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The Product Manager's Desk Reference

Book Description

Whether a business sells tangible goods or services, product management holds a critical position in the organization's pursuit of profits. Because traditional departmental roles continually evolve, and because the business climate is so competitive, the job of product manager has become exceedingly critical—yet it remainsvery complex. The Product Manager's Desk Reference is the first book to lay down a comprehensive body of knowledge for thiscritical function, and it is the only book that can effectively guide product managers so that they can establish and build a successfulcareer in product management.

Here, product management expert and practitioner Steven Haines clearly illustrates the entire product life cycle, from beginning to end. This outstanding work is packed with an array of best practices and helpful hints which are critical to the efficient management of products.

The Product Manager's Desk Reference is punctuated with useful diagrams, tables,and templates and will help you:

  • Create a master plan of record for your product
  • Formulate actionable strategies
  • Incorporate market data into important decisions
  • Set the stage for creating innovative products
  • Optimize existing products and product portfolios
  • Apply financial techniques to manage product profitability

The Product Manager's Desk Reference embodieseverything “Product Management.” It is a comprehensive, versatile, must-have resource for anyone who works in any company, in any industry, who seeks to successfully and profitably market and manage products and services.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. The Product Manager's Desk Reference
  3. Copyright Page
  4. CONTENTS
  5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  6. INTRODUCTION: THE ACCIDENTAL PROFESSION
    1. EVERYONE COMES FROM SOMEWHERE ELSE
    2. A GRAY'S ANATOMY OF BUSINESS
    3. HOW YOU SHOULD USE THIS BOOK
    4. DRAWN FROM EXTENSIVE BENCHMARKING AND EXPERIENCE
      1. The Product Management Anatomy
      2. A Career in Progress
    5. SEPARATING THE BEST FROM THE REST
    6. SAFE JOURNEYS
  7. MODULE 1 FOUNDATIONAL ELEMENTS FOR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT
    1. INTRODUCTION TO MODULE 1
    2. CHAPTER 1 WHAT IS PRODUCT MANAGEMENT?
      1. QUESTION 1: WHAT IS A PRODUCT?
        1. Product Lines
        2. Product Portfolios
        3. Solutions and Bundles
        4. Product Elements and Modules
        5. Platforms
      2. QUESTION 2: WHAT IS MANAGEMENT?
        1. What Does a Product Manager Really Do?
      3. QUESTION 3: WHAT IS PRODUCT MANAGEMENT?
      4. QUESTION 4: HOW DOES PRODUCT MANAGEMENT TRANSFORM A PRODUCT?
        1. New Product Planning Phases
        2. New Product Introduction Phases (Execution)
        3. Post-Launch Product Management
        4. Product Management: A Holistic Activity
      5. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    3. CHAPTER 2 THE PRODUCT MASTER PLAN
      1. THE PURPOSE OF A MASTER PLAN
        1. Plans Change
      2. THE FORMAT OF THE PRODUCT MASTER PLAN
      3. THE VALUE OF A PRODUCT MASTER PLAN
      4. AN INSURANCE POLICY FOR CONSISTENT COMMUNICATION
      5. THE BASIC CONSTRUCTION OF THE PRODUCT MASTER PLAN
      6. MAJOR DOCUMENTS INCLUDED IN THE PRODUCT MASTER PLAN
        1. A Personal Library
      7. SUMMARY
      8. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    4. CHAPTER 3 LEADERSHIP: CREATING INFLUENCE
      1. YOU ARE ALWAYS ON STAGE
      2. STAY CALM, EVEN WHEN YOUR HAIR'S ON FIRE
      3. TRANSFORMATION
        1. The Most Important Values
      4. LEADERSHIP BEHAVIORS AND MINDSET
      5. ADDITIONAL SKILLS AND SUBJECT MATTER EXPERTISE
      6. EXPERIENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
      7. HOW DO YOU IMPROVE YOUR SKILLS AND EXPERIENCES?
      8. SUMMARY
      9. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    5. CHAPTER 4 CROSS-FUNCTIONAL PRODUCT TEAMS: GETTING THINGS DONE
      1. CROSS-FUNCTIONAL TEAM DEFINITIONS
      2. DEFINITION: A CULTURE OF DISCIPLINE
      3. TEAM MEMBERSHIP
        1. Teaming Is Not Always Easy
      4. CURING THE DYSFUNCTIONAL TEAM
      5. BUILDING BLOCKS OF A CROSS-FUNCTIONAL PRODUCT TEAM
      6. PRODUCT TEAM RESPONSIBILITIES
      7. FORMS OF CROSS-FUNCTIONAL PRODUCT TEAM MEMBERSHIP
      8. CLARIFYING ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
      9. THE FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      10. TEAM MEMBERSHIP ACROSS THE LIFE CYCLE
      11. CROSS-FUNCTIONAL TEAM LEADERSHIP
      12. SUMMARY
      13. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    6. CHAPTER 5 DECISION MAKING: WHAT'S NEXT?
      1. THE IMPORTANCE OF DECISION MAKING
      2. DECISION MAKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING
      3. SAVING GRACE: A CASE STUDY ABOUT DECISION MAKING
      4. DECISION-MAKING TECHNIQUES
        1. Combining Options
        2. The Morphological Box
        3. The Decision Matrix
        4. The Decision Tree
      5. ANALYSIS PARALYSIS AND RATIONAL IGNORANCE
      6. GUT-FEEL DECISION MAKING
      7. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE
      8. SUMMARY
      9. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    7. CHAPTER 6 FINANCE FOR THE PRODUCT MANAGER: KEEPING SCORE
      1. THE LANGUAGE OF BUSINESS
      2. THE BASIC FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
      3. THE INCOME STATEMENT
      4. THE BALANCE SHEET
      5. CASH FLOW
      6. DEMYSTIFYING DISCOUNTED CASH FLOW
      7. FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR PRODUCT MANAGERS
        1. Creating Business Cases for Product Investments
        2. Assembling Forecasts
        3. Testing Planning Assumptions Using Sensitivity Analysis
        4. Deriving Product Cost Models
        5. Establishing Pricing Models
        6. Preparing Product Budgets
      8. MANAGING THE BUSINESS
        1. Making Sure the Product Is Achieving Its Financial Goals
        2. Financial Ratios
        3. Last Words on Ratios
        4. Maturity Assessment: Placing the Product on the Life Cycle Curve
        5. Using Scorecards
      9. SUMMARY
      10. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
  8. MODULE 2 MAKING THE MARKET YOUR PRIMARY FOCUS
    1. INTRODUCTION TO MODULE 2
    2. CHAPTER 7 THE PLAYING FIELD AND THE PLAYERS: ANALYZING THE INDUSTRY AND COMPETITION
      1. BECOMING THE EXPERT
      2. WHAT IS AN INDUSTRY?
      3. INDUSTRY CLASSIFICATIONS
      4. PUTTING INDUSTRY EVOLUTION INTO PERSPECTIVE
      5. CARRYING OUT INDUSTRY RESEARCH
      6. SECURING ADDITIONAL DATA
      7. PROCESSING THE SIGNALS
      8. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT
      9. COMPETITIVE POSITIONING
      10. GAINING AN EDGE: PERFORMANCE COUNTS
      11. COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE IN YOUR COMPANY
      12. COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE IN YOUR WORLD
      13. ETHICS IN COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE
      14. WITH WHOM DO YOU COMPETE?
      15. COMPETITOR SWOT
      16. HOW DO THEY DO WHAT THEY DO?
      17. THE FINAL ANALYSIS
      18. SUMMARY
      19. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    3. CHAPTER 8 FINDING MARKETS TO CONQUER BY UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMER NEEDS AND MARKET SEGMENTS
      1. THE COMMON DENOMINATOR IN SEGMENTATION: CUSTOMER NEEDS
      2. HOW MARKETS ARE SEGMENTED
      3. MARKET SEGMENTATION AND THE MARKETING MIX
      4. DESCRIBING THE TARGET MARKET
      5. THEY DON'T KNOW WHAT THEY DON'T KNOW
      6. PLANNING AND CARRYING OUT CUSTOMER VISITS
      7. THE VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
      8. USING PERSONAS AS A WAY TO CAPTURE NEEDS
      9. YOUR RESEARCH STRATEGY
      10. SUMMARY
      11. IMPROVE YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EQUIVALENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    4. CHAPTER 9 PREPARING TO SET YOUR MILEPOSTS: FORECASTING FOR THE PRODUCT MANAGER
      1. FORECASTING BASICS
      2. FORECASTING IS A CROSS-FUNCTIONAL EXERCISE
      3. VALIDATING MARKET AND DEMAND POTENTIAL
      4. FORECASTS ARE BUILT ON BELIEFS ABOUT THE FUTURE
      5. VALIDATING ASSUMPTIONS AND APPLYING CUSTOMER PREFERENCES
      6. HOW MUCH CAN WE REALLY MAKE? DERIVING MARKET SHARE ESTIMATES
      7. CASE STUDY EXAMPLE FOR FORECASTING
      8. SALES FORECASTING
      9. MAKING THE SALES FORECAST USEFUL
      10. DEMAND PLANNING
      11. CONCLUDING THE CASE
      12. SUMMARY
      13. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    5. CHAPTER 10 STRATEGIC PRODUCT PLANNING: THE INFLECTION POINT
      1. STRATEGY IS A DYNAMIC CONTINUUM
      2. USING A GENERIC STRATEGY
      3. STRATEGY IS LIKE SOLVING A PUZZLE
      4. THE WATERFALL EFFECT
      5. DYNAMIC STRATEGY FOR THE PRODUCT MANAGER
      6. STRATEGY IN YOUR WORLD
      7. THE "PRODUCT AS A BUSINESS" STRATEGIC PLANNING MODEL
      8. THE MODEL: A QUICK WALK-THROUGH
      9. THE PRODUCT AS A BUSINESS STRATEGIC PLANNING MODEL IN DETAIL
        1. Step A. Baseline the Business of the Product
          1. Organizing the Data
          2. External Data: Industry and Competition
          3. Customer Activity
          4. Organizational Capabilities and Financial Health
          5. Capturing Product Performance Data
          6. Synthesizing Data and Creating Useful Information
          7. Prepare to Tell a Story About the Product
          8. The State-of-the-Business Product Strategy Review
        2. Step B. Recast the Vision for the Product
        3. Step C. Identify Strategic Options
      10. SUMMARY
      11. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
  9. MODULE 3 THE START OF THE PRODUCT'S JOURNEY: THE NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
    1. INTRODUCTION TO MODULE 3
    2. LIMITS AND BENEFITS OF PROCESSES
    3. A GENERIC PHASE GATE MODEL
    4. PROCESSES ARE LINEAR, MARKETS ARE NOT
    5. IMPORTANCE OF THE RIGHT PACE FOR NEW PRODUCT PLANNING
    6. THE VALUE OF FLAWLESS EXECUTION
    7. ORGANIZATION OF THE NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT CHAPTERS
    8. CHAPTER 11 MAKING A MOLEHILL OUT OF A MOUNTAIN: THE CONCEPT PHASE
      1. THE BASIC PROCESS
      2. IDEATION: WHAT'S THE BIG IDEA?
      3. CATEGORIZATION OF PRODUCT "PROJECTS"
      4. SORTING OUT OPPORTUNITIES
      5. LOOKING DOWN THE PRODUCT PIPELINE
      6. PRODUCT ENHANCEMENTS AS A GROUPED OPPORTUNITY
      7. "SO WHAT?": THE VALUE PROPOSITION FOR THE OPPORTUNITY
      8. CLARIFYING YOUR IDENTITY WITH A POSITIONING STATEMENT
      9. POSITIONING MEANS MAKING A DIFFERENCE
      10. NARROWING THE FIELD: CHOOSING AMONG OPPORTUNITIES
      11. MANAGING REJECTED OPPORTUNITIES
      12. SECURING APPROVAL TO MOVE TO THE NEXT PHASE: THE CONCEPT REVIEW
      13. SUMMARY
      14. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    9. CHAPTER 12 IS THERE REALLY A BUSINESS HERE? ASSESSING FEASIBILITY
      1. USING FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLANS TO CLARIFY ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DELIVERABLES
      2. THE MARKETING FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN (THE MARKETING PLAN FOR THE PRODUCT)
      3. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT/IT/SYSTEMS FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      4. FINANCE FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      5. CUSTOMER SERVICE FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      6. SALES FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      7. OPERATIONS FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      8. SUPPLY CHAIN FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      9. LEGAL/REGULATORY/COMPLIANCE FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      10. MANUFACTURING FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      11. INTERNATIONAL FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      12. RESOURCE PLANNING AND SUMMARIZATION
      13. DOCUMENT EVOLUTION DURING FEASIBILITY
      14. PRODUCT PERFORMANCE AND MONITORING PLANNING
      15. THE DECISION MATRIX FOR THE FEASIBILITY PHASE
      16. PHASE REVIEW: FEASIBILITY
      17. SUMMARY
      18. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    10. CHAPTER 13 APPEARANCES ARE EVERYTHING: DEFINING THE PRODUCT
      1. PRODUCT DEFINITION DOCUMENTS
      2. MANAGING REQUIREMENTS
        1. Eliciting Requirements
        2. Defining Requirements
        3. Organizing Documents
        4. Managing Requirements from Beginning to End
      3. THE EVOLVING PRODUCT DESIGN
      4. LINKING THE PRODUCT DEFINITION TO "BUILDING" THE PRODUCT
      5. MAKE VERSUS BUY
      6. CARRYING OUT A MAKE VERSUS BUY ANALYSIS: AN EXAMPLE
      7. THE COUNTDOWN STARTS NOW: LAUNCH PLANNING
      8. COUNTING BACK: HOW TO MEET THE LAUNCH GOAL
      9. OTHER PARAMETERS FOR SUCCESSFUL LAUNCH PLANNING
      10. SETTING THE CONDITIONS TO RECOGNIZE FUTURE LIFE CYCLE STATES
      11. THE EXIT PLAN
      12. THE PRODUCT DEFINITION PHASE REVIEW
      13. SUMMARY
      14. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    11. CHAPTER 14 JUSTIFYING PRODUCT INVESTMENTS: THE BUSINESS CASE
      1. THE PURPOSE OF THE BUSINESS CASE
      2. CHARACTERISTICS OF GOOD BUSINESS CASES
      3. ACTIVITIES AND SEQUENCING
      4. BUSINESS CASE STRUCTURE
        1. Cover Page
        2. Executive Summary
        3. Framing
        4. Business Need and/or Strategic Fit
        5. Market Assessment
        6. Product Description
        7. Project Proposal
        8. Assumptions, Forecasts, and Financials
        9. Operations and Implementation
        10. Risk Analysis and Contingency Plans
        11. Recommendation
        12. Appendices
      5. KICK START THE BUSINESS CASE
      6. A CASE STUDY IN CREATING A BUSINESS CASE
      7. THE SAMPLE BUSINESS CASE
      8. CONCLUDING COMMENTS
      9. SUMMARY
      10. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    12. CHAPTER 15 SYNCHRONIZING THE GEARS: THE MARKETING PLAN FOR THE PRODUCT
      1. THE MARKETING PLAN FOR THE PRODUCT IS A FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN
      2. GETTING ORGANIZED
      3. MARKETING PLANS ALWAYS BEGIN WITH STRATEGY
      4. BUILDING A HISTORICAL MARKETING PROFILE
        1. Historical Inbound Programs
          1. Competitor Research
          2. Field Research Data
          3. Market Segmentation and/or Customer Research
          4. Industry Research Reports
          5. Checking for Inbound Data Sufficiency
        2. Historical Outbound Programs
          1. Advertising and Promotional Information
          2. Sales Information
          3. Marketing and Selling Collateral
        3. Using the Historical Profile
      5. PUTTING THE MARKETING MIX IN PERSPECTIVE
      6. OUTLINE FOR THE MARKETING PLAN
      7. SETTING THE TEAM UP WITH A REALISTIC MARKETING PLAN
      8. ESSENTIAL SECTIONS OF THE MARKETING PLAN
        1. Executive Summary
        2. Strategic Context for the Marketing Plan
        3. The Market Environment for the Product
        4. The Marketing Mix: Strategies and Tactics
          1. Product
          2. Pricing
          3. Promotion
          4. Place or Channel
        5. Marketing Alliances
        6. International Marketing Activities
        7. Product Launches Being Planned or Being Carried Out
        8. Sales Support and Training Programs
        9. Additional Research Programs Needed
        10. Cross-Functional Deliverables and Dependencies
        11. Integrated Budgets
        12. Measurements and Metrics
        13. Risks
        14. Appendices and Supporting Material
      9. SUMMARY
      10. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    13. CHAPTER 16 EXECUTION AND OVERSIGHT DURING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
      1. THE PRODUCT MANAGER'S ROLE DURING THE DEVELOPMENT PHASE
      2. THE PRODUCT MANAGER AS FACILITATOR AND PARTNER
      3. PRODUCT MANAGERS MUST UNDERSTAND EXECUTION
      4. TRUTH MIXED WITH COMPASSION
      5. SURFACING CONFLICTS AND REALITIES WITH "HOW" QUESTIONS
      6. PROGRESS TRACKING
      7. FREQUENT STATUS UPDATES ARE ESSENTIAL
      8. MANAGING PROJECT PLANS HELPS MANAGE RISK
      9. ADDITIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT TOOLS
      10. PROGRESS VALIDATION IS ESSENTIAL
      11. PRODUCT TESTING
      12. THE BETA TEST
      13. PRODUCT DOCUMENTATION
      14. MANAGING SCOPE AND BUDGET CREEP
      15. MANAGING CHANGE: TRADE-OFFS AND PRIORITIZATION DECISIONS
      16. THE DEVELOPMENT PHASE REVIEW AND CHECKLIST
      17. SUMMARY
      18. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    14. CHAPTER 17 INTRODUCING THE PRODUCT AND ORCHESTRATING THE LAUNCH
      1. LAUNCH BENCHMARKING OUTCOMES
      2. THE PRODUCT LAUNCH PHASE WORK FLOW
      3. EXECUTIVE CHAMPIONS NEED TO LEAD IMPORTANT PRODUCT LAUNCHES
      4. CONFIRM THE MARKET WINDOW
      5. SYNCHRONIZE YOUR DOCUMENTATION (THE BUSINESS CASE, MARKETING PLAN, AND LAUNCH PLAN)
      6. REVIEW MARKET AND BETA TESTS—OR CONDUCT THEM IF NECESSARY
      7. PRODUCT AVAILABILITY RATINGS
      8. PROVIDE ADEQUATE SALES TRAINING
      9. ENSURE READINESS OF MARKETING COLLATERAL, WEB SITE, AND INTEGRATED PROMOTIONAL PROGRAMS
      10. MAKE SURE DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS ARE ABLE TO SELL AND DELIVER THE PRODUCT
      11. ENSURE READINESS OF OPERATIONAL SYSTEMS
      12. LAUNCH METRICS MUST BE ASSEMBLED AND READY TO TRACK
      13. BE WILLING TO RECOMMEND GO OR NO-GO FOR LAUNCH
      14. THE ANNOUNCEMENT
      15. THE LAUNCH CHECKLIST
      16. SUMMARY
      17. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
  10. MODULE 4 CONTINUING THE JOURNEY: POST-LAUNCH PRODUCT MANAGEMENT
    1. INTRODUCTION TO MODULE 4
    2. CHAPTER 18 AUDITING RESULTS AFTER THE LAUNCH
      1. AFTERWARD
      2. USING AN IMPARTIAL AUDITOR
        1. Market Window Compliance
        2. Executive Sponsorship
        3. Business Case Synchronization
        4. Adequacy and Timing of Collateral
        5. Adequacy of Sales Training
        6. Reviewing Operational Readiness
        7. Conformance to Launch Metrics
      3. MAKE SURE TO CAPTURE LESSONS LEARNED
      4. WIN-LOSS AUDITS
        1. Internal Win-Loss Auditing
        2. External Win-Loss Auditing
        3. Assembling a Report
      5. SUMMARY
      6. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    3. CHAPTER 19 POST-LAUNCH PRODUCT MANAGEMENT: RUNNING THE BUSINESS
      1. RUNNING THE BUSINESS
      2. A STRUCTURE FOR RUNNING THE BUSINESS OF THE PRODUCT
      3. IDENTIFYING THE IN-MARKET LIFE CYCLE STATE OF THE PRODUCT
      4. DEFINING "WHAT'S HAPPENING NOW" WITH THE PRODUCT
      5. LEADING THE CROSS-FUNCTIONAL PRODUCT TEAM
        1. Product Team Meetings
      6. RECASTING THE STRATEGIC MIX
        1. Product Profitability and Financial Performance
        2. Unforgettable Customer Experiences
        3. Marketing Performance Management
          1. Revising the Marketing Mix
          2. Protecting the Brand
        4. Integrity in Doing Business
        5. Customer Loyalty
        6. Efficient Operations
      7. SUMMARY
      8. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    4. CHAPTER 20 LIFE CYCLE PRODUCT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT
      1. DISPELLING SOME MYTHS ABOUT PRODUCT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT
      2. WHAT IS LIFE CYCLE PRODUCT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT?
      3. A PORTFOLIO REFERENCE MODEL
      4. THE IDEAL WORK STRUCTURE FOR PRODUCT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT
        1. The Cross Functional Product Review Board
      5. A LIFE CYCLE PRODUCT PORTFOLIO MODEL
      6. METHODOLOGY
      7. CONSIDERING EXISTING PRODUCTS
      8. PRODUCT PROJECTS IN NEW PRODUCT INTRODUCTION
      9. PRODUCTS BEING PLANNED
      10. CREATE YOUR OWN PRODUCT PORTFOLIO MODEL
      11. PORTFOLIO DECISION MAKING
      12. AVAILABILITY OF DATA IS CRITICAL
      13. SUMMARY
      14. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
    5. CHAPTER 21 ENOUGH'S ENOUGH! DISCONTINUING THE PRODUCT
      1. BARRIERS TO DISCONTINUATION
      2. THE DISCONTINUATION DECISION
      3. PRODUCT DISCONTINUATION DOCUMENTATION
      4. Product Discontinuation Document
      5. THE CROSS-FUNCTIONAL TEAM
      6. OTHER TYPES OF "DISCONTINUATION"
      7. THE DISCONTINUATION NOTICE
      8. SUMMARY
      9. RAISING YOUR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE QUOTIENT (PMEQ)
  11. MODULE 5 PROFESSIONALIZING PRODUCT MANAGEMENT
    1. INTRODUCTION TO MODULE 5
    2. CHAPTER 22 CHARTING YOUR CAREER
      1. IT'S UP TO YOU
      2. A CAREER STRATEGY
      3. WHERE ARE YOU NOW?
      4. ASSESSING KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND EXPERIENCES
      5. CAREER ACTION PLANNING
      6. YOUR APPLIED LEARNING PROJECT
      7. SUMMARY
    3. CHAPTER 23 ORGANIZING FOR PRODUCT MANAGEMENT
      1. GETTING ORGANIZED
      2. THE ROLE OF THE EXECUTIVE CROSS-FUNCTIONAL TEAM
      3. TRANSFORMING THE ORGANIZATION
        1. Chartering and Supporting Cross-Functional Product Teams
          1. Empowerment
        2. Acting as the Product Portfolio Review Board and Directing Product Investments
        3. Assigning a Process Owner for All Product Portfolio Processes and Documents
          1. Providing the Systems and Tools for Product Planning and Performance Management
        4. Resolving Problems as Escalated by the Product Teams
        5. Ensuring Ongoing Professional Development of Product Managers
        6. Support the Building of a Product Management Community
        7. Establishing an Environment for Creating and Sustaining Customer Partnerships
        8. Investing in Market Research to Support the Product Teams
      4. COACHING PRODUCT MANAGERS
      5. SUMMARY
      6. Case Study: Product Management at Airlines Reporting Corporation (ARC)
  12. MODULE 6 THE PRODUCT MANAGER'S TOOLBOX
    1. THE PRODUCT MANAGER'S DESK REFERENCE WEB SITE
      1. A Community of Practice
    2. CUSTOMER VISIT PLAN TEMPLATE
    3. FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT PLAN TEMPLATE
    4. OPPORTUNITY STATEMENT TEMPLATE
    5. PRODUCT POSITIONING STATEMENT TEMPLATE
    6. BUSINESS CASE TEMPLATE
      1. SECTION 1—EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
      2. SECTION 2—FRAMING THE CASE
      3. SECTION 3—BUSINESS NEED AND/OR STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT
      4. SECTION 4—MARKET ANALYSIS
      5. SECTION 5—PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
      6. SECTION 6—THE PROJECT PROPOSAL
        1. Launch Support
      7. SECTION 7—ASSUMPTIONS, FORECASTS, AND FINANCIALS
        1. Financial Analysis
        2. Base Case Financials—Business as Usual (or Base Case)
        3. Business Case Financials—Scenario 1
      8. SECTION 8—IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATIONAL ACTION PLANS
      9. SECTION 9—RISKS AND CONTINGENCY PLANS
      10. SECTION 10—RECOMMENDATION
      11. SECTION 11—APPENDICES
    7. PRODUCT STRATEGY TEMPLATE
      1. DATA SYNTHESIS
    8. PRODUCT MARKETING PLAN TEMPLATE
      1. Marketing Plan Outline
      2. SECTION 1—EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
      3. SECTION 2—STRATEGIC CONTEXT
      4. SECTION 3—THE MARKETING ENVIRONMENT FOR THE PRODUCT
      5. SECTION 4—THE MARKETING MIX
      6. SECTION 5—MARKETING ALLIANCES
      7. SECTION 6—INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
      8. SECTION 7—PRODUCT LAUNCHES BEING PLANNED OR BEING CARRIED OUT
      9. SECTION 8—SALES TRAINING
      10. SECTION 9—ADDITIONAL RESEARCH PROGRAMS NEEDED
      11. SECTION 10—CROSS-FUNCTIONAL DEPENDENCIES OR DELIVERABLES
      12. SECTION 11—INTEGRATED BUDGETS FOR ALL PROGRAMS
      13. SECTION 12—MEASUREMENTS AND METRICS
      14. SECTION 13—RISKS
      15. SECTION 14—APPENDICES
    9. PRODUCT LAUNCH TEMPLATE
      1. The Product Launch Plan
      2. Carrying out the Product Launch (Executing)
    10. PRODUCT DISCONTINUATION OUTLINE
    11. PRODUCT MASTER PLAN OUTLINE
  13. GLOSSARY
  14. REFERENCES AND RESOURCES
    1. MAGAZINES, PERIODICALS, AND JOURNALS
    2. RESOURCES USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THIS BOOK
    3. OTHER GENERAL REFERENCES, INSTITUTIONS, AND ASSOCIATIONS
  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY
  16. INDEX