You are previewing The Application of Programmable DSPs in Mobile Communications.
O'Reilly logo
The Application of Programmable DSPs in Mobile Communications

Book Description

With the introduction of WAP in Europe and I-mode in Japan, mobile terminals took their first steps out of the world of mobile telephony and into the world of mobile data. At the same time, the shift from 2nd generation to 3rd generation cellular technology has increased the potential data rate available to mobile users by tenfold as well as shifting data transport from circuit switched to packet data. These fundamental shifts in nature and the quantity of data available to mobile users has led to an explosion in the number of applications being developed for future digital terminal devices. Though these applications are diverse they share a common need for complex Digital Signal Processing (DSP) and in most cases benefit from the use of programmable DSPs (Digital Signal Processors).

* Features contributions from experts who discuss the implementation and applications of programmable DSPs

* Includes detailed introductions to speech coding, speech recognition, video and audio compression, biometric identification and their application for mobile communications devices

* Discusses the alternative DSP technology which is attempting to unseat the programmable DSP from the heart of tomorrow's mobile terminals

* Presents innovative new applications that are waiting to be discovered in the unique environment created when mobility meets signal processing

The Application of Programmable DSPs in Mobile Communications provides an excellent overview for engineers moving into the area of mobile communications or entrepreneurs looking to understand state of the art in mobile terminals. It is also a must for students and professors looking for new application areas where DSP technology is being applied.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. Biographies
  6. List of Contributors
  7. 1: Introduction
    1. 1.1 It's a Personal Matter
    2. 1.2 The Super Phone?
    3. 1.3 New Services
    4. 1.4 The Curse and Opportunity of Moore's Law
    5. 1.5 The Book
  8. 2: The History of DSP Based Architectures in Second Generation Cellular Handsets
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 A History of Cellular Standards and Wireless Handset Architectures
    3. 2.3 Trends in Low Power DSPs
    4. References
  9. 3: The Role of Programmable DSPs in Dual Mode (2G and 3G) Handsets
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 The Wireless Standards
    3. 3.3 A generic FDD DS Digital Baseband (DBB) – Functional View
    4. 3.4 Functional Description of a Dual-Mode System
    5. 3.5 Complexity Analysis and HW/SW Partitioning
    6. 3.6 Hardware Design Approaches
    7. 3.7 Software Processing and Interface with Higher Layers
    8. 3.8 Summary
    9. 3.9 Abbreviations
    10. References
  10. 4: Programmable DSPs for 3G Base Station Modems
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Overview of 3G Base Stations: Requirements
    3. 4.3 System Analysis
    4. 4.4 Flexible Coprocessor Solutions
    5. 4.5 Summary and Conclusions
  11. 5: The Use of Programmable DSPs in Antenna Array Processing
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Antenna Array Signal Model
    3. 5.3 Linear Beamforming Techniques
    4. 5.4 Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) Signal Extraction
    5. References
  12. 6: The Challenges of Software-Defined Radio
    1. 6.1 Cellular Communications Standards
    2. 6.2 What is SDR?
    3. 6.3 Digitizing Today's Analog Operations
    4. 6.4 Implementation Challenges
    5. 6.5 Analog and ADC Issues
    6. 6.6 Channel Filter
    7. 6.7 Delta-Sigma ADC
    8. 6.8 Conclusion
    9. References
  13. 7: Enabling Multimedia Applications in 2.5G and 3G Wireless Terminals: Challenges and Solutions
    1. 7.1. Introduction
    2. 7.2. OMAP™ H/W Architecture
    3. 7.3. OMAP™ S/W Architecture
    4. 7.4. OMAP™ Multimedia Applications
    5. 7.5. Conclusion
    6. Further Reading
  14. 8: A Flexible Distributed Java Environment for Wireless PDA Architectures Based on DSP Technology
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Java and Energy: Analyzing the Challenge
    3. 8.3 A Modular Java Virtual Machine
    4. 8.4 Ongoing Work on Scratchy
    5. 8.5 Conclusion
    6. References
  15. 9: Speech Coding Standards in Mobile Communications
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 Speech Coder Attributes
    3. 9.3 Speech Coding Basics
    4. 9.4 Speech Coding Standards
    5. 9.5 Speech Coder Implementation
    6. 9.6 Conclusion
    7. Acknowledgements
    8. References
  16. 10: Speech Recognition Solutions for Wireless Devices
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 DSP Based Speech Recognition Technology
    3. 10.3 Overview of Texas Instruments DSP Based Speech Recognizers
    4. 10.4 TIESR Details
    5. 10.5 Speech-Enabled Wireless Application Prototypes
    6. 10.6 Summary and Conclusions
    7. References
  17. 11: Video and Audio Coding for Mobile Applications
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Video
    3. 11.3 Audio
    4. 11.4 Audio and Video Decode on a DSP
    5. References
  18. 12: Security Paradigm for Mobile Terminals
    1. 12.1 Mobile Commerce General Environment
    2. 12.2 Secure Platform Definition
    3. 12.3 Software Based Security Component
    4. 12.4 Hardware Based Security Component: Distributed Security
    5. 12.5 Secure Platform in Digital Base Band Controller/MODEM
    6. 12.6 Secure Platform in Application Platform
    7. 12.7 Conclusion
  19. 13: Biometric Systems Applied To Mobile Communications
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 The Speaker Verification Task
    3. 13.3 Live Fingerprint Recognition Systems
    4. 13.4 Conclusions
    5. References
  20. 14: The Role of Programmable DSPs in Digital Radio
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Digital Transmission Methods
    3. 14.3 Eureka 147 System
    4. 14.4 IBOC
    5. 14.5 Satellite Systems
    6. 14.6 Conclusion
    7. References
  21. 15: Benchmarking DSP Architectures for Low Power Applications
    1. 15.1 Introduction
    2. 15.2 LPC Speech Codec Algorithm
    3. 15.3 Design Methodology
    4. 15.4 Platforms
    5. 15.5 Final Results
    6. 15.6 Conclusions
    7. Acknowledgements
    8. References
  22. 16: Low Power Sensor Networks
    1. 16.1 Introduction
    2. 16.2 Power-Aware Node Architecture
    3. 16.3 Hardware Design Issues
    4. 16.4 Signal Processing in the Network
    5. 16.5 Signal Processing Algorithms
    6. 16.6 Signal Processing Architectures
    7. 16.7 Conclusions
    8. References
  23. 17: The Pleiades Architecture
    1. 17.1 Goals and General Approach
    2. 17.2 The Pleiades Platform – The Architecture Template
    3. 17.3 The Control Processor
    4. 17.4 Satellite Processors
    5. 17.5 Communication Network
    6. 17.6 Reconfiguration
    7. 17.7 Distributed Data-Driven Control
    8. 17.8 The Pleiades Design Methodology
    9. 17.9 The P1 Prototype
    10. 17.10 The Maia Processor
    11. 17.11 Summary
    12. References
  24. 18: Application Specific Instruction Set Architecture Extensions for DSPs
    1. 18.1 The Need for Instruction Set Extensibility in a Signal Processor
    2. 18.2 ISA Extension Capability of the TMS320C55x Processor
    3. 18.3 Domains of Applications and Practical Examples
    4. 18.4 ISA Extensions Design Flow
    5. References
  25. 19: The Pointing Wireless Device for Delivery of Location Based Applications
    1. 19.1 Next Generation Wireless Devices
    2. 19.2 The Platform
    3. 19.3 New Multimedia Applications
    4. 19.4 Location Based Information
    5. 19.5 Using Devices to Summon Information
    6. 19.6 Pointing to the Real World
    7. 19.7 Pointing Greatly Simplifies the User Interface
    8. 19.8 Uses of Pointing
    9. 19.9 Software Architecture
    10. 19.10 Use of the DSP in the Pointing System
    11. 19.11 Pointing Enhanced Location Applications
    12. 19.12 Benefits of Pointing
    13. 19.13 Recommended Data Standardization
    14. 19.14 Conclusion
  26. Index