You are previewing Testable JavaScript.

Testable JavaScript

Cover of Testable JavaScript by Mark Ethan Trostler Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. Testable JavaScript
  2. Dedication
  3. Preface
    1. The Goal of This Book
    2. Who This Book Is For
    3. Who This Book Is Not For
    4. Who I Am
    5. What You Will Learn from This Book
      1. Content
    6. If You Like (or Don’t Like) This Book
    7. Recap
    8. How to Contact Us
    9. Conventions Used in This Book
    10. Using Code Examples
    11. Safari® Books Online
    12. Thanks!
  4. 1. Testable JavaScript
    1. Prior Art
      1. Agile Development
      2. Test-Driven Development
      3. Behavior-Driven Development
      4. The Best Approach?
    2. Code Is for People
      1. Why
      2. What
      3. How
    3. Beyond Application Code
      1. Testing
      2. Debugging
    4. Recap
  5. 2. Complexity
    1. Code Size
    2. JSLint
    3. Cyclomatic Complexity
    4. Reuse
    5. Fan-Out
    6. Fan-In
    7. Coupling
      1. Content Coupling
      2. Common Coupling
      3. Control Coupling
      4. Stamp Coupling
      5. Data Coupling
      6. No Coupling
      7. Instantiation
    8. Coupling Metrics
    9. Coupling in the Real World
      1. Testing Coupled Code
    10. Dependency Injection
    11. Comments
      1. YUIDoc
      2. JSDoc
      3. Docco/Rocco
    12. The Human Test
    13. Recap
  6. 3. Event-Based Architectures
    1. The Benefits of Event-Based Programming
    2. The Event Hub
      1. Using the Event Hub
      2. Responses to Thrown Events
      3. Event-Based Architectures and MVC Approaches
      4. Event-Based Architectures and Object-Oriented Programming
      5. Event-Based Architectures and Software as a Service
    3. Web-Based Applications
    4. Testing Event-Based Architectures
    5. Caveats to Event-Based Architectures
      1. Scalability
      2. Broadcasting
      3. Runtime Checking
      4. Security
      5. State
    6. A Smarter Hub: The Event Switch
      1. Deployment
      2. An Implementation
      3. Sessions
      4. Extensibility
    7. Recap
  7. 4. Unit Tests
    1. A Framework
    2. Let’s Get Clean
    3. Writing Good Tests
      1. Isolation
      2. Scope
      3. Defining Your Functions
      4. Positive Testing
      5. Negative Testing
      6. Code Coverage
    4. Real-World Testing
      1. Dependencies
      2. Asynchronous Testing
    5. Running Tests: Client-Side JavaScript
      1. PhantomJS
      2. Selenium
    6. Running Tests: Server-Side JavaScript
      1. Jasmine
    7. Recap
  8. 5. Code Coverage
    1. Coverage Basics
    2. Code Coverage Data
    3. A Hands-on Example
      1. Instrumenting Files
      2. Anatomy of a Coveraged File
    4. Exercise/Deploy
      1. Client-Side JavaScript
      2. Server-Side JavaScript
    5. Persisting Coverage Information
      1. Unit Tests
      2. Integration Tests
    6. Generating Output
    7. Aggregation
    8. Hidden Files
    9. Coverage Goals
    10. Recap
  9. 6. Integration, Performance, and Load Testing
    1. Integration Testing
      1. Selenium
      2. CasperJS
    2. Performance Testing
      1. Generating HAR Files
      2. Viewing HAR Files
      3. Browser Performance Testing
    3. Load Testing
      1. Browser Load Testing
    4. Tracking Resource Usage
      1. Client-Side Tracking
      2. Server-Side Tracking
    5. Recap
  10. 7. Debugging
    1. In-Browser Debugging
      1. Firefox
      2. Chrome
      3. Safari
      4. Internet Explorer
    2. Node.js Debugging
    3. Remote Debugging
      1. Chrome
      2. PhantomJS
      3. Firefox
    4. Mobile Debugging
      1. Android 4
      2. iOS 6
      3. Adobe Edge Inspect
      4. Other Mobile Debugging Options
    5. Production Debugging
      1. Minified Code
      2. Source Maps
    6. Recap
  11. 8. Automation
    1. What to Automate
    2. When to Automate
    3. How to Automate
      1. Automating with Continuous Integration
      2. Automating the Development Environment
      3. Automating the Build Environment
      4. Deployment
    4. Recap
  12. Index
  13. About the Author
  14. Colophon
  15. Copyright
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Chapter 8. Automation

The point of writing testable JavaScript is so that you and your colleagues can easily fix and maintain the code going forward; hence it is a good skill to possess. Writing tests for future versions of the code becomes easy, and this solid foundation makes automation much more effective. Automation ensures that you can write testable JavaScript in a repeatable way as quickly as possible. When considering automation, you must know what to automate, when to automate, and how to automate.

What to Automate

Determining what to automate is easy: automate everything! This includes JSLint and other forms of static analysis, all tests, code coverage reports, application packaging, and application deployment, including rollback, feedback, bug submission, statistics, and bucket or feature testing. Anything you have to do more than once should be automated. Any time you use up front to automate will be more than paid back over the lifetime of your code.

When to Automate

In terms of when to automate, you have three opportunities: while coding, while building, and while deploying. These three points in the software development process all have different requirements, even if some of the tools you use for each process are the same. For instance, the process for deploying your code to test it while under development may be different from the process for deploying the code to production. As much as those two processes should be kept the same, in reality they are different. Deploying ...

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