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Sustainability, Energy and Architecture

Book Description

This unique volume offers insights from renowned experts in energy efficient building from the world over, providing a multi-faceted overview of the state-of-the-art in energy efficient architecture. It opens by defining what constitutes a sustainable building, suggesting bases for sorely needed benchmarks, then explains the most important techniques and tools available to engineers and architects exploring green building technologies. It covers such pivotal issues as daylighting, LED lighting, integrating renewables such as solar thermal and cooling, retrofitting, LEED and similar certification efforts, passive houses, net-zero and close-zero structures, water recycling, and much more. Highlighting best practices for commercial buildings and private homes, in widely varied climates and within vastly different socio-economic contexts, this illustrated reference will guide architects and engineers in making sustainable choices in building materials and methods.



  • Explains the best methods and materials to support energy efficient building
  • Features case studies by experts from a dozen countries, demonstrating how sustainable architecture can be achieved in varied climates and economies
  • Covers both new constructions and retrofitting of existing structures

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Preface
  6. Authors’ Biography
  7. Chapter 1. Dutch Efforts Towards a Sustainable Built Environment
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1 Introduction
    3. 1.2 Passive Houses
    4. 1.3 Types of Case Studies
    5. 1.4 The Veldhuizerschool Ede
    6. 1.5 Christiaan Huygens College: an Energy Plus School
    7. 1.6 Conventional Dutch Building Design
    8. 1.7 Energy Saving Techniques
    9. 1.8 Novel Design and Examples
    10. 1.9 The TNT Green Office
    11. 1.10 Sustainability
    12. 1.11 Diverse Sustainability Measures
    13. 1.12 Results of GreenCalc+ and LEED Assessment
    14. References
  8. Chapter 2. Low Energy Approaches to Design-Led Schemes – Five Case Studies
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1 Introduction
    3. 2.2 Case Studies 1 and 2 – Overview
    4. 2.3 Case Study 3 – Overview
    5. 2.4 Case Studies 4 & 5 – Overview
    6. 2.5 Conclusion
  9. Chapter 3. Sustainable Construction Materials
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Demand for Construction Materials
    3. 3.3 Material Resources
    4. 3.4 Renewable Materials
    5. 3.5 Recycled Materials
    6. 3.6 Life Cycle Analysis
    7. 3.7 Embodied Energy
    8. 3.8 Gross Energy Requirement
    9. 3.9 Process Energy Requirement
    10. 3.10 Embodied Carbon
    11. 3.11 Natural Building Materials
    12. 3.12 Short Rotation Renewable Materials
    13. 3.13 Summary
    14. References
  10. Chapter 4. The Sustainable Corporate Image and Renewables: From Technique to the Sensory Experience
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1 Introduction
    3. 4.2 Sustainable Innovation, or the Tried and Tested
    4. 4.3 The 20th Century, the Corporate Image and Sustainability
    5. 4.4 The Techno-Centric Sustainable Building in the 21st Century
    6. 4.5 The Sustainable Working Shed, Lion House, Alnwick, Northumberland, UK
    7. 4.6 Experiencing Renewables in Building Skins
    8. 4.7 The Responsive Skin and Corporate Image
    9. 4.8 Increasing Facade Layers: Double Skin Facades as a Passive Measure and a Cultural Message
    10. 4.9 Sustainability as Haptic Experience
    11. Conclusions
    12. References
  11. Chapter 5. Residential Deep Energy Retrofits in Cold Climates
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1 Introduction
    3. 5.2 Building Materials and Assemblies
    4. 5.3 Ventilation and Air Movement
    5. 5.4 Case Studies
  12. Chapter 6. Sustainable Building for a Green and an Efficient Built Environment: New and Existing Case Studies in Dubai
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1 Introduction
    3. 6.2 Climate Change: Cities and Buildings
    4. 6.3 Importance of Sustainable/Green Building
    5. 6.4 Sustainability Regulations and Laws Contributing to Carbon Emissions Reduction
    6. 6.5 Taxonomy of a Sustainable Building
    7. 6.6 Green Buildings in Dubai, UAE
    8. 6.7 Conclusions
    9. References
    10. Suggested Reading
  13. Chapter 7. The LED Lighting Revolution
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1 Introduction
    3. 7.2 From LED Chips to Fixtures
    4. 7.3 Optics
    5. 7.4 Fixture Body
    6. 7.5 Advantages and Features
    7. 7.6 Comparisons with Traditional Lighting
    8. 7.7 Architectural/General Illumination Applications
    9. 7.8 Case Studies
    10. 7.9 Future/Novel Designs Possible with LEDs
    11. 7.10 Conclusions
    12. References
  14. Chapter 8. Minimum Energy Housing in Cuba
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1 Introduction
    3. 8.2 Life Cycle and Sustainable Buildings
    4. 8.3 Design Strategies in Warm and Humid Climates
    5. 8.4 The Urban Microclimate
    6. 8.5 Vernacular Architecture in Cuba
    7. 8.6 Modern Architecture in Cuba
    8. 8.7 Present and Future
    9. 8.8 Final Remarks
  15. Chapter 9. Daylighting
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1 Introduction
    3. 9.2 Characteristics and Availability
    4. 9.3 Photometric Units
    5. 9.4 Colors
    6. 9.5 Daylight Availability
    7. 9.6 Performance of Daylighting
    8. 9.7 Comfort and Health
    9. 9.8 Visual Performance
    10. 9.9 Daylight Factor
    11. 9.10 Thermal Comfort and Energy Use
    12. 9.11 Daylighting Design
    13. 9.12 Daylighting Systems and Solar Control
    14. 9.13 Energy Saving and Daylight Responsive Controls
    15. 9.14 Design Tools
    16. References
  16. Chapter 10. Vernacular Tower Architecture of Sana’a: Theory and Method for Deriving Sustainable Design Guidelines
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1 Introduction
    3. 10.2 Background
    4. 10.3 Theoretical Model for Sustainable Architecture
    5. 10.4 Analysis
    6. 10.5 Conclusion
    7. References
    8. Appendix A Sustainable Design Guidelines Derived From Response of Architectural Form and Space to Climatic and Functional Factors
    9. Appendix B A Comparison between a Vertical Form and a Horizontal Form
  17. Chapter 11. Sustainable Buildings in Mediterranean Area
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1 Abitare Mediterraneo Project
    3. 11.2 EULEB
    4. 11.3 Technological and Business Incubator – Lucca, Italy
    5. 11.4 Bardini Museum – Florence, Italy
    6. 11.5 New Meyer Hospital – Florence, Italy
    7. 11.6 Primary School – Empoli, Italy
    8. 11.7 Malta Stock Exchange – La Villetta, Malta
  18. Chapter 12. A Low-Energy Building Project in Sweden – the Lindås Pilot Project
    1. Abstract
    2. 12.1 Introduction
    3. 12.2 The Building’s Energy Systems and Buildings in Energy Systems
    4. 12.3 Energy Use in Swedish Building Sector
    5. 12.4 Energy Use in Residential Buildings
    6. 12.5 New Technologies that Make Buildings more Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Sound
    7. 12.6 Action Plans and Energy Policies to Achieve Energy-Efficient Buildings
    8. 12.7 Building and the Health of Occupants
    9. 12.8 Some Examples of Low-Energy Buildings in Sweden
    10. 12.9 Energy-Efficient Buildings and Cities – a Strategic Direction for Urban Policy Makers
    11. 12.10 The Swedish Lindås Pilot Project – Houses without Heating Systems
    12. References
  19. Chapter 13. Key Characteristics of Top Performing Sustainable Buildings from the Perspective of the Users
    1. Abstract
    2. Acknowledgments
    3. 13.1 Introduction
    4. 13.2 The Buildings and their Users
    5. 13.3 Survey Methodology and Analytical Procedures
    6. 13.4 Design Features of Buildings with High Summary Indices
    7. 13.5 Key Characteristics and Common Features of these Sustainable Buildings
    8. References
    9. Appendix Calculation of Indices
  20. Chapter 14. Sustainable Buildings and their Relationship with Humans and Nature: Lessons from the Past
    1. Abstract
    2. Acknowledgments
    3. 14.1 Background and Present Situation
    4. 14.2 Traditional Architecture; The Outcome of a Complex Thinking System
    5. 14.3 Traditional Architecture and Adaptive Response to Climate
    6. 14.4 Wind Catcher/Tower
    7. 14.5 Spatial Organization: A Means to Adapt to Culture and Climate
    8. 14.6 Conclusion
    9. References and further reading
  21. Chapter 15. Architectural Buildings in Romania
    1. 15.1 One Family House in Burlusi Ciofringeni, Arges County, Romania
    2. 15.2 Amvic Passive Office Building – Bragadiru, Ilfov County, Romania
    3. 15.3 Residential Living Units in Cluj Napoca, Cluj County, Romania
    4. 15.4 Two Passive Houses in Caransebes, Caras-Severin County, Romania
    5. 15.5 Church in Bistra, Neamt County, Romania – Low-Energy Building
    6. 15.6 Conclusions
    7. References
  22. Chapter 16. Sustainable Architecture in Africa
    1. Abstract
    2. 16.1 Introduction
    3. 16.2 Bioclimatic Project: General Guidelines
    4. 16.3 Climatic Context
    5. 16.4 Building Location, Form and Orientation
    6. 16.5 Shading
    7. 16.6 Envelope Coatings
    8. 16.7 Insulation
    9. 16.8 Window Size and Glazing Type
    10. 16.9 Natural Ventilation
    11. 16.10 Thermal Mass
    12. 16.11 Evaporative Cooling
    13. 16.12 Control of Internal Gains
    14. 16.13 The Use of Environmental Controls
    15. 16.14 Passive Design and Thermal Comfort Criteria
  23. Chapter 17. Mud to Skyscraper – Building Revolution in 50 Years in the Middle East
    1. Abstract
    2. 17.1 Portable Housing: The Bedouin Tent
    3. 17.2 Mud Houses and Comfort
    4. 17.3 A New Generation of Buildings
    5. 17.4 What is the Solution?
    6. 17.5 Energy and Buildings
    7. 17.6 Final Remarks
  24. Index