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The Internet: The Missing Manual by David Pogue, J.D. Biersdorfer

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Writing and Sending Messages

Once you've gone to all the trouble to set up and configure your email account, odds are you're going to want to tell everyone you know to drop you a line. Here's how to create and send a message of your own.

  1. Open your email program or go to the Web site of the Webmail company you use. Log in and create a new outgoing message (see Figure 14-5).

    You do that by clicking a New or Create Mail button, or by choosing File → New Message (or however your program phrases it).

    A message has two sections: the header, which holds information about the message; and the body, the big empty white area that contains the message itself. In addition, the mail window has a toolbar, which you can use to access other features for composing and sending messages. The signature pop-up menu doesn't exist until you create a signature (Section 14.3).

    Figure 14-5. A message has two sections: the header, which holds information about the message; and the body, the big empty white area that contains the message itself. In addition, the mail window has a toolbar, which you can use to access other features for composing and sending messages. The signature pop-up menu doesn't exist until you create a signature (Section 14.3).

  2. Type an email address into the "To:" box.

    If somebody's name is in your address book, just type the first couple letters of the name; most email programs automatically complete the address. (If the first guess is wrong, just type another letter or two until the program revises its guess.)

    If you're typing in the address manually, remember that there are no spaces in email addresses; everything's squished together on either side of the @ symbol.

    As in most dialog boxes, you can jump from blank to blank (from the "To:" field ...

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