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The Discipline of Organizing: Core Concepts Edition, 3rd Edition by Robert J. Glushko

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11.5. Organizing a Kitchen

By Emilie Hardman, April 2013.

Overview. Just about everyone has a kitchen in their home or apartment, and most kitchens contain many of the same resources. These include pots and pans, dishes, bowls, drinking glasses, silverware, and cooking tools of various kinds. Kitchens are also often the location for organizing food items, cooking ingredients, spices, wine, and other beverages. Kitchens also invariably contain refrigerators and freezers for storing prepared and preserved food.

The organizing system for a kitchen is highly influenced by the size, shape, and arrangement of the counters, cabinets, shelves, and other parts of the physical environment of the kitchen. A person building a new home might be able to design this kitchen environment, but most people treat this as a given and work within its affordances, often because there are limits to how much the physical environment can be easily changed.

What is being organized? Our wine, wine glasses, cocktail glasses and ingredients, as well as tea and coffee stuff were stored in the cabinet by the fridge, close to the center worktable so people could have easy access to them. Because of space limitations, this meant that our water ...

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