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Surface Production Operations: Vol 2: Design of Gas-Handling Systems and Facilities, 3rd Edition

Book Description

Updated and better than ever, Design of Gas-Handling Systems and Facilities, 3rd Edition includes greatly expanded chapters on gas-liquid separation, gas sweetening, gas liquefaction, and gas dehydration —information necessary and critical to production and process engineers and designers. Natural gas is at the forefront of today's energy needs, and this book walks you through the equipment and processes used in gas-handling operations, including conditioning and processing, to help you effectively design and manage your gas production facility. Taking a logical approach from theory into practical application, Design of Gas-Handling Systems and Facilities, 3rd Edition contains many supporting equations as well as detailed tables and charts to facilite process design. Based on real-world case studies and experience, this must-have training guide is a reference that no natural gas practitioner and engineer should be without.



  • Packed with charts, tables, and diagrams
  • Features the prerequisite ASME and API codes
  • Updated chapters on gas-liquid separation, gas sweetening, gas liquefaction and gas dehydration

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Preface
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. Chapter One: Overview of Gas-Handling, Conditioning, and Processing Facilities
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1 Heating
    3. 1.2 Separation
    4. 1.3 Cooling
    5. 1.4 Stabilization
    6. 1.5 Compression
    7. 1.6 Gas Treating
    8. 1.7 Gas Dehydration
    9. 1.8 Gas Processing
  8. Chapter Two: Basic Principles
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1 Introduction
    3. 2.2 Fluid Analysis
    4. 2.3 Physical Properties
    5. 2.4 Flash Calculations
    6. 2.5 Characterizing the Flow Stream
    7. 2.6 Use of Computer Programs for Flash Calculations
    8. 2.7 Approximate Flash Calculations
    9. 2.8 Other Properties
    10. 2.9 Phase Equilibrium
  9. Chapter Three: Heat Transfer Theory
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1 Objectives
    3. 3.2 What Is a Heat Exchanger?
    4. 3.3 Process Specification
    5. 3.4 Pressure Drop Considerations
    6. 3.5 Basic Heat Transfer Theory
    7. 3.6 Determination of Mean Temperature Difference
    8. 3.7 Selection of Temperature Approach (∆<span xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" class="italic">T</span><sub xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops">2</sub>))
    9. 3.8 Determination of Heat Transfer Coefficient
    10. 3.9 Calculation of Film Coefficients
    11. 3.10 Tube Metal Resistance
    12. 3.11 Approximate Overall Heat Transfer Coefficients
    13. 3.12 Determination of Process Heat Duty
  10. Chapter Four: Heat Exchanger Configurations
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1 Overview
    3. 4.2 Shell-and-Tube Exchangers
    4. 4.3 Double-Pipe Exchangers
    5. 4.4 Plate-Fin Exchangers
    6. 4.5 Plate-and-Frame Exchangers
    7. 4.6 Indirect-Fired Heaters
    8. 4.7 Direct-Fired Heaters
    9. 4.8 Air-Cooled Exchangers
    10. 4.9 Cooling Towers
    11. 4.10 Other Types of Heat Exchangers
    12. 4.11 Heat Exchanger Selection
    13. 4.12 Comments on Example 4.3
    14. Exercises
  11. Chapter Five: Hydrate Prediction and Prevention
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1 Objectives
    3. 5.2 Overview
    4. 5.3 Water Content of Gas
    5. 5.4 Gas Hydrates
    6. 5.5 Prediction of Operating Temperature and Pressure
    7. 5.6 Temperature Drop Determination
    8. 5.7 Hydrate Prediction Correlations
    9. 5.8 Hydrate Prevention
    10. 5.9 Hydrate Inhibition
    11. Exercises
  12. Chapter Six: Condensate Stabilization
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1 Partial Pressures
    3. 6.2 Multistage Separation
    4. 6.3 Multiple Flashes at Constant Pressure and Increasing Temperature
    5. 6.4 Cold-Feed Distillation Tower
    6. 6.5 Distillation Tower with Reflux
    7. 6.6 Condensate Stabilizer Design
    8. 6.7 Trays and Packing
    9. 6.8 Condensate Stabilizer as a Gas-Processing Plant
    10. 6.9 Low Temperature Extractor (LTX) Unit as a Condensate Stabilizer
  13. Chapter Seven: Dehydration
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1 Overview
    3. 7.2 Adsorption
    4. 7.3 Absorption
    5. 7.4 Glycol Dehydration
    6. 7.5 System Design
    7. 7.6 Mercury Considerations
    8. 7.7 Special Glycol Dehydration Systems
    9. 7.8 Systems Utilizing Glycol-Gas Powered Pumps <span xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" class="italic">(Figure 7.59)</span>
    10. 7.9 Systems Utilizing Electricity-Driven Pumps
    11. 7.10 Nonregenerable Dehydrator
    12. 7.11 Physical Properties of Common Glycols
  14. Chapter Eight: Glycol Maintenance, Care, and Troubleshooting
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1 Preventive Maintenance
    3. 8.2 General Considerations
    4. 8.3 Eliminating Operating Problems
    5. 8.4 Improving Glycol Filtration
    6. 8.5 Use of Carbon Purification
  15. Chapter Nine: Gas Sweetening
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1 Processing Natural Gas
    3. 9.2 Acid Gas Considerations
    4. 9.3 Sweetening Processes
    5. 9.4 Solid Bed Processes
    6. 9.5 Chemical Solvent Processes
    7. 9.6 Physical Solvent Processes
    8. 9.7 Direct Conversion Processes
    9. 9.8 Distillation Process
    10. 9.9 Gas Permeation Process
  16. Chapter Ten: Gas Processing
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1 Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Recovery Considerations
    3. 10.2 Value of NGL Components
    4. 10.3 Gas Processing Terminology
    5. 10.4 Liquid Recovery Processes
    6. 10.5 Process Selection
    7. 10.6 Fractionation
    8. 10.7 Design Considerations
  17. Chapter Eleven: Safety Systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1 Basic Safety Concepts
    3. 11.2 Developing a Safe Process
    4. 11.3 API RP 14C
    5. 11.4 Safety Management Systems
    6. 11.5 Safety Case and Individual Risk Rate
    7. 11.6 Relief Valves and Relief Systems
    8. 11.7 Flare and Vent Disposal Systems
  18. Appendix A: Case Study: Membrane/Amine Hybrid Grissik Gas Plant [1–3], Sumatra, Indonesia
    1. A.1 Introduction
    2. A.2 Process Overview
    3. A.3 Background
    4. A.4 First Commissioning
    5. A.5 TSA Design and Performance
    6. A.6 TSA Process Description
    7. A.7 Reasons for Four Towers
    8. A.8 Cycle Times and Breakthrough
    9. A.9 Heat Recovery Between Cooling and Heating
    10. A.10 Air Liquide Medal membrane
    11. A.11 Membrane Performance
    12. A.12 Permeate/Acid Gas Utilization
    13. A.13 Amine System
  19. Appendix B: Case Study: The Judge Digby Gas Plant Hikes Production with Quick Solvent Change-Out [1]
    1. B.1 Judge Digby Plant
    2. B.2 Debottlenecking
    3. B.3 Preparing for the Conversion
    4. B.4 The Turnaround
    5. B.5 Plant Operations
    6. B.6 BTEX Emissions
  20. Index