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The Internet of Things: Connecting Objects

Book Description

Internet of Things: Connecting Objects... puts forward the technologies and the networking architectures which make it possible to support the Internet of Things. Amongst these technologies, RFID, sensor and PLC technologies are described and a clear view on how they enable the Internet of Things is given. This book also provides a good overview of the main issues facing the Internet of Things such as the issues of privacy and security, application and usage, and standardization.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Preface
  5. Chapter 1: Introduction to the Internet of Things
    1. 1.1. Introduction
    2. 1.2. History of IoT
    3. 1.3. About objects/things in the IoT
    4. 1.4. The identifier in the IoT
    5. 1.5. Enabling technologies of IoT
      1. 1.5.1. Identification technology
      2. 1.5.2. Sensing and actuating technology
      3. 1.5.3. Other technologies
      4. 1.5.4. Connected objects’ communication
        1. 1.5.4.1. Object-to-object
        2. 1.5.4.2. Object or network of objects to other networks
    6. 1.6. About the Internet in IoT
    7. 1.7. Bibliography
  6. Chapter 2: Radio Frequency Identification Technology Overview
    1. 2.1. Introduction
    2. 2.2. Principle of RFID
    3. 2.3. Components of an RFID system
      1. 2.3.1. Reader
      2. 2.3.2. RFID tag
      3. 2.3.3. RFID middleware
        1. 2.3.3.1. Device interface
        2. 2.3.3.2. Core processing interface
        3. 2.3.3.3. Application interface
    4. 2.4. Issues
    5. 2.5. Bibliography
  7. Chapter 3: Wireless Sensor Networks: Technology Overview
    1. 3.1. History and context
      1. 3.1.1. From smart dust to smart plants
      2. 3.1.2. Application requirements in modern WSNs
        1. 3.1.2.1. Number, geometry and topology
        2. 3.1.2.2. Data flows
        3. 3.1.2.3. Latency-bounded reliability
        4. 3.1.2.4. Lifetime, cost and size
        5. 3.1.2.5. Security
    2. 3.2. The node
      1. 3.2.1. Communication
      2. 3.2.2. Computation
      3. 3.2.3. Sensing
      4. 3.2.4. Energy
    3. 3.3. Connecting nodes
      1. 3.3.1. Radio basics
      2. 3.3.2. Common misconceptions
      3. 3.3.3. Reliable communication in practice: channel hopping
    4. 3.4. Networking nodes
      1. 3.4.1. Medium access control
        1. 3.4.1.1. Preamble sampling protocols
        2. 3.4.1.2. Framed MAC protocols
      2. 3.4.2. Multi-hop routing
        1. 3.4.2.1. IETF MANET: a complex inheritance
        2. 3.4.2.2. Geographic routing
        3. 3.4.2.3. Gradient routing
    5. 3.5. Securing communication
    6. 3.6. Standards and Fora
    7. 3.7. Conclusion
    8. 3.8. Bibliography
  8. Chapter 4: Power Line Communication Technology Overview
    1. 4.1. Introduction
    2. 4.2. Overview of existing PLC technologies and standards
      1. 4.2.1. History of PLC technologies
      2. 4.2.2. Different types of in-home PLC technologies
        1. 4.2.2.1. In-home high-speed/broadband PLC technologies (with high bit rate)
        2. 4.2.2.2. In-home PLC technologies with low bit rate
        3. 4.2.2.3. Different network topologies
      3. 4.2.3. Security
      4. 4.2.4. Performances of PLC technologies
      5. 4.2.5. Standards and normalization
    3. 4.3. Architectures for home network applications
      1. 4.3.1. Architecture for a high bit-rate home network application
      2. 4.3.2. Architecture for low bit-rate home network application
    4. 4.4. Internet of things using PLC technology
      1. 4.4.1. Connecting objects in the indoor environment
      2. 4.4.2. Interoperability of connecting objects in the home environment
    5. 4.5. Conclusion
    6. 4.6. Bibliography
  9. Chapter 5: RFID Applications and Related Research Issues
    1. 5.1. Introduction
    2. 5.2. Concepts and terminology
      1. 5.2.1. Radio-frequency identification
      2. 5.2.2. Transponder (tag) classes
        1. 5.2.2.1. Passive tags
        2. 5.2.2.2. Semi-passive tags
        3. 5.2.2.3. Active tags
      3. 5.2.3. Standards
      4. 5.2.4. RFID system architecture
      5. 5.2.5. Other related technologies
        1. 5.2.5.1. Near-field communication
        2. 5.2.5.2. Nano-RFID
        3. 5.2.5.3. Smart dust
        4. 5.2.5.4. RFID sensors
        5. 5.2.5.5. Contactless smart cards
    3. 5.3. RFID applications
      1. 5.3.1. Logistics and supply chain
      2. 5.3.2. Production, monitoring and maintenance
      3. 5.3.3. Product safety, quality and information
      4. 5.3.4. Access control and tracking and tracing of individuals
      5. 5.3.5. Loyalty, membership and payment
      6. 5.3.6. Household
      7. 5.3.7. Other applications
    4. 5.4. Ongoing research projects
      1. 5.4.1. Hardware issues
        1. 5.4.1.1. Reader-related research
        2. 5.4.1.2. Tags
          1. 5.4.1.2.1. Chip
          2. 5.4.1.2.2. Antenna
      2. 5.4.2. Protocols
        1. 5.4.2.1. Security
        2. 5.4.2.2. Collision
    5. 5.5. Summary and conclusions
    6. 5.6. Bibliography
  10. Chapter 6: RFID Deployment for Location and Mobility Management on the Internet
    1. 6.1. Introduction
    2. 6.2. Background and related work
      1. 6.2.1. Localization
        1. 6.2.1.1. Triangulation
        2. 6.2.1.2. Scene analysis
        3. 6.2.1.3. Proximity
      2. 6.2.2. Mobility management
        1. 6.2.2.1. MIP
        2. 6.2.2.2. Link-layer handover
        3. 6.2.2.3. Network-layer handover
        4. 6.2.2.4. Movement detection process
    3. 6.3. Localization and handover management relying on RFID
      1. 6.3.1. A technology overview of RFID
      2. 6.3.2. How RFID can help localization and mobility management
        1. 6.3.2.1. RFID-enabled localization
        2. 6.3.2.2. RFID-enabled movement detection
      3. 6.3.3. Conceptual framework
        1. 6.3.3.1. Training phase
        2. 6.3.3.2. Real-time phase
        3. 6.3.3.3. Positioning algorithm
        4. 6.3.3.4. Decision function
    4. 6.4. Technology considerations
      1. 6.4.1. Path loss model
      2. 6.4.2. Antenna radiation pattern
      3. 6.4.3. Multiple tags-to-reader collisions
        1. 6.4.3.1. Anti-collision algorithms
      4. 6.4.4. Multiple readers-to-tag collisions
        1. 6.4.4.1. Reader collision probability
      5. 6.4.5. Reader-to-reader interference
        1. 6.4.5.1. Read range reduction
      6. 6.4.6. Interference from specific materials
    5. 6.5. Performance evaluation
      1. 6.5.1. Simulation setup
      2. 6.5.2. Performance results
        1. 6.5.2.1. Localization accuracy
        2. 6.5.2.2. Movement detection latency
    6. 6.6. Summary and conclusions
    7. 6.7. Bibliography
  11. Chapter 7: The Internet of Things — Setting the Standards
    1. 7.1. Introduction
    2. 7.2. Standardizing the IoT
      1. 7.2.1. Why standardize?
      2. 7.2.2. What needs to be standardized?
    3. 7.3. Exploiting the potential of RFID
      1. 7.3.1. Technical specifications
      2. 7.3.2. Radio spectrum and electromagnetic compatibility
    4. 7.4. Identification in the IoT
      1. 7.4.1. A variety of data formats
      2. 7.4.2. Locating every thing: IPv6 addresses
      3. 7.4.3. Separating identifiers and locators in IP: the HIP
      4. 7.4.4. Beyond the tag: multimedia information access
    5. 7.5. Promoting ubiquitous networking: any where, any when, any what
      1. 7.5.1. Wireless sensor networks
      2. 7.5.2. Networking the home
      3. 7.5.3. Next generation networks
    6. 7.6. Safeguarding data and consumer privacy
    7. 7.7. Conclusions
    8. 7.8. Bibliography
  12. Chapter 8: Governance of the Internet of Things
    1. 8.1. Introduction
      1. 8.1.1. Notion of governance
      2. 8.1.2. Aspects of governance
    2. 8.2. Bodies subject to governing principles
      1. 8.2.1. Overview
      2. 8.2.2. Private organizations
        1. 8.2.2.1. EPCglobal
        2. 8.2.2.2. VeriSign
        3. 8.2.2.3. ICANN
      3. 8.2.3. International regulator and supervisor
        1. 8.2.3.1. Conceptual background theories
        2. 8.2.3.2. Newly established organization
        3. 8.2.3.3. New committee of the World Trade Organization
        4. 8.2.3.4. New committee of OECD
    3. 8.3. Substantive principles for IoT governance
      1. 8.3.1. Legitimacy and inclusion of stakeholders
      2. 8.3.2. Transparency
      3. 8.3.3. Accountability
    4. 8.4. IoT infrastructure governance
      1. 8.4.1. Robustness
      2. 8.4.2. Availability
      3. 8.4.3. Reliability
      4. 8.4.4. Interoperability
      5. 8.4.5. Access
    5. 8.5. Further governance issues
      1. 8.5.1. Practical implications
      2. 8.5.2. Legal implications
    6. 8.6. Outlook
    7. 8.7. Bibliography
  13. Conclusion
  14. List of Authors
  15. Index