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The Brand Challenge

Book Description

The Brand Challenge provides a comprehensive and topical examination of the application of branding across a variety of sectors including luxury goods, finance and not-for-profit; it proves essential reading for anyone involved in branding decisions or wanting to know more about the branding process. Edited by leading brand analyst Kartikeya Kompella, The Brand Challenge explains the nuances of building brands in different industries with a chapter devoted to each to give the reader the most up-to-date understanding of how to apply brand theory. It contains original contributions from many of the world's leading brand experts who lift the veil on brand building in their specific sector. The book encourages readers to apply practices from one category to another to foster innovation in brands and successful brand building. Contributing Authors: Al Ries (focus), Tony Allen (identity), Peter Fisk (innovation), Allen Adamson (brand), Professor Jean-No�l Kapferer (luxury), Jesko Perrey (retail), Thomas Meyer (retail), Simon Glynn (B2B), Michael D'Esopo (B2B), Professor Walter McDowell (TV), Mike Symes (finance), Jocelyne Daw (non-profit), Professor Joseph Hancock (fashion), Professor John O'Neill (hospitality), Jeremy Hildreth (city), JT Singh (city), Howard Breindel (technology), Sue Bridgewater (football)

Table of Contents

  1. Foreword
  2. Preface
  3. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">01</span>&#160;&#160;Focus: The future of your company depends on it  Focus: The future of your company depends on it
  4. Al Ries
  5. Focus versus positioning
  6. Focus on the brand
  7. Focus on the mind
  8. Focus on the market leader
  9. Focus on the short term
  10. Focus on the global market
  11. Focus on a single word
  12. Focus on a single visual
  13. Focus on multiple brands
  14. Focus your company
  15. Biography
  16. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">02</span>&#160;&#160;Identity: Don&#8217;t lose it  Identity: Don’t lose it
  17. Tony Allen
  18. The faces of identity
  19. How identity works
  20. Identity at the frontier
  21. Biography
  22. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">03</span>&#160;&#160;Brand innovation: Embracing change to innovate your brand and accelerate growth  Brand innovation: Embracing change to innovate your brand and accelerate growth
  23. Peter Fisk
  24. Brands in a changing world
  25. The power to change the world
  26. Step 1: Frame … innovating the brand purpose
  27. Step 2: Create … innovating the brand concept
  28. Step 3: Resonate … innovating the brand story
  29. Step 4: Cluster … innovating the brand solution
  30. Step 5: Enable … innovating the brand experience
  31. Step 6: Connect … innovating the brand relationship
  32. Step 7: Extend … innovating the brand range
  33. Step 8: Optimize … innovating the brand portfolio
  34. Step 9: Impact … innovating the brand value
  35. Biography
  36. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">04</span>&#160;&#160;Bridging the gap between brand idea and delivery in a move-faster-but-be-certain market: Why the traditional process of building a brand needs a reboot  Bridging the gap between brand idea and delivery in a move-faster-but-be-certain market: Why the traditional process of building a brand needs a reboot
  37. Allen Adamson
  38. Part one: Let’s set the foundation
  39. Part two: So, what’s the problem?
  40. Part three: So, what’s the solution?
  41. How does this prototyping process actually work?
  42. Why is the prototype process better than the traditional linear process?
  43. Biography
  44. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">05</span>&#160;&#160;Luxury branding  Luxury branding
  45. Jean-Noël Kapferer
  46. Luxury in question: Ending the confusion about definitions
  47. The luxury strategy
  48. Luxury is not a more expensive version of premium but a completely different mindset
  49. Building incomparability and value in the brand
  50. The importance of heritage
  51. Luxury does not lie in marketing but in the offering: The anti-laws of marketing
  52. Conclusion: To endure, luxury must learn from religion and art
  53. Biography
  54. References
  55. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">06</span>&#160;&#160;Retail brand management: Perception, performance and improvement  Retail brand management: Perception, performance and improvement
  56. Jesko Perrey and Thomas Meyer
  57. Retail’s new branding priority
  58. Building and sustaining a strong brand in retail
  59. The elements of retail brand perception
  60. Benchmarking brand performance
  61. Building brands; boosting business
  62. Brand promise and retail’s organizational orientation
  63. Biographies
  64. Reference
  65. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">07</span>&#160;&#160;Why brand matters in B2B  Why brand matters in B2B
  66. Michael D’Esopo and Simon Glynn
  67. What brand needs to do in B2B
  68. Making brand work in B2B
  69. Biographies
  70. Notes
  71. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">08</span>&#160;&#160;Managing media as brands: Case study &#8211; branding news organizations  Managing media as brands: Case study – branding news organizations
  72. Walter S McDowell, PhD
  73. Part one: Media as brands
  74. Part two: Case study – branding news organizations
  75. Biography
  76. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">09</span>&#160;&#160;Brand not bland: The financial services challenge  Brand not bland: The financial services challenge
  77. Mike Symes
  78. A reputation you can bank on?
  79. Comply but don’t conform
  80. Sameness-shunning stories
  81. Oxygen Finance: A breath of fresh air
  82. First Direct: The unexpected bank
  83. Out-local the nationals and out-national the locals
  84. It really is that simple
  85. Turning banking on its head
  86. FRANK: Cool for cash
  87. Love your bank at last
  88. The world’s greatest bank
  89. Extended credit
  90. Above the call of duty – a mission to serve
  91. That memorable meerkat
  92. Shaping wealth for generations
  93. The bank that loves to prank
  94. The 4 Rs of financial branding
  95. Biography
  96. References
  97. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">10</span>&#160;&#160;Building a breakthrough non-profit brand  Building a breakthrough non-profit brand
  98. Jocelyne Daw
  99. The growing force of non-profits
  100. The new non-profit imperative: A competitive advantage
  101. From traditional to breakthrough
  102. Defining a breakthrough non-profit brand
  103. The non-profit brand journey
  104. Discover your authentic brand purpose
  105. UNICEF’s breakthrough brand journey
  106. The way forward
  107. Biography
  108. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">11</span>&#160;&#160;A brand/story conceptual framework &#8211; for understanding mass fashion  A brand/story conceptual framework – for understanding mass fashion
  109. Joseph H Hancock, II PhD
  110. Style, fashion and branding
  111. Conventional branding and brand/story
  112. Lifestyle merchandising
  113. Meaning management
  114. Biography
  115. References
  116. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">12</span>&#160;&#160;Research advances in the building of hotel brands  Research advances in the building of hotel brands
  117. Professor John O’Neill
  118. How to measure value of a hotel brand
  119. Hotel brand as a value creator
  120. Hotel brand and satisfaction
  121. Hotel brand extension
  122. Hotel branding and franchising
  123. Concluding remarks
  124. Biography
  125. References
  126. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">13</span>&#160;&#160;The city as a brand  The city as a brand
  127. Jeremy Hildreth and JT Singh
  128. Cities don’t go out of business
  129. Cities are massively influenced by pre-existing macro factors
  130. Cities have an eclectic mix of audiences and ‘consumers’
  131. Cities are the ultimate word-of-mouth product
  132. Levers for branding the city
  133. The built environment
  134. Lighting and the night-time city
  135. Streetscapes and street-level leitmotivs
  136. Vibrancy and vibe
  137. Landmarks and legibility
  138. Arrivals and first impressions
  139. Public policy and problem solving
  140. People, culture and cuisine
  141. Rituals and experiences
  142. Identity-embodying special events
  143. Branded consumer goods and city exports
  144. Conclusion and call to arms
  145. Biographies
  146. References
  147. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">14</span>&#160;&#160;Technology branding: Building long-term value in a system-update world  Technology branding: Building long-term value in a system-update world
  148. Howard Breindel, Jonathan Paisner and Seth Margolis
  149. Understand ROI vs ROE
  150. Keep up with the ever-changing technology buyer
  151. Know where you stand on the brand spectrum
  152. Brand confidence
  153. Simplify … but don’t dumb down
  154. Biographies
  155. <span xmlns="" xmlns:epub="" class="uni-bold">15</span>&#160;&#160;Football brands  Football brands
  156. Sue Bridgewater
  157. What are the unique characteristics of football brands?
  158. Brand value of football brands
  159. Awareness
  160. Identity
  161. Perceived quality
  162. Loyalty: The battle for the hearts and minds
  163. How to keep fans loyal when times are tough
  164. The need to keep the football industry healthy
  165. Biography
  166. References
  167. Index