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The Complete Guide to Knowledge Management: A Strategic Plan to Leverage Your Company's Intellectual Capital

Book Description

A straightforward guide to leveraging your company's intellectual capital by creating a knowledge management culture

The Complete Guide to Knowledge Management offers managers the tools they need to create an organizational culture that improves knowledge sharing, reuse, learning, collaboration, and innovation to ensure mesurable growth. Written by internationally recognized knowledge management pioneers, it addresses all those topics in knowledge management that a manager needs to ensure organizational success.

  • Provides plenty of real-life examples and case studies

  • Includes interviews with prominent managers who have successfully implemented knowledge management structures within their organizations

  • Offers chapters composed of short theoretical explanations and practical methods that you can utilize, based primarily on hands-on author experience

Taking an intellectual journey into knowledge management, beginning with an understanding of the concept of intellectual capital and how to establish an appropriate culture, this book looks at the human aspects of managing knowledge workers, promoting interactions for knowledge creation and sharing.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Acknowledgments
  3. Preface: Getting Started on Your Knowledge Management Journey
    1. A Book for Managers
    2. Introducing the Authors
    3. How This Book Is Organized
      1. Phase 1: Hitting the Road
      2. Phase 2: Prerequisites
      3. Phase 3: Viewpoints of Knowledge
      4. Phase 4: Innovating for a New Beginning
    4. Notes on Style
      1. Referencing the Authors and Sources
      2. Definition of Knowledge and Intellectual Capital
    5. Conclusion
  4. 1. The Motivation toward Knowledge Management: Combining the Tactical with the Strategic
    1. 1.1. A Manager Struggling with Key Tactical Problems
    2. 1.2. A Consultant Struggling with Key Strategic Problems
      1. 1.2.1. Convincing Managers about the Importance of Strategic KM
    3. 1.3. A Convergence of Paths
      1. 1.3.1. Tuvya's Questions Are Typical Tactical KM Issues
      2. 1.3.2. KM Has Important Strategic Implications
      3. 1.3.3. We Would Like to Join Forces in Search of Answers
    4. 1.4. Discovering Universal KM Truths
      1. 1.4.1. The Answers Are Important
      2. 1.4.2. The Answers Are Diverse
      3. 1.4.3. Some Answers Can Be Found Close to Home
      4. 1.4.4. The Manager Must Lead
    5. 1.5. Conclusion
  5. 2. Making the Business Case for Managing Intellectual Capital
    1. 2.1. Intellectual Capital as the Basic Asset of a Knowledge-Intensive Business
      1. 2.1.1. Example: AFS, a Skandia Subsidiary—A Company in the Red Gets a Green Light
      2. 2.1.2. Example: An Israeli Machinery Firm—A Company in the Green Gets a Red Light
      3. 2.1.3. Example: Tnuva—Apax Invests in IC in a Traditional Industry
    2. 2.2. A Quantitative Definition of Intellectual Capital
      1. 2.2.1. A (Very) Simplified Estimation
        1. 2.2.1.1. THE LIMITATIONS OF THE SIMPLIFIED ESTIMATION
      2. 2.2.2. Baruch Lev's Method
    3. 2.3. The Systematic Management of IC
      1. 2.3.1. The Skandia Navigator
        1. 2.3.1.1. PAST PERFORMANCE
        2. 2.3.1.2. PRESENT STATUS
        3. 2.3.1.3. FUTURE RESULTS
      2. 2.3.2. Managing IC Using the Navigator
      3. 2.3.3. The Balanced Scorecard (BSC)
    4. 2.4. Questions for Believers and Nonbelievers
    5. 2.5. Conclusion
  6. 3. The Importance of Strategy in Knowledge Management
    1. 3.1. Developing a Business Strategy Based on Core Competencies
    2. 3.2. What Is at the Core of Strategic Management?
      1. 3.2.1. The Goal: Staying Ahead of the Game
      2. 3.2.2. The Process: Managing Knowledge
      3. 3.2.3. The Failure of KM without Strategy
      4. 3.2.4. How KM Serves the Overall Business Strategy
        1. 3.2.4.1. FINDING VALUE FROM INTANGIBLES
    3. 3.3. Successfully Using Employee Knowledge as a Strategic Input
      1. 3.3.1. The Demand: Evaluating Strengths and Weaknesses
      2. 3.3.2. The Tool: Effective Communication
        1. 3.3.2.1. EXAMPLE OF A KNOWLEDGE CAFÉ: LEARNING IN RETROSPECT AT ARKIA
    4. 3.4. Example: IBM—Ongoing Strategic Renewal
      1. 3.4.1. Technological Innovation
      2. 3.4.2. Business Management Innovation
    5. 3.5. Example: Rafael—A Strategic Transformation
    6. 3.6. Conclusion
  7. 4. The Role of Culture in a Successful Knowledge-Creating and Knowledge-Sharing Organization
    1. 4.1. The Definition of Culture
      1. 4.1.1. Addressing the Nonbelievers
    2. 4.2. The Moral Aspects of Organizational Culture
    3. 4.3. The Practical Aspects of the Right Organizational Culture
      1. 4.3.1. Does Your Management Style Seek an Employee's Knowledge?
      2. 4.3.2. Do You Encourage Knowledge Sharing?
        1. 4.3.2.1. EXAMPLE: THE KNOWLEDGE-SHARING CULTURE AT BP AMOCO
        2. 4.3.2.2. EXAMPLE: THE KNOWLEDGE-SHARING CULTURE AT RAFAEL
      3. 4.3.3. Making Innovation Inherent to Your Organization's Culture
      4. 4.3.4. Trust and a Win-Win Environment
      5. 4.3.5. Tailoring Values to the Company's Knowledge Needs
    4. 4.4. From Preaching to Practice
      1. 4.4.1. Awareness and Active Listening
    5. 4.5. Conclusion
  8. 5. The Human Focus: Understanding and Managing Knowledge Workers
    1. 5.1. Is Every Worker a Knowledge Worker?
      1. 5.1.1. The Most Common View: Only Knowledge-Creating and Nonroutine Workers are Knowledge Workers
      2. 5.1.2. Tuvya's View: Almost Every Worker Is a Knowledge Worker
      3. 5.1.3. Knowledge Is in the Eye of the Beholder
    2. 5.2. Shaking Up the Balance of Power: Lessons from the First Bubble Crisis
      1. 5.2.1. Lesson 1: The Breach of Trust
        1. 5.2.1.1. LESSON 2: THE IMPORTANCE AND MOBILITY OF KNOWLEDGE WORKERS
      2. 5.2.2. The Aftermath
    3. 5.3. Lessons from the Second Bubble Crisis
      1. 5.3.1. Lesson 1: Retain Your Leading KWs
      2. 5.3.2. Lesson 2: Recruit More Leading KWs
      3. 5.3.3. The Aftermath
    4. 5.4. The Challenge of Retention
      1. 5.4.1. Retention Tactics
      2. 5.4.2. Is Salary a Main Factor?
      3. 5.4.3. Keeping KWs Interested Throughout Their Career
        1. 5.4.3.1. MAKE EVERY ASSIGNMENT INTERESTING OR MEANINGFUL
        2. 5.4.3.2. CREATE AND MAINTAIN A FULL KNOWLEDGE MATRIX
      4. 5.4.4. Show Interest in Your Knowledge Workers
        1. 5.4.4.1. REGULAR MEETINGS WITH KNOWLEDGE WORKERS
        2. 5.4.4.2. SPECIAL CARE OF STAR WORKERS
    5. 5.5. Keeping in Touch with Knowledge Workers Who Leave
      1. 5.5.1. Retiring Knowledge Workers
      2. 5.5.2. Alumni Networks
    6. 5.6. Rewarding Knowledge Creation and Sharing
      1. 5.6.1. Example: The Academia Way
      2. 5.6.2. Types of Compensation
    7. 5.7. Conclusion
  9. 6. Managing Interactions for Knowledge Creation and Sharing
    1. 6.1. The Social Model for Knowledge Creation and Sharing
      1. 6.1.1. Tacit Knowledge
      2. 6.1.2. Communities of Practice—the Basic Instrument of Knowledge Creation and Sharing
      3. 6.1.3. Balancing Interactions with Individual Work
    2. 6.2. Extracting Tacit Knowledge—the Corporate Yellow Pages
    3. 6.3. Enhancing Interactions in Communities of Practice
      1. 6.3.1. Cake Meetings—Food for Thought for a Section of Knowledge Workers
      2. 6.3.2. Cakeless Meetings for Managers
    4. 6.4. Identifying and Enhancing CoPs
      1. 6.4.1. Can CoPs be Managed? Lessons Learned at National Semiconductor
      2. 6.4.2. Preventing Common Problems with CoPs
    5. 6.5. Indispensable Knowledge-Creating and Knowledge-Sharing Interactions
      1. 6.5.1. After-Action Review
      2. 6.5.2. Peer Reviews
        1. 6.5.2.1. EXTERNAL DESIGN REVIEWS IN ENGINEERING PROJECTS
        2. 6.5.2.2. INTERNAL DESIGN REVIEWS IN ENGINEERING PROJECTS
      3. 6.5.3. Peer Reviews in Other Organizations
    6. 6.6. Methods and Techniques for Effective Interactions
      1. 6.6.1. Facilitation of Meetings
      2. 6.6.2. The Physical Environment
      3. 6.6.3. The Knowledge Café
        1. 6.6.3.1. CAFÉ CONVERSATIONS AT A GLANCE
    7. 6.7. Making the Most of Information Technology
    8. 6.8. Conclusion
  10. 7. Capturing and Reusing Existing Knowledge
    1. 7.1. Motivation and Obstacles
    2. 7.2. Documenting Knowledge Efficiently
      1. 7.2.1. Example: The Pharmaceutical Industry
      2. 7.2.2. Example: The Aerospace Industry
      3. 7.2.3. IT—Has the Future Already Arrived?
    3. 7.3. Teaching the Organization What It Knows
      1. 7.3.1. Mentoring and Apprenticeships
        1. 7.3.1.1. LEARNING THROUGH EXPERIENCE
        2. 7.3.1.2. A BALANCE OF ATTENTION IS KEY TO QUALITY MENTORING
      2. 7.3.2. Lectures and Workshops
        1. 7.3.2.1. HOW TO MAKE A LECTURE OR WORKSHOP SUCCEED
        2. 7.3.2.2. THE ALTERNATIVE APPROACH
      3. 7.3.3. Courses
      4. 7.3.4. Internal Schools for Continuing Education
    4. 7.4. Reuse and New Use
      1. 7.4.1. Example: Reuse at Hughes
      2. 7.4.2. Example: New Use at Intel
    5. 7.5. Conclusion
  11. 8. The Customer Focus: Harnessing Customer Knowledge through Meaningful Interactions
    1. 8.1. Customers Are Willing to Share What They Know
      1. 8.1.1. Surveys versus Direct Communication
    2. 8.2. The Living Lab Concept
    3. 8.3. Learning from Internal Customers
    4. 8.4. Engaging Customers in Defining Strategy
    5. 8.5. Conclusion
  12. 9. Measuring and Managing the Performance of Proper Knowledge Work
    1. 9.1. The Challenge: Determining What You Need
      1. 9.1.1. Assessing Assets
      2. 9.1.2. Frustrating Conclusion? Not Yet!
    2. 9.2. Current Practices: Knowing What You Have
      1. 9.2.1. Focusing on R&D to Gain Improvements
      2. 9.2.2. Focusing on Process to Gain Improvements
      3. 9.2.3. Focusing on Customers to Gain Improvements
      4. 9.2.4. Focusing on Human Resources to Gain Improvements
      5. 9.2.5. Focusing on the Bottom Line to Gain Improvements
    3. 9.3. The Navigator: A Framework for IC Management
      1. 9.3.1. Using the Navigator to Assess the IC of Skandia AFS
        1. 9.3.1.1. SKANDIA AFS'S BALANCE SHEET
        2. 9.3.1.2. HOW DOES THE NAVIGATOR WORK?
        3. 9.3.1.3. CONCLUSION ON SKANDIA'S EXPERIENCE
      2. 9.3.2. Using the Navigator to Assess the IC of a Country
        1. 9.3.2.1. INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL INDICATORS IN SWEDEN
        2. 9.3.2.2. INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL INDICATORS IN ISRAEL
        3. 9.3.2.3. CONCLUSION ON THE NATIONAL IC EXAMPLES
      3. 9.3.3. Using the Navigator to Visualize and Increase IC of an Old Industry Corporation
      4. 9.3.4. Using the Navigator to Assess the IC of a Nonprofit Unit at Rafael
        1. 9.3.4.1. STRATEGY
        2. 9.3.4.2. BOTTOM-LINE INDICATORS
        3. 9.3.4.3. INDICATORS FOR THE OTHER NAVIGATOR FOCUS AREAS
      5. 9.3.5. A Final Note on the Navigator as a Universal Framework
    4. 9.4. Conclusion
  13. 10. Innovating for a New Beginning
    1. 10.1. Innovation as the Essence of Knowledge Organizations
      1. 10.1.1. Apple Inc.
      2. 10.1.2. Intel Corporation
      3. 10.1.3. Rafael
      4. 10.1.4. Israel
    2. 10.2. Knowledge Management as an Innovation Enabler
      1. 10.2.1. Defining Innovation
      2. 10.2.2. The Second Generation of Knowledge Management Is Innovation
    3. 10.3. Focal Points of Innovation
      1. 10.3.1. Innovation and R&D
      2. 10.3.2. Innovation and Process
        1. 10.3.2.1. EXAMPLE: ELBIT—INNOVATION USING CONTINUOUS ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES
        2. 10.3.2.2. EXAMPLE: WAL-MART'S SUPPLY CHAIN
      3. 10.3.3. Innovation and Customers
    4. 10.4. Methods for Enabling Innovation
      1. 10.4.1. Making Innovation a Requirement
      2. 10.4.2. Fostering Strategic Discussions on Innovation
        1. 10.4.2.1. INNOVATION REQUIRES FREQUENT DISCUSSIONS
        2. 10.4.2.2. INNOVATION REQUIRES MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES
        3. 10.4.2.3. EXAMPLE: R&D CENTER ANNUAL WORKSHOP
      3. 10.4.3. Tangible Encouragement of Individual Innovation
    5. 10.5. Conclusion
  14. CONCLUSION: Implementing Knowledge Management—A Step-by-Step Process
    1. The Basic Principles
    2. How to Do It
      1. The Vision
      2. Assess Your Organization
      3. Derive Intellectual Capital Goals
      4. Begin with Pilots
      5. Start Small
    3. Who Should Do It
      1. The Initiator
      2. Chief Knowledge Officers
      3. Consultants
    4. The Final Goal
  15. A. Defining Key Terms
    1. A.1. Levels of Knowledge
      1. A.1.1. Data and Information
      2. A.1.2. Knowledge
      3. A.1.3. Intellectual Capital and Wisdom
    2. A.2. Conclusion
  16. Notes
    1. Chapter 1—The Motivation toward Knowledge Management
    2. Chapter 2—Making the Business Case for Managing Intellectual Capital
    3. Chapter 3—The Importance of Strategy in Knowledge Management
    4. Chapter 4—The Role of Culture in a Successful Knowledge-Creating and Knowledge-Sharing Organization
    5. Chapter 5—The Human Focus
    6. Chapter 6—Managing Interactions for Knowledge Creation and Sharing
    7. Chapter 7—Capturing and Reusing Knowledge
    8. Chapter 8—The Customer Focus
    9. Chapter 9—Measuring and Managing the Performance of Proper Knowledge Work
    10. Chapter 10—Innovating for a New Beginning