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The Leader's Guide to Radical Management: Reinventing the Workplace for the 21st Century

Book Description

A radical new management model for twenty-first century leaders

Organizations today face a crisis. The crisis is of long standing and its signs are widespread. Most proposals for improving management address one element of the crisis at the expense of the others. The principles described by award-winning author Stephen Denning simultaneously inspire high productivity, continuous innovation, deep job satisfaction and client delight. Denning puts forward a fundamentally different approach to management, with seven inter-locking principles of continuous innovation: focusing the entire organization on delighting clients; working in self-organizing teams; operating in client-driven iterations; delivering value to clients with each iteration; fostering radical transparency; nurturing continuous self-improvement and communicating interactively. In sum, the principles comprise a new mental model of management.

  • Author outlines the basic seven principles of continuous innovation

  • The book describes more than seventy supporting practices

  • Denning offers a rethinking of management from first principles

This book is written by the author of The Secret Language of Leadership—a Financial Times Selection in Best Books of 2007.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. PREFACE
  3. INTRODUCTION
    1. THE MARKETPLACE HAS CHANGED
    2. THE WORKPLACE HAS ALSO CHANGED
    3. THE SYSTEM IS THE PROBLEM
    4. THE SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF RADICAL MANAGEMENT
    5. PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
    6. WHO THIS BOOK IS FOR
  4. 1. MANAGEMENT TODAY
    1. 1.1. THE ABSTRACT WRITER
    2. 1.2. THE AUDITOR
    3. 1.3. THE SOFTWARE DEVELOPER
    4. 1.4. THE BANKER
    5. 1.5. THE CONSULTANT
    6. 1.6. THE PARADOX OF MANAGERIAL SUCCESS
  5. 2. A BRIEF HISTORY OF MANAGEMENT
    1. 2.1. WHY TRADITIONAL MANAGEMENT IS STRUGGLING
      1. 2.1.1. Work Has Shifted from Semiskilled to Knowledge Work
      2. 2.1.2. The Organization Needs the Commitment of the Workforce
      3. 2.1.3. The Customer Takes Charge
      4. 2.1.4. The System Has Stopped Delivering
    2. 2.2. HOW THE WORKPLACE HAS EVOLVED
      1. 2.2.1. Work as a System of Things
      2. 2.2.2. Frederick Taylor: The System Ahead of People
      3. 2.2.3. The Assembly Line
      4. 2.2.4. Applying Taylorism to Management Itself
      5. 2.2.5. Applying Taylorism to Marketing
      6. 2.2.6. Planning, Programming, and Budgeting
    3. 2.3. THE SITUATION REACHES A CRISIS POINT
      1. 2.3.1. Business Process Reengineering
      2. 2.3.2. The Crisis Worsens
      3. 2.3.3. The System Is the Problem
    4. 2.4. A NEW START
      1. 2.4.1. Breaking the Iron Triangle
      2. 2.4.2. Reinventing the Workplace from First Principles
  6. 3. WHAT RADICAL MANAGEMENT MEANS
    1. 3.1. SEVEN BASIC PRINCIPLES OF CONTINUOUS INNOVATION
      1. 3.1.1. Principle #1: Focus Work on Delighting the Client
      2. 3.1.2. Principle #2: Do Work Through Self-Organizing Teams
      3. 3.1.3. Principle #3: Do Work in Client-Driven Iterations
      4. 3.1.4. Principle #4: Deliver Value to Clients Each Iteration
      5. 3.1.5. Principle #5: Be Totally Open About Impediments to Improvement
      6. 3.1.6. Principle #6: Create a Context for Continuous Self-Improvement by the Team Itself
      7. 3.1.7. Principle #7: Communicate Through Interactive Conversations
      8. 3.1.8. An Inexorable Sequence
    2. 3.2. AN INTEGRATED SET OF MEASURES
    3. 3.3. THE IDEA IN ACTION: EASEL CORPORATION
      1. 3.3.1. The Surgical Team
      2. 3.3.2. The High-Performance Product Development Team
      3. 3.3.3. Putting the Pieces Together
    4. 3.4. WHERE IS IT HAPPENING?
    5. 3.5. HOW WILL IT HAPPEN MORE WIDELY?
  7. I. THE SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF CONTINUOUS INNOVATION
    1. 4. PRINCIPLE #1: DELIGHTING CLIENTS
      1. 4.1. THE MEANING OF WORK
      2. 4.2. THE NEW LOCALISM
      3. 4.3. THE ORGANIZATION'S PRIMARY GOAL: THINGS VERSUS PEOPLE
      4. 4.4. THE CASE OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR ORGANIZATION
      5. 4.5. DEVELOPMENT VERSUS PRODUCTION
        1. 4.5.1. The Supermarket Checkout Clerk
        2. 4.5.2. The Chinese Quilt Maker
      6. 4.6. DO WE HAVE THE RIGHT GOAL?
      7. 4.7. WHO DECIDES?
      8. 4.8. MEASURING CLIENT DELIGHT
      9. 4.9. THE ADDICTION TO BAD PROFITS
      10. 4.10. THE DESIGN OF THE INSTRUMENT
      11. 4.11. WHY ARE WE NOT BEING DELIGHTED?
        1. 4.11.1. What the Web Sites Revealed
          1. 4.11.1.1. Public Relations Goals
          2. 4.11.1.2. Making Money or Producing Goods and Services
          3. 4.11.1.3. Client Delight
        2. 4.11.2. Implications
      12. 4.12. PRACTICES FOR DELIGHTING CLIENTS
    2. 5. PRINCIPLE #2: SELF-ORGANIZING TEAMS
      1. 5.1. THE CASE OF HENRY FITZEMPRESS
      2. 5.2. WHY SELF-ORGANIZING GROUPS WORK
      3. 5.3. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SELF-ORGANIZING TEAMS
      4. 5.4. THE BENEFITS OF TEAMS
      5. 5.5. WHY TEAMS KEEP BEING REDISCOVERED
        1. 5.5.1. Managers' Short Memories
        2. 5.5.2. The Confusion of Language with Reality
        3. 5.5.3. Failure to Transfer Power
        4. 5.5.4. Conflict with the Default Mental Model of Management
        5. 5.5.5. Teams Didn't Work
        6. 5.5.6. Managers Didn't Know How to Sustain High-Performing Teams
      6. 5.6. PRACTICES FOR CREATING SELF-ORGANIZING TEAMS
    3. 6. PRINCIPLE #3: CLIENT-DRIVEN ITERATIONS
      1. 6.1. ITERATIONS AT TOYOTA
      2. 6.2. ITERATIONS IN BUILDING HOUSES
      3. 6.3. MEANING IN WORK AND MEANING AT WORK
      4. 6.4. THE USE OF ITERATIVE WORK PATTERNS
      5. 6.5. BUSTING THE IRON TRIANGLE OF MANAGEMENT
      6. 6.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR WORK IN GENERAL
      7. 6.7. PRACTICES FOR CLIENT-DRIVEN ITERATIONS
    4. 7. PRINCIPLE #4: DELIVERING VALUE TO CLIENTS IN EACH ITERATION
      1. 7.1. UNDERSTANDING PHANTOM WORK JAMS
        1. 7.1.1. A House Renovation
        2. 7.1.2. The Health Sector
      2. 7.2. IDENTIFYING AND REMOVING PHANTOM WORK JAMS
      3. 7.3. THE MANAGEMENT MIND-SET PROBLEM
        1. 7.3.1. The False Trade-Off Between Time and Quality
        2. 7.3.2. The Psychological Constraint
        3. 7.3.3. Cultural Barriers in High-End Professional Work
      4. 7.4. TACTICS FOR INTRODUCING RADICAL MANAGEMENT
        1. 7.4.1. Tactic #1: The Future is Already Here
        2. 7.4.2. Tactic #2: Interacting with Other Organizations
        3. 7.4.3. Tactic #3: Getting a Better Work-Life Balance
        4. 7.4.4. Tactic #4: Smaller Tasks
      5. 7.5. PRACTICES FOR DELIVERING VALUE TO CLIENTS
    5. 8. PRINCIPLE #5: RADICAL TRANSPARENCY
      1. 8.1. THE STRUGGLE BETWEEN TRUTH AND POWER
      2. 8.2. THE BLUE PILL VERSUS THE RED PILL
        1. 8.2.1. Taking the Blue Pill
        2. 8.2.2. Taking the Red Pill
      3. 8.3. THE PARALLEL TO SCIENCE
      4. 8.4. THE SCOPE OF RADICAL TRANSPARENCY
        1. 8.4.1. Genuine Responsibility and Accountability
        2. 8.4.2. The Courage to Be
      5. 8.5. PRACTICES FOR ESTABLISHING RADICAL TRANSPARENCY
    6. 9. PRINCIPLE #6: CONTINUOUS SELF-IMPROVEMENT
      1. 9.1. THE EXPERIENCE OF CONTINUOUS SELF-IMPROVEMENT
      2. 9.2. THE CONCEPT OF CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
      3. 9.3. THE TOYOTA APPROACH AT FREMONT
      4. 9.4. THE IMPACT OF THE TOYOTA APPROACH
      5. 9.5. UNDERSTANDING WHAT TOYOTA DOES
      6. 9.6. THE MEANING OF LEAN
      7. 9.7. UNINTENDED ACCELERATION
      8. 9.8. THE SAYLOR CASE
      9. 9.9. A CRISIS OR AN OPPORTUNITY?
      10. 9.10. THREE FACTS
        1. 9.10.1. Toyota (Still) Makes High-Quality Cars
        2. 9.10.2. Toyota Failed to Fix a Significant Problem for at Least Five Years
        3. 9.10.3. Toyota's Communications were Clumsy
      11. 9.11. FOUR LESSONS FOR CONTINUOUS SELF-IMPROVEMENT
        1. 9.11.1. Continuous Self-Improvement Requires a Particular Mind-Set
        2. 9.11.2. Continuous Self-Improvement Is Fragile
        3. 9.11.3. Communications Are Crucial
        4. 9.11.4. Continuous Self-Improvement Is a Top Management Responsibility
      12. 9.12. PRACTICES FOR CONTINUOUS SELF-IMPROVEMENT
    7. 10. PRINCIPLE #7: INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION
      1. 10.1. THREE DIFFERENT WORLDS
        1. 10.1.1. Dealing Simultaneously with Three Different Worlds
        2. 10.1.2. Communications within Marriages
      2. 10.2. THE COMMUNICATION CHALLENGE FOR MANAGERS
      3. 10.3. THE POWER OF NARRATIVE
        1. 10.3.1. Communicating as a Traditional Manager
        2. 10.3.2. Communicating as a Radical Manager
      4. 10.4. THE CONCEPT OF CONVERSATION
      5. 10.5. PUTTING THE BOUNDARIES IN THE RIGHT PLACE
      6. 10.6. PRACTICES FOR INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION
  8. II. IMPLEMENTATION
    1. 11. A RIVER OF CASCADING CONVERSATIONS
      1. 11.1. MY INITIATION INTO RADICAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT
      2. 11.2. SOME PRACTICES OF RADICAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT
        1. 11.2.1. The Journey of Total Attorneys
        2. 11.2.2. The Journey of Standard & Poor's
        3. 11.2.3. The Journey of Systematic Software
        4. 11.2.4. The Journey of Open View Venture Partners
        5. 11.2.5. The Outsider as Change Agent: Björn Granvik
        6. 11.2.6. The Journey of Salesforce.com
        7. 11.2.7. The Journey of Thogus Products
        8. 11.2.8. What We can Learn from These Stories
          1. 11.2.8.1. Radical Management Happens Organically or Not at All
          2. 11.2.8.2. Everyone Can Be a Radical Manager
          3. 11.2.8.3. The Distinction Between Leadership and Management Dissolves
          4. 11.2.8.4. Outsiders Can Help Momentum
      3. 11.3. WHAT WILL BE YOUR STORY?
      4. 11.4. PRACTICES TO SUPPORT IMPLEMENTATION OF RADICAL MANAGEMENT
    2. 12. EPILOGUE
      1. 12.1. SIMPLE TO UNDERSTAND, DIFFICULT TO IMPLEMENT
      2. 12.2. THE SPIRIT OF RADICAL MANAGEMENT
      3. 12.3. MAKING FRIENDS WITH SURPRISE
      4. 12.4. MEANING IN WORK AND AT WORK IS PART OF BEING HUMAN
      5. 12.5. RADICAL MANAGEMENT IS PART OF A LARGER STORY
  9. A. SUMMARY OF RADICAL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
    1. A.1. Delighting Clients (Chapter Four)
    2. A.2. Self-Organizing Teams (Chapter Five)
    3. A.3. Client-Driven Iterations (Chapter Six)
    4. A.4. Delivering Value to Clients (Chapter Seven)
    5. A.5. Radical Transparency (Chapter Eight)
    6. A.6. Continuous Self-Improvement (Chapter Nine)
    7. A.7. Interactive Communication (Chapter Ten)
    8. A.8. Implementation of Radical Change Management (Chapter Eleven)
  10. NOTES
    1. PREFACE
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. CHAPTER ONE
    4. CHAPTER TWO
    5. CHAPTER THREE
    6. CHAPTER FOUR
    7. CHAPTER FIVE
    8. CHAPTER SIX
    9. CHAPTER SEVEN
    10. CHAPTER EIGHT
    11. CHAPTER NINE
    12. CHAPTER TEN
    13. CHAPTER ELEVEN
    14. CHAPTER TWELVE
  11. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  12. ABOUT THE AUTHOR