3 Emulated DASD
        4. 6.2.4 Minidisks
        5. 6.2.5 HyperPAV
      3. 6.3 Network attachment options and considerations
        1. 6.3.1 VSWITCH interfaces
        2. 6.3.2 Direct-attached Open Systems Adapter
        3. 6.3.3 IBM HiperSockets (HIPERS)
      4. 6.4 Common DirMaint tasks
        1. 6.4.1 Characteristics of DirMaint and the user directory
        2. 6.4.2 Checking the status of DirMaint and subcomponents
        3. 6.4.3 Add a USER to z/VM by using a prototype
        4. 6.4.4 Add a USER to z/VM without the use of a prototype
        5. 6.4.5 Add an IDENTITY to z/VM by using a prototype
        6. 6.4.6 Add an IDENTITY to z/VM without using prototypes
        7. 6.4.7 Change the amount of memory that is assigned to a user
        8. 6.4.8 Modify a user
        9. 6.4.9 Delete a user
        10. 6.4.10 Add a minidisk to a user or identity
        11. 6.4.11 Get a copy of the user directory
        12. 6.4.12 Get and update the EXTENT CONTROL file
        13. 6.4.13 Clean up the work units
        14. 6.4.14 Check the disk map
        15. 6.4.15 Dedicate crypto domains
    14. Part 2 Other topics
    15. Chapter 7. z/VM live guest relocation
      1. 7.1 LGR considerations
        1. 7.1.1 General considerations before relocation
        2. 7.1.2 Mandatory memory checking that is performed during relocation
        3. 7.1.3 Optional memory checking that is performed during relocation
        4. 7.1.4 Minimizing link and resource contention
      2. 7.2 Relocate a Linux system
    16. Chapter 8. z/VM Systems Management API (SMAPI) and Resource Access Control Facility for z/VM (RACF/VM)
      1. 8.1 Configure DirMaint
        1. 8.1.1 Set up basic SMAPI configuration
        2. 8.1.2 Disable support for ensembles
        3. 8.1.3 Start SMAPI at IPL time
        4. 8.1.4 Test SMAPI from the Conversational Monitor System (CMS)
        5. 8.1.5 Test SMAPI from Linux by using smaclient
      2. 8.2 Enable and configure RACF
        1. 8.2.1 Create the RACF command file
        2. 8.2.2 Customize SMF
        3. 8.2.3 Delete the ICHRCX02 exit
        4. 8.2.4 Copy the RACF databases
        5. 8.2.5 Set up the AUTOLOG1 and AUTOLOG2 virtual machines
        6. 8.2.6 Enable RACF
        7. 8.2.7 Put RACF into production on all members
        8. 8.2.8 Configure SMAPI to work with RACF
      3. 8.3 Verify that DirMaint and RACF work together
        1. 8.3.1 Configure LogonBy processing
        2. 8.3.2 Use the RACF SMF data unload utility
    17. Chapter 9. Monitoring z/VM and Linux
      1. 9.1 Use basic z/VM commands
        1. 9.1.1 Use the INDICATE command
        2. 9.1.2 Use other basic commands
      2. 9.2 z/VM Performance Toolkit
        1. 9.2.1 Configure the IBM Performance Toolkit for VM
        2. 9.2.2 Configure web browser support
        3. 9.2.3 Configure PERFSVM
        4. 9.2.4 Start the IBM Performance Toolkit for VM
        5. 9.2.5 Use the IBM Performance Toolkit for VM
      3. 9.3 Collect and use raw CP monitor data
        1. 9.3.1 Collect CP monitor data
        2. 9.3.2 Use CP monitor data
      4. 9.4 Monitor Linux performance for troubleshooting
        1. 9.4.1 Monitor Linux performance from z/VM
        2. 9.4.2 Monitor Linux performance from inside Linux
    18. Chapter 10. Working with disks
      1. 10.1 Add disk space to virtual machines
        1. 10.1.1 Make new minidisks or count key data DASD available in Linux
        2. 10.1.2 Make new emulated DASD (EDEV) available in Linux
        3. 10.1.3 Make new zFCP LUN available in Linux
      2. 10.2 Add a logical volume
        1. 10.2.1 Create a logical volume and file system
        2. 10.2.2 Update the file system table
      3. 10.3 Extend an existing logical volume
      4. 10.4 Moving a physical volume
    19. Chapter 11. Working with networks
      1. 11.1 Adding CTCAs to an SSI cluster
        1. 11.1.1 Add the CTC devices dynamically
        2. 11.1.2 Add the CTC devices permanently
      2. 11.2 Setting up a private interconnect
      3. 11.3 Creating a HiperSockets device between logical partitions
        1. 11.3.1 Verify HiperSockets hardware definitions
        2. 11.3.2 Create a TCP/IP stack on z/OS
        3. 11.3.3 Configure the HiperSockets interface on Linux
        4. 11.3.4 Verify connectivity
      4. 11.4 Configuring a port group with Link Aggregation Control Protocol
    20. Chapter 12. Miscellaneous helpful information
      1. 12.1 Install a package from the IBM VM Download Library
        1. 12.1.1 Use the CMS web browser
      2. 12.2 Manually formatting DASD for use
    21. Part 3 Appendixes
    22. Appendix A. References, cheat sheets, and blank worksheets
      1. Related books
      2. Online resources
      3. Important z/VM files
      4. Cheat sheets
      5. Blank planning worksheet
    23. Appendix B. Additional material
      1. Locating the web material
      2. Using the web material
      3. z/VM REXX EXECs and XEDIT macros
      4. Sample files
      5. Linux code
    24. Related publications
      1. IBM Redbooks
      2. Other publications
      3. Online resources
      4. Help from IBM
    25. Back cover