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The Art of Product Design: Changing How Things Get Made

Book Description

Embrace Open Engineering and accelerate the design and manufacturing processes

Product development is a team sport, but most companies don't practice it that way. Organizations should be drawing on the creativity of engaged customers and outsiders, but instead they rely on the same small group of internal "experts" for new ideas. Designers and engineers should be connecting with marketing, sales, customer support, suppliers, and most importantly, customers. The Art of Product Design explains the rise of "Open Engineering," a way of breaking down barriers and taking advantage of web-based communities, knowledge, and tools to accelerate the design and manufacturing processes.

  • Explains how to establish open flows of information inside and outside an organization, increasing the quality and frequency of input from different groups and stakeholders

  • Hardi Meybaum is the founder and CEO of GrabCad, the largest community of mechanical engineers and designers in the world

  • Open Engineering is crowdsourcing, it's collaborating, it's sharing and connecting. And it's helping a growing number of companies create better products faster than they ever imagined. The Art of Product Design shows you how to harness its power for your company.

    Table of Contents

    1. Cover
    2. Contents
    3. Title
    4. Copyright
    5. Introduction: The Digital Revolution Gets Physical
    6. Chapter 1: Gearheads Get No Respect
      1. Love at First Sight
      2. Getting over the Wall
      3. What I Discovered in America
      4. Executive Takeaways
    7. Chapter 2: Since the Potter’s Wheel, the Most Important Tool in History
      1. CAD History from the Cavemen in a Nutshell
      2. Cloud Looms over the Picnic
      3. I Looked up at the Cloud . . . and Saw the Ball Heading Straight at Me
      4. Executive Takeaways
    8. Chapter 3: A Million Engineers on the March
      1. We Set Out to Stop Reinventing the Wheel . . . and Ended up with Something Unexpected
      2. Four Flywheels Driving Open Engineering
      3. Bottom Line: This Revolution Is Bottom Up
      4. Executive Takeaways
    9. Chapter 4: New Culture, New Tools Converge in the Cloud
      1. All Heads Converge in the Cloud
      2. Wrapping Heads around a New Business Model
      3. The Exciting Part
      4. Executive Takeaways
    10. Chapter 5: Design Challenge
      1. Who’s Taking the GrabCAD Challenge?
      2. General Openness
      3. Sketching out a New Model for Design: Key Word Is “Collaboration”
      4. If Big, Start by Opening Inward
      5. Start-Ups: You and Whose Army?
      6. It May Look Good on Paper . . .
      7. Executive Takeaways
    11. Chapter 6: Here’s My Prototype; Please Kick the Crap Out of It
      1. Virtual Is Virtuous . . .
      2. . . . But We Still Need to Get Physical
      3. Executive Takeaways
    12. Chapter 7: Manufacturing
      1. No More Colored Collars?
      2. Offshoring: Amazingly Enough, It Works . . . So Far
      3. Homemade: Now It Just May Be Viable
      4. Robots That Speak CAD
      5. The Earth Becomes Flat
      6. Making “The Old Man” Virtual
      7. What’s the Outcome?
      8. Executive Takeaways
    13. Chapter 8: Marketing
      1. As Close as Lips and Teeth
      2. Make Your Engineers Dance
      3. Put a Car on the Moon? Piece of Cake, Mate
      4. The Marketing Treasure in CAD
      5. Executive Takeaways
    14. Chapter 9: The Puzzle Pattern Emerges
      1. Piece by Piece
      2. The Digital Force That Drives It Forward . . .
      3. . . . And the Decisive Factor That Will Determine the Winners
      4. End the Senseless Zombie Slaughter
      5. The Winning Hand?
    15. Appendix: Meet the Cadopoly
      1. Dassault Systèmes SA
      2. Autodesk Inc.
      3. PTC (Formerly Parametric Technology Corporation)
      4. Siemens PLM Software
    16. Acknowledgments
    17. Index