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The Little Book of Big Decision Models

Book Description


Leaders and Managers want quick answers, quick ways to reach solutions, ways and means to access knowledge that won’t eat into their precious time and quick ideas that deliver a big result.  The Little Book of Big Decision Models cuts through all the noise and gives managers access to the very best decision-making models that they need to to keep things moving forward. Every model is quick and easy to read and delivers the essential information and know-how quickly, efficiently and memorably.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title
  3. Contents
  4. Dedication
  5. About the author
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Introduction
  8. How to get the most out of this book
  9. SECTION 1 THE PRINCIPLES OF DECISION MAKING
    1. Introduction
    2. 1 Townsend’s rules of decision making
    3. 2 The McNamara Fallacy: The vital information that decision makers ignore
    4. 3 Using quantitative (hard) and qualitative (soft) data in decision making
    5. 4 Kreiner and Christensen: The Consequences Model
    6. 5 Tannenbaum and Schmidt: The decision-making spectrum
    7. 6 Rogers and Blenko: The RAPID Decision-Making Model
    8. 7 Cognitive mapping: Understanding how your colleagues think
    9. 8 Tacit knowledge and decision making
    10. 9 The Standard Decision-Making Model
    11. Conclusion
  10. SECTION 2 USING DATA IN DECISION MAKING
    1. Introduction
    2. 10 The Pareto Principle and the importance of the vital few
    3. 11 Lewin’s Force Field Analysis of the support and opposition to a decision
    4. 12 Scenario Analysis and charting possible futures
    5. 13 Delphic Forecasting and how to firm up predictions
    6. 14 Johnson, Scholes and Whittington: Mapping stakeholders’ reactions
    7. 15 Egan’s Shadow Side Model: Dealing with the politics of decisions
    8. 16 The SCAMPER Model and finding creative solutions
    9. 17 De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats Model: Generating different perspectives
    10. Conclusion
  11. SECTION 3 ENHANCING YOUR DECISION-MAKING SKILLS
    1. Introduction
    2. 18 The Eisenhower Principle and the delegation of decisions
    3. 19 The feedback and criticism continuum
    4. 20 Learning to think outside the box
    5. 21 Goleman: Using Emotional Intelligence to make better decisions
    6. 22 Ghoshal and Bruch: Reclaiming your job
    7. Conclusion
  12. SECTION 4 DECISION MODELS ABOUT YOU
    1. Introduction
    2. 23 Christensen’s strategy for a happy life
    3. 24 Dealing with your past: Hang-ups and triumphs
    4. 25 Dealing with dilemmas
    5. 26 Ethical decision making
    6. 27 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, wants and dreams
    7. 28 Csikszentmihalyi’s Flow Model and the joy of working in ‘the zone’
    8. 29 Johari Windows: A guide to your personality
    9. 30 Managing unrealistic expectations
    10. 31 Your attitude to risk
    11. 32 Deciding when to abandon ship
    12. Conclusion
  13. SECTION 5 DECISION MODELS ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE
    1. Introduction
    2. 33 How to choose your default management style
    3. 34 Deciding if you are a manager or a leader
    4. 35 Appointment decisions
    5. 36 Goffee and Jones: Why should anyone be led by you?
    6. 37 Hersey and Blanchard: The Situational Leadership Model
    7. 38 Manzoni and Barsoux: How managers set staff up to fail
    8. 39 Dansereau, Graen and Haga: How managers set staff up to succeed
    9. 40 Herzberg’s Motivation and Hygiene Theory: Choosing the right carrots
    10. 41 The feedback sandwich: Delivering negative feedback
    11. 42 McGregor’s features of effective and ineffective teams
    12. 43 Ruiz’s Four Agreements – Acting with integrity
    13. Conclusion
  14. SECTION 6 STRATEGIC AND MARKET DECISION MODELS
    1. Introduction
    2. 44 The standard Product Life Cycle Model
    3. 45 The Long-Tail Market Model
    4. 46 The Chasm Market Model
    5. 47 Milgram’s Six Degrees of Separation Model
    6. 48 Kim and Mauborgne’s Blue Ocean Strategy
    7. 49 Offshoring core activities
    8. 50 Moore’s Headpin Model
    9. 51 The Boston Consulting Group Matrix
    10. Conclusion
  15. SECTION 7 ORGANISATIONAL THREAT ANALYSIS
    1. Introduction
    2. 52 SWOT – Done right!
    3. 53 PEST – Done right!
    4. 54 The Unexploded Bomb Model: Unknown and unforeseen threats
    5. 55 Taleb: The Black Swan Model and unknowable threats
    6. 56 The Black Box Model
    7. Conclusion
  16. SECTION 8 FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL MODELS
    1. Introduction
    2. 57 Risk–reward analysis
    3. 58 Kaplan and Norton: The balanced scorecard
    4. 59 Discounted cashflow (DCF): Calculating today’s value of tomorrow’s returns
    5. 60 Cost–Benefit Analysis: Accounting for non-financial factors
    6. 61 Breakeven analysis: Knowing if you can reduce prices
    7. 62 Gap Analysis: Closing the gap between forecast and target
    8. 63 Zero-based budgeting: Making the right budget cuts
    9. Conclusion
  17. SECTION 9 HOW TO SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENT YOUR DECISIONS
    1. Introduction
    2. 64 Round’s TRAP Model
    3. 65 Johnson’s three rules of project management
    4. 66 Shewhart’s Plan, Do, Check, Act (PDCA) Implementation Model
    5. 67 Orlandella and Reason: The Swiss Cheese Model and how to stop problems escalating
    6. 68 Setting SMART targets that get results
    7. 69 Kim and Mauborgne’s Tipping Point Leadership: How to avoid implementation problems
    8. 70 Cooperrider and Srivastva’s Appreciative Inquiry (AI) Model and the power of positivity
    9. Conclusion
  18. Personal characteristics and how they can produce good and bad decisions
  19. The First 11 Team
  20. A final word
  21. What did you think of this book?
  22. Recommended reading
  23. Index