You are previewing The Crowdfunding Revolution: How to Raise Venture Capital Using Social Media.

The Crowdfunding Revolution: How to Raise Venture Capital Using Social Media

  1. Cover Page
  2. The Crowdfunding Revolution: How to Raise Venture Capital Using Social Media
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Dedication
  5. Contents
  6. Introduction
  7. Part | I The Road Here
    1. Chapter | 1 The Rise of the Crowd
      1. The Dynamic Duo: Social and Physical Technologies
      2. Affinity Groups
      3. Participation and the New Pro-sumer Class
      4. The Response to the Loss of Social Capital
      5. The New Crowd-ployment Paradigm
      6. The Crowd-poration
    2. Chapter | 2 The Decline of Established Financing
      1. The Rate of Change
      2. The Durability of Expertise
      3. A Multidisciplinary World
      4. Market Time Compression
      5. Capital Efficiency and the Rolling Close
      6. Macroeconomic Sensitivity
      7. The Start-Ups’ Response
      8. The Venture Capital Industry’s Response
      9. The Market Sizing Fallacy
      10. The Base of the Funding Pyramid
    3. Chapter | 3 The Decline of Outlier Identification
      1. Curation: The New Leadership
    4. Chapter | 4 The Emergence of Early Financing
    5. Chapter | 5 The Rise of Crowdfunding
      1. At the Edge of Chaos
      2. Do It With Others (DIWO)
      3. Critical Mass
      4. The New Ritual, the New Status
      5. Rivers Without Cascades
      6. Valuations
      7. Long Tails and Shrinking Heads
      8. Gender Equalization
  8. Part | II The Crowdfunding Campaign
    1. Chapter | 6 Benefits
      1. Money
      2. Marketing
      3. Participation and Emotional Attachment
      4. Currying Serendipity
      5. Returns, Rewards, and Perks
    2. Chapter | 7 The Artful Ask
      1. Authenticity: Keeping It Real
      2. Impact and Appeal
      3. The Team
      4. Clear Goals
      5. Starting Fires with Influencers and Core Fans
      6. Rewards and Perks
    3. Chapter | 8 The Journey
      1. Follow Inspiration with Massive Action
      2. Drive Traffic with Social Networking
      3. Motivate Your Network: Keep Them Involved
  9. Part | III The Road Ahead
    1. Chapter | 9 Infrastructure and Ecosystems
      1. The Power of Virtual Infrastructure
      2. The Ecosystem
      3. The Power of Tags
      4. Integration and Evolution in the Ecosystem
      5. When Dartboards Are Better Than Groupthink
      6. Funding the Way the Market Wants It
      7. Solving the Hoarding Dilemma
      8. Kicking It Downstream
      9. Intellectual Property Entanglements
    2. Chapter | 10 Prediction Markets and Mining the Collective IQ
      1. Diversity Matters
      2. The Performance-tocracy
      3. What’s an Expert?
      4. Trendspotting
      5. The Market Is the New Seniority
      6. Prediction Markets Commoditized
    3. Chapter | 11 The Intersection with Crowdsourcing
      1. No Network, No Funding
      2. Crowdfunding Crowdsourced Ideas
      3. The Crowdfunding and Crowdsourcing Nexus
    4. Chapter | 12 The New Investment Models
      1. Venture Capital Meets Crowd Capital
      2. Incubators and the Crowd
      3. Crowd Capital Meets Crowd Capital
      4. Donations First, Investments Later
      5. Here Comes Wall Street
      6. A New Capital Allocation Mechanism
      7. At the Community Level
      8. Grants and the Arts
      9. Reinvigorating the Community
      10. The Virtual Tech Hub
    5. Chapter | 13 Regulation and Policy Status
      1. The Current State of Affairs
      2. United States
      3. Europe
      4. International
    6. Chapter | 14 Regulation and Policy Directions
      1. Pray for Much Failure
      2. Taxes, Taxes, Taxes
      3. Patents and Crowdfunding Platforms
      4. The IP Landscape
      5. The Velocity of Innovation and the Effects of the IP System
      6. A Perpetual Motion Machine of Innovation
  10. Epilogue
  11. Notes
  12. Acknowledgments
  13. About the Authors
  14. Index
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Chapter | 1THE RISE OF THE CROWD

If Facebook were a country, it would be the 3rd most populated.

—TechXav

The Group of Seven (G-7), an international organization established to facilitate economic cooperation, dates back to the member nations’ summit meetings circa 1975, but it was officially established in 1985, not that long before the commercialized Internet was born.1 In the ensuing decades after its establishment, a lot has happened on the global economic scene, including the expansion of the group to become the G-20, representing 20 of the world’s major economies. But another important trend, at least as profound, has been growing: the number of Internet users in the world has grown to over 2 billion, out of a total population of 7 billion. ...

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