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The Automated Lighting Programmer's Handbook, 3rd Edition

Book Description

This guide helps lighting designers with the creative and operational challenges they face in their rapidly evolving industry. Providing respected and clear coverage of the process of programming automated lighting fixtures, the author brings the designer from basic principles to preproduction preparations. Concepts, procedures, and guidelines to ensure a successful production are covered as well as troubleshooting, much needed information on work relationships, and technology including LED lighting, console networking, digital lighting, and more. Chapters are peppered with advice and war stories from some of the most prominent lighting designers of today.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright Page
  5. Dedication
  6. Table of Contents
  7. List of Tables and Figures
  8. Acknowledgments
  9. Introduction
  10. Ten Things Every Programmer Should Know
    1. #1—Understanding the Fixtures
    2. #2—Basic Console Operations
    3. #3—Patching and Addressing
    4. #4—Making Lights Move
    5. #5—Long Hours and Late Nights
    6. #6—Subtractive versus Additive Color Mixing
    7. #7—Tracking
    8. #8—Protect the Data
    9. #9—How to Admit Your Faults
    10. #10—Who to Call
    11. But Wait, There’s More …
  11. 1. Programming Philosophies
    1. The Automated Lighting Programmer
    2. The Hollywood Syndrome
    3. Creativity and Consistency
    4. Learning to Program
      1. Look for Opportunities
      2. Programming Exercises
      3. Explore Your World
      4. Never Stop Learning
      5. Be an Artist
  12. 2. Automated Lighting Concepts
    1. DMX-512
    2. DMX Protocols
    3. Fixture Modes
    4. Crossfade
    5. Bump
    6. Parameter Abilities
    7. Precedence (HTP and LTP)
    8. Color Mixing
    9. Tracking
      1. Nontracking Consoles
      2. Tracking Consoles
      3. Advantages of Tracking
      4. Disadvantages of Tracking
      5. Practice Makes Perfect
  13. 3. Preparing for Programming
    1. Fixture Setup
    2. Fixture Libraries
    3. The Console
    4. Preparing the Patch
    5. Numbers Everywhere
    6. Groups
      1. Grouping Basics
      2. Too Many Numbers
      3. Selecting with Groups
      4. Additional Group Features
      5. Read All about it
    7. Building a Basic Outline
    8. Protecting Your Work
    9. Always be Prepared
  14. 4. Basic Programming
    1. Understanding Your Fixtures
    2. Speed Channels
      1. The Fastest Moves
      2. It’s about Time
    3. Conventional Channels
    4. Palettes/Presets
  15. 5. Intermediate Programming
    1. Mark Cues
      1. Tricks of the Trade
      2. Automated Mark Cues
      3. The Magic of Marking
    2. Block Cues
      1. Marking and Blocking
      2. Organization
      3. Overblocking
    3. Effects Generators
      1. The DMX Protocol
      2. Trigonometry to the Rescue
      3. Modifying the Starting Point
      4. Modifying the Size and Rate
      5. Offsetting Each Fixture
      6. Different Wave Forms
      7. Other Parameters
      8. Keeping it Simple
    4. Intensity Effects
      1. Adding Dynamics
      2. Adjusting Intensity Effects
      3. Use Effects Wisely
    5. Kickin’ it Old School
      1. The Fireworks Chase
      2. Making the Magic
      3. Timing
      4. Modern Miracles
      5. Applying Concepts
    6. Common Chases
    7. Fanning
      1. The Origins of Fanning
      2. Basic Fanning Procedures
      3. The Order of Fixture Selection
      4. But Wait! There’s More …
      5. Now is the Time
      6. Stay Cool as You Fan
    8. Multi-cell Units
  16. 6. Advanced Programming
    1. Default Values
      1. Using Default Values
      2. Custom Default Values
      3. Study the Defaults
      4. Deciding Upon Defaults
    2. Magic Sheets and Layouts
      1. Graphical Selection
      2. Creating the Layout
      3. Advanced Operations
      4. Timing is Key
      5. I Don’t Have That!
      6. Share it with Others
      7. Visual Stimulus
    3. Pixel Mapping
    4. Visualization
      1. How it Works
      2. Benefits
      3. Programming
      4. Cueing
      5. Two-Way Communication
      6. Program Anywhere
    5. It’s Time for Timecode
      1. The History of Timecode
      2. Defining Timecode
      3. Timecode and Lighting
      4. Changing Time
      5. Hidden Dangers
      6. Back to the Future
    6. The Magic of MIDI
      1. Lighting Applications
      2. MIDI Notes
      3. MIDI Show Control
      4. Be Prepared
    7. Other Types of Automation
      1. Automation Abounds
  17. 7. Media Servers and Digital Lighting
    1. Content
    2. New Jobs
    3. New Functionality and Terminology
    4. Programming Media-Based Lighting
      1. Enough is Enough
    5. Working with Layers
      1. The Console Problem
      2. Fixture Numbering
      3. Patching the Parts
    6. The Future is Now
  18. 8. The Age of Networking
    1. Network Setup
    2. Networking Basics
    3. Multi-User Programming
    4. Network Backup and Failover
    5. Distributed Processing
    6. DMX Distribution
    7. Connectivity
    8. Remote Access
    9. Connecting to the Cloud
    10. RDM and What it Means to You
    11. E1.31 (sACN) and E1.33 (DMX-NET): The New Frontiers
    12. Ease of Use
  19. 9. Programming Genres
    1. Structured and Corporate Theatre
      1. Organization
      2. Conventionals
      3. Dual Consoles
      4. Prepared Theatrics
    2. Concert Tours
      1. It is All About the Music
      2. Before You Program
      3. Cue Building
      4. Standard Operating Procedure
      5. Every Concert is Different
    3. Television Events
      1. The Cameras are Your Eyes
      2. Adjusting for the Camera
      3. Colors and Their Temperature
      4. The Magic of Television
      5. The Magic Box
    4. Music Festivals and Busking
      1. Organize Your Data
      2. Programming
      3. A Busking Approach
      4. Visiting LDs
      5. Fun for All
    5. Architectural Installations
      1. Where is FOH?
      2. Look at the Time
      3. User Interactions
      4. Maintenance
      5. Permanent Joys
  20. 10. Troubleshooting
    1. Common Problems
      1. Data Problems
      2. Console Problems
      3. Network Problems
      4. Fixture Problems
      5. Operator Error
      6. Getting Help
    2. Emergency Preparedness
      1. Be Prepared
      2. Safety of Others
      3. Personal Safety
      4. The Actor’s Point of View
      5. Safety First
  21. 11. Programmer and Designer Relationships
    1. People are People
    2. Types of LDs
    3. Troubled Waters
    4. Changing Tides
    5. Life is Like a Box of Chocolates
  22. 12. Words of Wisdom from Industry Professionals
    1. Programming
      1. Jason Badger, Programmer
      2. Roy Bennett, Designer
      3. Christian Choi, Programmer
      4. C. Andrew Dunning, Designer and Programmer
      5. Mike Falconer, Programmer
      6. Demfis Fyssicopulos, Programmer
      7. Jon Griffin, Designer and Programmer
      8. Rob Halliday, Programmer
      9. Bobby Harrell, Designer and Programmer
      10. Bud Horowitz, Designer and Programmer
      11. Steve Irwin, Designer and Programmer
      12. Seth Jackson, Designer and Programmer
      13. Mark “Junior” Jacobson, Designer and Programmer
      14. Shannon January, Designer and Programmer
      15. Mats Karlson, Industry Expert
      16. Marcus Krömer, Programmer
      17. Steve Lieberman, Designer and Programmer
      18. Jim Ohrberg, Designer and Programmer
      19. Mitch Peebles, Programmer
      20. Paul Pelletier, Programmer
      21. John Rayment, Designer
      22. Scott Riley, Designer and Programmer
      23. Larry “Uncle Fester” Robbins, Designer and Programmer
      24. Timothy F. Rogers, Programmer
      25. Susan Rose, Programmer
      26. Richard “Nook” Schoenfeld, Designer and Programmer
      27. Henry M. Sume, Designer and Programmer
      28. Anne Valentino, Desk Designer
      29. Jon “Hillbilly” Weir, Designer and Programmer
    2. Design
      1. Richard Belliveau, Automated Lighting Inventor and Visionary
      2. John Broderick, Designer
      3. Dall Brown, Designer
      4. David Davidian, Designer
      5. John Featherstone, Designer
      6. Bryan Hartley, Designer and Programmer
      7. Jim Lenahan, Designer
      8. Paul Normandale, Designer
      9. Benoit Richard, Designer and Programmer
      10. Marsha Stern, Designer
    3. Demeanor
      1. Butch Allen, Designer and Programmer
      2. Mike Baldassari, Designer
      3. Ken Billington, Designer
      4. Allen Branton, Designer
      5. Mark Butts, Designer and Programmer
      6. Vickie Claiborne, Programmer
      7. Patrick Dierson, Designer and Programmer
      8. Cory Fitzgerald, Designer and Programmer
      9. Laura Frank, Programmer
      10. Steve Garner, Programmer
      11. Tim Grivas, Programmer
      12. David “Gurn” Kaniski, Designer and Programmer
      13. Eric Kennedy, Programmer
      14. Tom Kenny, Designer
      15. Hillary Knox, Programmer
      16. Esteban Lima, Designer
      17. Eric Marchwinski, Programmer
      18. Heath Marrinan, Design and Programmer
      19. Michael Nevitt, Designer and Programmer
      20. Arnold Serame, Design and Programmer
      21. Matthew Shimamoto, Designer and Programmer
      22. Howard Ungerleider, Designer
      23. Lawrence Upton, Designer
      24. Ross Williams, Designer and Programmer
  23. Appendix A: Sydney 2000 Olympic Games Journal
  24. Appendix B: Metallica Touring Journal
  25. Appendix C: The Crystal Method: A Case Study
  26. Glossary
  27. Index