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The Internet: The Missing Manual by David Pogue, J.D. Biersdorfer

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Feeds: Having the News Come to You

If you've slogged through this much of this chapter, you're clearly getting the idea that there's a lot to read on the Web. Way, way too much, actually. Who on earth would have the time to go clicking around to even a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of the world's 20 billion Web pages?

Nobody. That's why the ranks of the truly time-efficient have dreamed up a way for the best Web sites to send their information to you, through a recent invention called a news feed or RSS feed.

If you use the latest version of Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Safari, you can sign up for a Web site's feed right in your browser—for free (and, gloriously, ad-free). When you've stumbled onto a Web site that offers a feed, a special icon appears at the top of your browser window to let you know (Figure 5-5). Just click it to subscribe to the feed.

Most mainstream news sites now offer RSS feeds to keep you up to date on current events. Many blogs offer feeds as well and subscribing to a feed alerts you whenever your favorite blogger has summoned the energy to make another post.

Top: If you use Safari, Internet Explorer, or Firefox as your browser, you'll know when you're on a Web site that offers an RSS feed; a special RSS icon lets you know.Bottom: Clicking the icon either adds the feed to your subscriptions (Internet Explorer, Firefox) or, in Safari, shows you what the feed looks like (at which point you can create a bookmark to subscribe).

Figure 5-5. Top: If you use Safari, Internet Explorer, or Firefox as your browser, you'll know when you're on a Web site that offers an RSS feed; a special RSS icon lets you know. Bottom: Clicking the icon either adds the feed to your subscriptions (Internet Explorer, Firefox) or, in Safari, ...

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