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The Handbook of Global Security Policy

Book Description

This Handbook brings together 30 state-of-the-art essays covering the essential aspects of global security research and practice for the 21st century.

  • Embraces a broad definition of security that extends beyond the threat of foreign military attack to cover new risks for violence

  • Offers comprehensive coverage framed around key security concepts, risks, policy tools, and global security actors

  • Discusses pressing contemporary issues including terrorism, disarmament, genocide, sustainability, international peacekeeping, state-building, natural disasters, energy and food security, climate change, and cyber warfare

  • Includes insightful and accessible contributions from around the world aimed at a broad base of scholars, students, practitioners, and policymakers

  • Table of Contents

    1. Notes on Contributors
    2. Introduction: Global Security Policy in the Twenty-First Century
      1. Structure and Organization of the Book
      2. Note
      3. References
    3. Part I Key Concepts
      1. Chapter 1 Global Security
        1. What is a Global Security Issue? <i xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">Existential</i> and and <i xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">Emancipatory</i> Threats Threats
        2. Where Are We In History? The Paradoxes of Proximity
        3. Where Are We Going? The Evolving Global Securityscape and the Inconvenient Truth of the International
        4. The Challenge: Can we Escape the “Madness of Sanity”?
        5. Notes
        6. References
      2. Chapter 2 Security and Social Critique
        1. Security Studies Meets Social Critique
        2. Feminism and the Critique of Violence
        3. After Frankfurt: Security as Emancipation
        4. The Radical Promise of Poststructuralism
        5. Conclusion
        6. Notes
        7. References
      3. Chapter 3 Gender and Security
        1. State-Centric Security and Gendered Violences
        2. The Securitization of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence
        3. Humanizing Security, Gendering Security?
        4. Gender Narratives and the “War on Terror”
        5. Conclusion
        6. Notes
        7. References
      4. Chapter 4 Security Policy and (Global) Risk(s)
        1. Introduction
        2. The Modern Invention Called “Risk”
        3. Security Policies and the Logic of “Risk'
        4. “Global Risks” and the Imperative to Rethink Modern (Security) Institutions
        5. Conclusion
        6. Note
        7. References
      5. Chapter 5 Human Security
        1. The Evolution of the Concept of Human Security
        2. The Critiques of Human Security
        3. Reconstructing Human Security
        4. Notes
        5. References
    4. Part II Policy Arenas
      1. Chapter 6 Nuclear Disarmament and Nonproliferation
        1. Deconstructing Nonproliferation and Disarmament
        2. Nuclear Nonproliferation
        3. Nuclear Disarmament
        4. New Frontiers in Policy and Research
        5. Comparative Conclusions: Beyond Nuclear Politics
        6. Notes
        7. References
      2. Chapter 7 Terrorism and Antiterrorism
        1. Progress in Defining Terrorism
        2. The Rise of Terrorism in the Early Twenty-First Century
        3. Transnationalization of Terrorism
        4. “Global Terrorism” After 9/11: Transformation and/or Decline?
        5. Causes and Explanations of Terrorism
        6. Specifics of Antiterrorism
        7. Conclusion
        8. References
      3. Chapter 8 Genocide and Large-Scale Human Rights Violations
        1. Conceptual and Legal Parameters
        2. The History of Genocide in Academic Perspectives
        3. Historical Parameters of Global-Era Genocide
        4. Reasons Not To Be Cheerful
        5. Policies and Politics of Genocide Prevention
        6. Limitations of Global Genocide Policy
        7. References
      4. Chapter 9 Transnational Crime
        1. Transnational Groups and Enterprises
        2. Networks of Gangs and Cartels
        3. A Global TCO Sampler: AfPak, Mexico, Central America, and West Africa
        4. Violent Non-State Actors, Statemaking, and State Reconfiguration
        5. Conclusion: Illicit Networks of Crime and Disorder
        6. References
        7. Further Reading
      5. Chapter 10 Natural Resources and Insecurity
        1. Introduction
        2. Cross-Country Empirical Studies: Are Resources and Civil War Related?
        3. Theoretical Models and Mechanisms: the “How” of this Relationship
        4. More Empirics: Which Mechanism(s) do the Data Support?
        5. Conclusion and Policy Implications
        6. Note
        7. References
      6. Chapter 11 The Web of Water Security
        1. Not Water Secure
        2. Why Narrow and Deterministic is not Good Enough
        3. The “Web” of Water Security
        4. Interdependency and Sustainable Water Security
        5. Analytical and Policy Implications of the “Web” of Water Security
        6. Conclusions
        7. Acknowledgements
        8. Notes
        9. References
        10. Further Reading
    5. Part III Policy Tools
      1. Chapter 12 Civilian Protection
        1. Introduction
        2. Civilian Protection as Acts of Omission: Avoiding Civilian Harm in Armed Conflict
        3. Peacekeeping and the Protection of Civilians
        4. Strategies of Civilian Protection and R2P
        5. Conclusion
        6. Acknowledgements
        7. Notes
        8. References
        9. Further Reading
      2. Chapter 13 Humanitarian Assistance
        1. Introduction
        2. Humanitarianism, Security, and Politics
        3. Securing Humanitarian Space
        4. Conclusion: Humanitarian (In)coherence, or Humanitarian Purity?
        5. References
      3. Chapter 14 The Evolution of International Peacekeeping
        1. Introduction
        2. The Evolution of International Peacekeeping
        3. Current Implementation Challenges
        4. Rethinking International Peacekeeping?
        5. Notes
        6. References
      4. Chapter 15 State-Building, Nation-Building, and Reconstruction
        1. Introduction
        2. Definitions
        3. (Post-)Liberal and Critical Framings
        4. Dilemmas and Contradictions
        5. New Emerging Alternatives: Hybrid and Post-Liberal Peace, the “Local”, the “Everyday”, and Beyond
        6. Conclusion
        7. References
      5. Chapter 16 Strengthening Democratic Governance in the Security Sector: The Unfulfilled Promise of Security Sector Reform
        1. What is Security Sector Reform?
        2. The Evolution of the Security Sector Reform Concept
        3. The Challenges of Implementing the SSR Agenda
        4. Becoming More Effective: Giving More Attention to Process
        5. References
      6. Chapter 17 Diplomacy and Mediation
        1. The Post-Cold War Issues
        2. The Post-Cold War Actors
        3. Post-Cold War Trends
        4. Notes
        5. References
      7. Chapter 18 Global Security and International Law
        1. A Conceptual Introduction
        2. Global Security, Use of Force, and International Law
        3. Climate Change and Other Global Challenges
        4. Concluding Comment
        5. Notes
        6. References
      8. Chapter 19 Transitional Justice
        1. Introduction
        2. The Evolution of Transitional Justice
        3. The Justice Dilemma and its Critics
        4. Beyond the State: Challenges for Scholars and Policymakers
        5. Conclusion
        6. References
    6. Part IV Global Security Actors
      1. Chapter 20 Reframing the Use of Force: The European Union as a Security Actor
        1. Introduction
        2. Integrated Security
        3. Norms and Values
        4. European Security Capabilities
        5. Conclusion
        6. Notes
        7. References
      2. Chapter 21 China
        1. Introduction
        2. Part I
        3. Part II: China's Role in Global Security
        4. Conclusion
        5. References
      3. Chapter 22 India as a Global Security Actor
        1. Introduction
        2. India's Worldview
        3. India as a Global Security Actor
        4. Challenges and Opportunities
        5. Conclusion: India's Emerging Global Profile
        6. Notes
        7. References
      4. Chapter 23 Security Agenda in Russia: Academic Concepts, Political Discourses, and Institutional Practices
        1. Introduction
        2. Methodological Remarks
        3. Security for Domestic Audience: a Genealogy of Russian Fears
        4. Russia's Visions of International Security: the Challenges of Legitimation
        5. Russia's Security Roles
        6. Conclusion
        7. Notes
        8. References
      5. Chapter 24 Contextualizing Global Security: The Case of Turkey
        1. Introduction
        2. Becoming a Global Security Actor
        3. Continuity and Change in Turkey's Security-Policies
        4. Lingering Questions
        5. Notes
        6. References
      6. Chapter 25 The United States
        1. Introduction
        2. The Context for Policy: Managing Decline or Reasserting Hegemony?
        3. Policy Priorities for the United States
        4. Reconfiguring Counterterrorism
        5. Conclusion
        6. References
      7. Chapter 26 Civil Society in Fragile Contexts<sup xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">1</sup>
        1. Introduction
        2. Strengthening Civil Society, What Is It All About?
        3. Hybrid Providers of Development in “Fragile States”<sup xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">5</sup>
        4. Agents of Peace and Democratization?
        5. Legitimacy and “Civilness”
        6. Global Connections and Difficulties of Outside Support
        7. Case Study – Strengthening “Agents of Change” in Ituri<sup xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">7</sup>
        8. Identifying Peace-Minded Partners
        9. Conclusion
        10. Notes
        11. References
      8. Chapter 27 Protest and Politics: How Peace Movements Shape History
        1. A Global Context
        2. Opposing War in Indochina
        3. Blocking Escalation
        4. Seeds of Watergate
        5. Defunding the War
        6. Campaigning for Disarmament
        7. Resisting the Iraq War
        8. Understanding Change
        9. Notes
        10. References
      9. Chapter 28 Corporate Actors
        1. Introduction
        2. Outlining the Rise of the PSI
        3. Security Privatization: Historical Roots
        4. The Post-Cold War Spurt
        5. Categorization of PMSCs
        6. Major Activities and involvement
        7. Protecting the Neoliberal Agenda
        8. Problems Related to Monitoring and Regulation
        9. Quest for Legitimacy
        10. Conclusion
        11. Notes
        12. References
    7. Index
    8. End User License Agreement