You are previewing The Complete Guide to CICS Transaction Gateway Volume 1 Configuration and Administration.
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The Complete Guide to CICS Transaction Gateway Volume 1 Configuration and Administration

Book Description

In this IBM® Redbooks® publication, you will gain an appreciation of the IBM CICS® Transaction Gateway (CICS TG) product suite, based on key criteria, such as capabilities, scalability, platform, CICS server support, application language support, and licensing model.

Matching the requirements to available infrastructure and hardware choices requires an appreciation of the choices available. In this book, you will gain an understanding of those choices, and will be capable of choosing the appropriate CICS connection protocol, APIs for the applications, and security options. You will understand the services available to the application developer when using a chosen protocol.

You will then learn about how to implement CICS TG solutions, taking advantage of the latest capabilities, such as IPIC connectivity, high availability, and Dynamic Server Selection. Specific scenarios illustrate the usage of CICS TG for IBM z/OS®, and CICS TG for Multiplatforms, with CICS Transaction Server for z/OS and IBM WebSphere® Application Server, including connections in CICS, configuring simple end-to-end connectivity (all platforms) with verification for remote and local mode applications, and adding security, XA support, and high availability.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Part 1 Introduction
  5. Chapter 1. Basic concepts
    1. 1.1 Overview of the CICS TG products
      1. 1.1.1 More you must know about IBM CICS Transaction Gateway
      2. 1.1.2 Business value
      3. 1.1.3 Solution overview
      4. 1.1.4 Solution architecture
      5. 1.1.5 Usage scenarios
      6. 1.1.6 Integration
      7. 1.1.7 Supported platforms
    2. 1.2 Connectivity and capability by CICS TG product
    3. 1.3 CICS TG topologies
      1. 1.3.1 Three-tier solutions
      2. 1.3.2 Two-tier solutions
      3. 1.3.3 CICS TG for z/OS
      4. 1.3.4 CICS TG for Multiplatforms
      5. 1.3.5 CICS TG Desktop Edition
    4. 1.4 High availability features
      1. 1.4.1 Connection balancing
      2. 1.4.2 Dynamic Server Selection
    5. 1.5 Transactionality
      1. 1.5.1 Sync-on-return
      2. 1.5.2 Distributed Transaction Processing
    6. 1.6 Security
  6. Chapter 2. CICS Transaction Gateway for z/OS installations
    1. 2.1 Installing CICS TG for z/OS
      1. 2.1.1 Ordering CICS TG from Shopz
    2. 2.2 Anatomy of CICS TG for z/OS
    3. 2.3 CICS TG basic structure
      1. 2.3.1 Gateway daemon
    4. 2.4 Adding facilities to CICS TG
      1. 2.4.1 Automatic restart of a CICS TG region
      2. 2.4.2 Using EXCI to communicate with CICS TS
      3. 2.4.3 Clients passing a large amount of data to the CICS TS application
      4. 2.4.4 Client applications needing transactionality over EXCI
      5. 2.4.5 Client applications needing distributed LUWs
      6. 2.4.6 Using historical statistical data analysis
      7. 2.4.7 Using real-time statistical data analysis
      8. 2.4.8 Multiple Gateway daemons started on the same LPAR
      9. 2.4.9 Security
      10. 2.4.10 Setting up high availability
    5. 2.5 The benefits of CICS TG for z/OS
  7. Chapter 3. CICS Transaction Gateway for Multiplatforms and Desktop Edition installations
    1. 3.1 Preparing to install CICS TG Multiplatforms and CICS TG Desktop Edition in a distributed environment
      1. 3.1.1 The Passport Advantage site
      2. 3.1.2 Files provided within the installable eImage
    2. 3.2 Anatomy of CICS TG in a Windows environment
    3. 3.3 Anatomy of CICS TG on UNIX
    4. 3.4 The CICS TG and Client daemons and runtime components
      1. 3.4.1 The Client daemon
      2. 3.4.2 The Gateway daemon
      3. 3.4.3 The IPIC protocol
      4. 3.4.4 The configuration tool
      5. 3.4.5 Resource adapters
  8. Part 2 CICS Transaction Gateway capabilities
  9. Chapter 4. Connecting to CICS
    1. 4.1 CICS communication protocols
      1. 4.1.1 What’s in a name?
      2. 4.1.2 IP interconnectivity (IPIC)
      3. 4.1.3 EXCI
      4. 4.1.4 TCPIP
      5. 4.1.5 SNA Advanced Program-to-Program Communication (APPC)
    2. 4.2 CICS TG APIs and connection type
    3. 4.3 Quality of service and connection types
      1. 4.3.1 IPIC
      2. 4.3.2 EXCI
      3. 4.3.3 TCPIP
      4. 4.3.4 SNA
    4. 4.4 IPIC autoinstall for WebSphere Application Server clusters
  10. Chapter 5. Understanding the Gateway daemon
    1. 5.1 Three-tier concepts
    2. 5.2 Gateway daemon resources
      1. 5.2.1 Protocol handlers
      2. 5.2.2 The threading model
      3. 5.2.3 Estimating the number of connection manager threads
      4. 5.2.4 Estimating the number of worker threads
    3. 5.3 Connecting to CICS servers
      1. 5.3.1 All platforms: IPIC
      2. 5.3.2 Multiplatform and Desktop Edition specific: TCPIP
      3. 5.3.3 Multiplatform and Desktop Edition specific: SNA
      4. 5.3.4 z/OS specific: EXCI
    4. 5.4 System resources
      1. 5.4.1 Gateway daemon runtime environment
      2. 5.4.2 Information available at run time
      3. 5.4.3 Gateway daemon memory requirements
    5. 5.5 z/OS specific resources
      1. 5.5.1 Region size consideration in CICS TG for z/OS
      2. 5.5.2 Storage and EXCI in the Gateway daemon for z/OS
      3. 5.5.3 Using a 64-bit Gateway daemon on z/OS
    6. 5.6 z/OS Workload Manager suggestions for CICS TG for z/OS
      1. 5.6.1 WLM system-provided special service classes
      2. 5.6.2 Storage Critical option
      3. 5.6.3 MAXCPUTIME
    7. 5.7 Statistics
  11. Chapter 6. CICS Transaction Gateway solution options
    1. 6.1 Deployment topologies
      1. 6.1.1 Remote mode
      2. 6.1.2 Local mode
    2. 6.2 CICS TG APIs and connection type
      1. 6.2.1 JCA client applications
      2. 6.2.2 Base class Java applications
      3. 6.2.3 Microsoft .NET framework-based applications
      4. 6.2.4 ECIv2 and ESIv2 applications
      5. 6.2.5 ECI, ESI, and EPI v1 applications
    3. 6.3 Transactional models
      1. 6.3.1 Two-phase commit
      2. 6.3.2 JCA and transactions
    4. 6.4 Choosing a Gateway topology
  12. Chapter 7. High availability concepts
    1. 7.1 High availability overview
    2. 7.2 Connection balancing
      1. 7.2.1 Single point of failure: Single Gateway daemon
      2. 7.2.2 z/OS shared ports
      3. 7.2.3 Multiplatform IP load balancing solutions
    3. 7.3 Dynamic server selection
      1. 7.3.1 Default server
      2. 7.3.2 The CICS request exit
      3. 7.3.3 DSSPOLICY (z/OS only)
      4. 7.3.4 DFHXCURM (z/OS only)
      5. 7.3.5 Client API user exits
      6. 7.3.6 Client daemon Workload Manager on Windows
    4. 7.4 Importance of scaling and growing in a continuous availability system
    5. 7.5 Considerations for XA transaction support on z/OS
  13. Chapter 8. Security
    1. 8.1 Security basics
      1. 8.1.1 The components of a security system
      2. 8.1.2 The role of cryptography
    2. 8.2 Network security
      1. 8.2.1 Secure Sockets Layer and Transport Layer Security
      2. 8.2.2 Digital signatures, certificates, and key rings
      3. 8.2.3 Enabling SSL in the CICS TG
      4. 8.2.4 Securing IPIC connections
      5. 8.2.5 Securing connections to the Gateway daemon
    3. 8.3 Passwords, PassTickets, and password phrases
    4. 8.4 Identity propagation
    5. 8.5 The external security interface
  14. Part 3 Configuration
  15. Chapter 9. Configuring IPIC in CICS Transaction Gateway for z/OS
    1. 9.1 Configuration overview
    2. 9.2 CICS definitions for IPIC
      1. 9.2.1 System initialization parameters
      2. 9.2.2 The mirror transaction
      3. 9.2.3 TCPIPSERVICE resource definition
      4. 9.2.4 IPCONN resource definition
    3. 9.3 The sample application programs
      1. 9.3.1 Transferring, compiling, and linking the CICS sample programs
      2. 9.3.2 Defining and installing the CICS sample program
      3. 9.3.3 Data conversion for the COMMAREA samples
    4. 9.4 Securing IPIC with SSL
      1. 9.4.1 Create a key ring for CICS
      2. 9.4.2 The KEYRING system initialization parameter
      3. 9.4.3 Configure a TCPIPSERVICE for SSL
    5. 9.5 Configuring IPIC autoinstall for WebSphere Application Server clusters
  16. Chapter 10. CICS Transaction Gateway for z/OS configuration
    1. 10.1 Configure the Gateway daemon
      1. 10.1.1 Configuration summary
      2. 10.1.2 The CTGBATCH launcher
      3. 10.1.3 Configuration file
      4. 10.1.4 Environment variables
      5. 10.1.5 Overriding the configuration file
      6. 10.1.6 Started procedure and Gateway daemon user ID
    2. 10.2 Testing the Gateway daemon
      1. 10.2.1 Start the Gateway daemon
      2. 10.2.2 Test using the CTGTESTR job
    3. 10.3 Configure basic security
      1. 10.3.1 CICS TS configuration for USERAUTH(VERIFY)
      2. 10.3.2 Test using the CTGTESTR job
    4. 10.4 Configure secure connections
      1. 10.4.1 Secure the Gateway daemon
      2. 10.4.2 SSL application to Gateway daemon
      3. 10.4.3 SSL IPIC to CICS
      4. 10.4.4 Restricting cipher suites
    5. 10.5 Adding XA support
      1. 10.5.1 The CTGRRMS address space
      2. 10.5.2 System configuration for CTGRRMS
      3. 10.5.3 Gateway daemon configuration for XA transactions
      4. 10.5.4 Verifying the configuration for XA transactions
  17. Chapter 11. CICS Transaction Gateway Multiplatforms and Desktop Edition configuration
    1. 11.1 Installing CICS TG
      1. 11.1.1 Installing on a Windows platform
      2. 11.1.2 Installing on a UNIX (AIX) platform
    2. 11.2 Configure the Gateway daemon
      1. 11.2.1 System-level configuration
      2. 11.2.2 Gateway daemon configuration summary
      3. 11.2.3 The PRODUCT section
      4. 11.2.4 The GATEWAY section
      5. 11.2.5 The IPICSERVER section
    3. 11.3 Starting and stopping CICS TG
      1. 11.3.1 The Windows platform
      2. 11.3.2 The UNIX and Linux platforms
    4. 11.4 Testing the Gateway daemon
      1. 11.4.1 Start the Gateway daemon
      2. 11.4.2 Test the connection
      3. 11.4.3 Test the channel and container support
    5. 11.5 Configuring secure connections
      1. 11.5.1 Secure the Gateway daemon
      2. 11.5.2 Test the secure Gateway connection
      3. 11.5.3 Add client authentication
      4. 11.5.4 Secure the IPIC connection
    6. 11.6 Client daemon configuration
      1. 11.6.1 The CLIENT section
      2. 11.6.2 The DRIVER section
      3. 11.6.3 The SERVER section
      4. 11.6.4 The LOADMANAGER section (Windows)
  18. Chapter 12. Integrating with WebSphere Application Server
    1. 12.1 Java EE application servers supported by CICS TG
    2. 12.2 The CICS resource adapters
    3. 12.3 Topologies
    4. 12.4 WebSphere Application Server settings
      1. 12.4.1 Connection management
      2. 12.4.2 Transaction management
      3. 12.4.3 Security Management
      4. 12.4.4 WebSphere Application Server z/OS-specific settings for EXCI
    5. 12.5 Installing the ECI resource adapter
      1. 12.5.1 Install the ECI resource adapter
      2. 12.5.2 Upgrading the ECI resource adapter
    6. 12.6 Creating and configuring a Java EE Connector Architecture connection factory
      1. 12.6.1 Creating a Java EE Connector Architecture connection factory
      2. 12.6.2 Configuring the connection pool properties
      3. 12.6.3 Configuring a Java EE Connector Architecture connection factory for CICS TG local mode
      4. 12.6.4 Configuring a Java EE Connector Architecture connection factory for CICS TG remote mode
    7. 12.7 Testing end-to-end
      1. 12.7.1 Deploying and configuring the IVT
      2. 12.7.2 Running the IVT
    8. 12.8 Configuring the XA connection
    9. 12.9 Flowing the user ID and password on an ECI request
    10. 12.10 Securing the connection with Secure Sockets Layer
    11. 12.11 Transaction tracking with Cross Component Trace
  19. Chapter 13. High availability configuration
    1. 13.1 High availability use case
    2. 13.2 High availability topology
    3. 13.3 Connection balancing
      1. 13.3.1 Sysplex Distributor
      2. 13.3.2 Enabling WLM recommendations for TCP/IP port sharing
      3. 13.3.3 Testing TCP/IP port sharing using WLM
      4. 13.3.4 Modifying or deleting a TCPIP port sharing definition
    4. 13.4 Highly available Gateway group
    5. 13.5 Configuring DSSPOLICY
      1. 13.5.1 Policy based on dynamic server selection (z/OS only)
    6. 13.6 WebSphere Application Server cluster
      1. 13.6.1 WebSphere Application Server high availability topology
      2. 13.6.2 Using ECI resource adapter in a WebSphere Application Server cluster
      3. 13.6.3 Configuring a Java EE Connector Architecture connection factory for CICS TG remote mode
    7. 13.7 XA considerations
  20. Chapter 14. Explorer plug-in
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Installing CICS TG plug-in for CICS Explorer
    3. 14.3 Creating and administering z/OS Gateway daemons
      1. 14.3.1 Creating a z/OS Gateway daemon using z/OS Explorer
      2. 14.3.2 Starting and stopping a z/OS Gateway daemon
    4. 14.4 Preparing a Gateway daemon to use Explorer
    5. 14.5 Connecting to a Gateway daemon
      1. 14.5.1 Backing up and restoring connection definitions
    6. 14.6 Viewing information for a Gateway daemon
      1. 14.6.1 CICS TG Explorer view
      2. 14.6.2 Gateway daemons view
      3. 14.6.3 CICS connections view
  21. Chapter 15. Troubleshooting techniques
    1. 15.1 Troubleshooting z/OS installations
      1. 15.1.1 Obtaining CTGRRMS traced
    2. 15.2 Gateway daemon source of information
    3. 15.3 Gateway Daemon and Java shared class caches
      1. 15.3.1 Startup messages
      2. 15.3.2 Useful commands to display the shared class cache
  22. Part 4 Appendixes
  23. Appendix A. Running the precompiled Java sample EciB1 from batch on z/OS
    1. Use precompiled EciB1 from batch
    2. z/OS UNIX script
    3. Batch JOB CTGECIB1
    4. EciB1 command-line syntax
  24. Appendix B. Modifying the sample BasicCICSRequestExit
    1. B.1 Introduction to the CICS request exit samples
    2. B.2 Modify the sample CICS Request Exit
    3. B.3 Compile the Java sample request exit
    4. B.4 SupportPac CA1T
  25. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Online resources
    3. Help from IBM
  26. Back cover
  27. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  28. Notices
    1. Trademarks