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The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game

Book Description

THE MULTIPLAYER CLASSROOM: DESIGNING COURSEWORK AS A GAME is a how-to guide to creating games for the classroom to better reach today's students. The book shows the reader how to create a teaching tool that will engage and excite students by using styles and formats found in popular video games. Readers will learn how to create a variety of multiplayer games on any subject, following the techniques and case studies presented. Bring your classroom into the 21st century!

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
    1. Dedication
  2. Acknowledgments
  3. About the Author
  4. Introduction
    1. Companion Blog
  5. One. Introduction
    1. 1. “Good Morning. You All Have an F.”
      1. Opening: The Slide
      2. Middle Game: The Shift
      3. Endgame: The Book
    2. 2. Games in the Classroom
      1. Educational Software
      2. Education Versus Entertainment
      3. Quest to Learn
  6. Two. Multiplayer Classroom
    1. 3. Theory and Practice of Game Design Syllabi
      1. Stay Flexible
      2. Class Overview
      3. Multiplayer Classroom Syllabus
      4. Grading Procedure
    2. 4. Theory and Practice of Game Design Class
      1. Zones
      2. Avatars
      3. Peer Review
        1. Peer Review Secret Ballot
      4. Student Evaluation Quotes
  7. Introduction
    1. 1. Marked Tree High School
      1. Introduction
      2. Levels
      3. Questing
      4. Reward System
      5. Student Opinions
      6. Data Analysis
      7. Conclusion
    2. 5. Multiplayer Game Design Syllabi
      1. The 2008 Syllabus
      2. Grading and Attendance
      3. Conduct
      4. The 2010 Syllabus
    3. 6. Multiplayer Game Design Class
      1. Zones
      2. Roles
      3. MMOs and Community
      4. Quizzes and Innovative Presentations
      5. Midterm Exam
      6. Student Evaluation Quotes
    4. 2. University of Arizona South: Teaching with Technology
      1. The Setup
      2. The Team
      3. The Course (Before)
      4. Why a Game?
      5. GAME Design
      6. Practical Challenges and Solutions
      7. Future Plans
      8. Works Cited
    5. 7. Introduction to Game Design Syllabus
      1. Theory and Design
      2. The 2010 Fall Syllabus
      3. Brand New Parts to the Syllabus
    6. 8. Introduction to Game Design Class
      1. Zones
      2. The Prototype
      3. References
      4. Level 8 Student Evaluation Quotes
    7. 3. Louisiana State University: Introduction to the Study of Education
    8. 9. Designing Interactive Characters Syllabus
      1. Cheating Versus Hacks
      2. A New Syllabus for a New Game
    9. 10. Designing Interactive Characters Class
      1. Using Back Stories
      2. Design Consistency
      3. Home Sweet Home
      4. The Geography of Valeria
      5. Messages from the Unknown
      6. Creating Characters
      7. Preparation for the Final Project
      8. Presentation Quests
      9. Another Message from the Unknown
      10. Midterm Prep PvP
      11. Midterm Boss Mob (Frost Lizard)
      12. The Most Recent Messages
    10. 4. Valencia Community College: United States History to 1877
      1. Observations
  8. Three. Game Design and Development
    1. 11. Identifying Learning Objectives and Student Needs
      1. How Students Learn
      2. How Gamers Learn
    2. 5. Robert Louis Stevenson Middle School: General Math
      1. About the Classroom
      2. How Knowledge Quest Was Introduced
      3. Why We Wanted to Turn Our Classroom into an RPG
    3. 12. Student Demographics
      1. Age
      2. Gender
      3. Income Level
    4. 6. Texas Tech University: History of Higher Education in the United States
    5. 13. How Games Are Designed
      1. The Teacher as Game Master
      2. Preproduction
      3. Begin with the Theme
      4. The Game’s Story
    6. 7. Ohio Valley College of Technology: Introduction to Keyboarding & Business Writing, Introduction to Computers
      1. Introduction
      2. Experience Points
      3. Avatars
      4. Choice
      5. Lingo
      6. Spreading the Word
      7. Intrinsic Motivation
      8. Mini Games
        1. Link Box
    7. 14. Production
      1. Prep
      2. Design
      3. Collecting Assets
      4. Alpha Testing
      5. Beta Testing
  9. Four. After the Launch
    1. 15. Playing the Game
      1. Lore
      2. Rules
      3. Scoring
      4. Staying Flexible
      5. Postmortem
    2. 8. Waunakee Community High School: Computer Science Classes
      1. Overview
      2. Experience Points and Levels
      3. Achievements
      4. Testing
      5. Excluded Concepts
      6. Conclusions
  10. Five. After this Book
    1. 16. Designing the Future
    2. 17. Resources
      1. Media
        1. How to Succeed in Game Design
        2. Applied Games (aka Serious Games)
        3. Related to Game Design (Game Designers Read These Books)
        4. Writing Games
        5. About Games
        6. About the Future
      2. Conferences
      3. Organizations