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Sustainability Science for Social, Economic, and Environmental Development

Book Description

While the effects of climate change become ever more apparent and pressing, the discussion of sustainable practices and environmental protection is a common overture among the academic and scientific communities. However, in order to be truly effective, sustainable solutions must be tested and applied in real-world situations. Sustainability Science for Social, Economic, and Environmental Development investigates the role of sustainability in the everyday lives of ordinary citizens, including issues of economy, social interaction, exploitation of natural resources, and sources of renewable energy. In this book, researchers, policy makers, economists, scientists, and general readers will all find crucial insight into the parallels between theory and practice in sustainable development.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
  5. Preface
    1. MOTIVATION FACTORS
    2. ORGANISATION OF THE VOLUME
    3. TO BEGIN WITH ...
  6. Acknowledgment
  7. Chapter 1: Economic Growth, Sustainable Development, and the Role of Markets
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. THE DAYS OF CLASSICAL POLITICAL ECONOMY…
    3. POST-WAR PERIOD: STAGE THEORY OF GROWTH AND CAPITAL FORMATION
    4. POST-WAR MARXIST THINKING
    5. NEOCLASSICAL GROWTH THEORY
    6. FROM ECONOMIC GROWTH TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
    7. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
    8. IS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OPPOSED TO ECONOMIC GROWTH?
    9. THE ROLE OF MARKETS
    10. CONCLUDING REMARKS
    11. REFERENCES
    12. ENDNOTES
  8. Chapter 2: On Value and Price of Environmental Resources
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. EMERGENCE OF MARKETS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES
    4. WHY ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETS FAIL: THE PROBLEM OF VALUATION
    5. FINAL COMMENTS
    6. REFERENCES
  9. Chapter 3: Altruism, Social Networks, and Social Capital
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. REFERENCES
  10. Chapter 4: Justice, Migration, Agriculture, and Sustainability
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. REFERENCES
  11. Chapter 5: Feminism and Tenets of Philosophy of Economics
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    4. REFERENCES
  12. Chapter 6: Labour Observatories for Agricultural Policymaking and Sustainable Development
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. REFERENCES
  13. Chapter 7: Biofuels and Renewables
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. PEOPLE
    4. PLANET
    5. POLICIES
    6. POLITICS
    7. REFERENCES
    8. ENDNOTES
  14. Chapter 8: Biofuel Sustainability and Transition Pathways
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. REFERENCES
    4. ENDNOTES
  15. Chapter 9: Valuation and Market-Based Pricing of Economic and Ecosystem Services of Water Resources
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. CONCLUSION
    4. REFERENCES
  16. Chapter 10: “Virtual Water” and Occam's Razor
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. VIRTUAL WATER IMPORTS AND RICARDIAN COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: AN INSTITUTIONAL MECHANISM
    4. THE NOTION OF SCARCITY VALUE IN WATER SCARCE ECONOMIES
    5. IMPLICATIONS OF SCARCITY VALUE: HOW VIRTUAL WATER IMPORTS AFFECT IT?
    6. DOES VIRTUAL WATER MERELY IMPLY CROP-WATER REQUIREMENT?
    7. VIRTUAL WATER IMPORT: AN “ACTUAL” INGENUITY?
    8. CONCLUDING REMARKS
    9. REFERENCES
  17. Chapter 11: Water Scarcity and Conflicts
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. THE RISK OF WATER AVAILABILITY IN SOUTH ASIA
    4. THE THEORETICAL SETTING: DEFINING WATER SCARCE ECONOMY AND SCARCITY VALUE
    5. THE STRUCTURE OF WATER FUTURES MARKET
    6. USING FUTURES MARKET TO HEDGE WATER AVAILABILITY RISK
    7. A WATER FUTURES EXCHANGE BEYOND NATIONAL BOUNDARIES
    8. CONCLUDING REMARKS
    9. REFERENCES
    10. ENDNOTES
  18. Chapter 12: Two First Generation Biofuel (Biodiesel, Bioethanol) and Sustainability
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. ROLE AND POTENTIAL OF BIOFUELS IN INDIA’S ENERGY SCENARIO
    4. THE BIOFUELS PROGRAMME OF THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA AND ITS CONNECTION TO SUSTAINABILITY DIMENSIONS (ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY)
    5. INTERFACES BETWEEN OTHER POLICIES AND SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS
    6. TRADE PERSPECTIVES IN BIOFUELS AND ITS CONNECTION WITH SUSTAINABILITY
    7. BIO-ETHANOL
    8. SUMMARY OF THE ANALYSIS FOR BIODIESEL
    9. SUMMARY OF THE ANALYSIS FOR BIOETHANOL
    10. CONCLUSION
    11. REFERENCES
    12. ENDNOTES
  19. Chapter 13: Connections between Spectrum Allocation, Social Capital and Sustainability
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. REFERENCES
  20. Chapter 14: Story of Live Discussion in Autos of Delhi
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. AUTO THREE WHEELER SECTOR
    4. PURCHASE VALUE, FINANCING
    5. SECURITY DEPOSIT SYSTEM
    6. REFERENCE:
    7. ENDNOTES
  21. Chapter 15: Energy and Emission Linkages from the Three Wheeler Autorickshaws of Kolkata
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. REGULARITY INSTRUMENTS TO REDUCE GHG EMISSIONS IN TRANSPORT SECTOR FOR INDIA AND WEST BENGAL
    4. AUTO SECTOR IN KOLKATA CITY
    5. METHODOLOGY OF THE ANALYSIS
    6. FINDINGS
    7. POLICY IMPLICATIONS
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. REFERENCES
    10. ENDNOTES
    11. APPENDIX
  22. Chapter 16: Economics, Environmental Policy, Trade and Sustainability
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. NATURAL RESOURCE ACCOUNTING
    3. VALUATION TECHNIQUES
    4. CONTINGENT VALUATION
    5. HEDONIC ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES
    6. MARKET BASED (ECONOMIC INSTRUMENTS)
    7. ADVANTAGES OF ECONOMIC INSTRUMENTS
    8. TRADE AND SUSTAINABILITY
    9. TRADE AND INEQUALITY
    10. TRADE IN SERVICES AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
    11. CONCLUSION
    12. REFERENCES
    13. ENDNOTES
  23. Chapter 17: Can a Poor Be Vegetarian for Addressing Sustainability?
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. REFERENCES
  24. Related References
  25. Compilation of References
  26. About the Contributors