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The Future of Looking Back

Book Description

Get an inside look at Microsoft researcher Richard Banks’s thinking about the extension of our most human rites—remembering, reminiscing, reflecting, and honoring—from the physical to the digital and the future of our digital artifacts and content.

Table of Contents

  1. The Future of Looking Back
  2. Dedication
  3. Foreword
  4. Introduction
    1. Digital histories
    2. The lens of a designer
    3. Acknowledgments
  5. I. Stuff and sentimentality
    1. 1. Getting sentimental
      1. Keeping things safe
      2. Keeping things for ourselves
      3. Keeping things for an audience
      4. Keeping things for legacy
      5. A sense of obligation
      6. Sentiment, not archaeology
      7. Unexpectedly sentimental
      8. Family heirlooms
      9. A sentimental point of view
      10. Heirlooms with function
      11. Adding your own layer of sentiment
      12. Design challenges
    2. 2. Attributes of the physical and the digital
      1. What’s good about the physical?
      2. What’s good about the digital?
      3. Design challenges
    3. 3. Where the physical and the digital meet
      1. Bringing the physical and digital closer together
        1. Digital containers
        2. Making digital content part of our environment
      2. A history of stories
      3. Exchanging state
      4. Design challenges
  6. II. A digital life
    1. 4. Our digital lifespan
      1. Infants
        1. Recording a life
        2. A process of self-reflection
        3. Celebrating through recording
        4. Passing on experiences
      2. Growing up
        1. Social centers and personal space
        2. Taking on the responsibility of recording
        3. Taking technology for granted
        4. Sentimental adolescence
      3. Adults
        1. Changing phases
        2. Sharing history
      4. Seniors
        1. Emptying the nest
        2. Reflecting on life
      5. Design challenges
    2. 5. A digital death
      1. A part of due process
      2. Nonmaterial legacies
      3. Grieving
      4. Honoring the dead
      5. A continuity of relationship
      6. Design challenges
  7. III. New sentimental things
    1. 6. Things and experiences
      1. Capturing places
        1. Preserving physical spaces
        2. Preserving virtual places
      2. Capturing things
        1. Capturing things to let them go
        2. Physical experiences of digital things
      3. Capturing people
      4. Design challenges
    2. 7. Recording our lives
      1. Logging our lives
      2. Playing on the senses
        1. Audio
        2. Some other senses
      3. A spontaneous relationship to the past
      4. Design challenges
    3. 8. The things we put online
      1. Things live all over the place
      2. Not places for life
      3. Changing notions of the public and private
      4. Looking forward
        1. Backing up
        2. Making connections between places
        3. Content mobility
        4. Centralizing our estate
      5. Design challenges
  8. A. Afterword
  9. B. References
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 7
    7. Chapter 8
  10. Index
  11. About the Author
  12. Copyright