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Supply Chain Management for Humanitarians

Book Description

Examines supply chain management in the context of humanitarian logistics, supported by international practitioner case studies and problem-based learning.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Praise for <span xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" class="normal">Supply Chain Management for Humanitarians</span>
  3. Title Page
  4. Contents
  5. PART ONE Logistics and supply chain management in the humanitarian context
    1. 1.1    Introduction
      1. Ira Haavisto, Gyöngyi Kovács and Karen M Spens, Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Research Institute (HUMLOG Institute), Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland
      2. Introduction
      3. What is so special about humanitarian logistics?
      4. Trade-offs in humanitarian logistics
      5. Strategic, tactical and operational levels
      6. Activities, phases and mandates
      7. Concluding remarks
      8. Notes
      9. References
    2. 1.2    Exploring logistics competences and capabilities in not-for-profit environments: the case of Médecins Sans Frontières
      1. Diego Vega, Neoma Business School and Cret-Log, France
      2. Introduction
      3. Literature review
      4. Research design
      5. Results
      6. Discussion and implications
      7. References
  6. PART TWO Setting up a supply chain network
    1. 2.1    Setting up a humanitarian supply network
      1. Graham Heaslip (HUMLOG Institute, Finland and Galway Mayo Institute of Technology, Ireland) and Gyöngyi Kovács (HUMLOG Institute)
      2. Introduction
      3. Local versus global considerations in humanitarian supply chains
      4. Anticipating, and preparing for, new risks
      5. Cash transfer programmes changing the logic of humanitarian supply chains
      6. Concluding remarks
      7. References
    2. 2.2    Service triad case study
      1. Graham Heaslip, HUMLOG Institute, Finland and Galway Mayo Institute of Technology, Ireland
      2. The buyer organization
      3. The service provider
      4. The end customer
      5. Findings
      6. References
    3. 2.3    Setting up a supply chain network in the Kenyan nutrition sector
      1. Tunca Tabaklar (HUMLOG Institute, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland) and Olivia Agutu (UNICEF Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya)
      2. Introduction
      3. Trade-offs in procurement decisions in setting up a supply chain network
      4. Kenyan nutrition supply chain
      5. Procurement activities
      6. Collaboration in the nutrition supply chain
      7. Sustainability and performance in the nutrition supply chain
      8. Concluding remarks
      9. Reference
  7. PART THREE Supply chain strategy
    1. 3.1    Supply chain strategy
      1. Ira Haavisto (HUMLOG Institute), Graham Heaslip (HUMLOG Institute and Galway Mayo Institute of Technology) and Paul D Larson (University of Manitoba, Canada)
      2. Introduction
      3. Supply chain strategies
      4. Humanitarian supply chain and performance
      5. Discussion – alignment of strategy
      6. References
    2. 3.2    Case study: partnerships – supply chain strategy
      1. Graham Heaslip, HUMLOG Institute and Galway Mayo Institute of Technology
      2. Case history Kosovo
      3. Case history Chad
      4. Outcome
      5. References
  8. PART FOUR Decision making in the supply chain
    1. 4.1    Decision making in humanitarian logistics
      1. Minchul Sohn (HUMLOG Institute, Finland), Eija Susanna Meriläinen (HUMLOG Institute, Finland) and David B Grant (HUMLOG Institute, Finland and Hull University Business School, UK)
      2. Introduction
      3. Cost-effective decision criteria in logistics and supply chain management
      4. Contextual specifics in humanitarian supply chains
      5. External structures
      6. Illustration of the facility location decisions
      7. A comprehensive decision-making model
      8. Conclusions
      9. References
    2. 4.2    Forecasts, financing and acceleration of humanitarian logistics: from supply chain to value chain
      1. Janot Mendler de Suarez, Pablo Suarez, Erin Coughlan de Perez and Dak Martin Doleagbenu, Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre, Netherlands
      2. The early warning–early action gap
      3. Forecast-based financing
      4. Togo’s FbF pilot project
      5. Full value proposition
      6. Conclusions
      7. References
  9. PART FIVE Procurement
    1. 5.1    Procurement in humanitarian supply chains
      1. Ala Pazirandeh, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
      2. An overview of procurement in the humanitarian sector
      3. Main challenges of procurement in humanitarian supply chains
      4. The procurement process and the humanitarian sector
      5. Procurement strategies and factors impacting their choice
      6. Procurement strategies for a better procurement power
      7. A closer look at co-operative procurement
      8. Co-ordination for successful co-operative purchasing
      9. Concluding remarks
      10. References
    2. 5.2    Joint tender for freight-forwarding services: promises and pitfalls
      1. Ala Pazirandeh (University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and Heidi Herlin (HUMLOG Institute, Finland)
      2. Initiation of the joint tender
      3. Profiles of involved agencies
      4. Profile of freight forwarders for the humanitarian agencies
      5. Reactions and expectations among the agencies
      6. Reactions and expectations among the freight forwarders
      7. The tender process
      8. Turbulence before the finish line
      9. Conclusions
      10. Notes
      11. References
    3. 5.3    A procurement project in the Philippines
      1. Jonas Stumpf (HELP Logistics – a programme of the Kuehne Foundation, Asia Office), Maximilian Foehse (HELP Logistics – a programme of the Kuehne Foundation, Asia Office) and Tom Godfrey (Save the Children, Asia Regional Office)
      2. Introduction
      3. Methodology of the procurement project
      4. Spend analysis
      5. Price-capturing mechanism
      6. Summary
      7. References
    4. 5.4    Partnerships and innovative procurement as enablers for sustainable development goals
      1. Rolando M Tomasini, Head of Global Outreach at the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS)
      2. Development agenda paradigm shift
      3. Partnerships risks
      4. Conclusion
      5. Notes
  10. PART SIX Transportation, fleet management, delivery and distribution
    1. 6.1    Transport in humanitarian supply chains
      1. Ruth Banomyong (Thammasat University, Thailand) and David B Grant (HUMLOG Institute, Finland and Hull University Business School, UK)
      2. Introduction
      3. The role of transport in humanitarian SCM
      4. The selection of carrier and modes choices in humanitarian supply chains
      5. A reference framework for transport in humanitarian supply chains
      6. Summary
      7. References
    2. 6.2    Humanitarian aid supply corridors: Europe–Iraq
      1. Anthony Beresford, Stephen Pettit and Ziad al Hashimi, Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University, UK
      2. Background
      3. The humanitarian crisis in Iraq
      4. Route choice and risk spreading
      5. Multimodal corridors from Germany to Baghdad
      6. Multimodal corridors from west Mediterranean to Baghdad
      7. Summary and conclusions
      8. References
  11. PART SEVEN Warehouse and inventory management
    1. 7.1    Warehousing in humanitarian logistics
      1. Alain Vaillancourt, Jönköping International Business School, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and HUMLOG Institute, Finland
      2. Warehousing in supply chains
      3. Assessing the warehouse needs
      4. Warehousing material handling equipment
      5. Warehouse layouts
      6. Inventory management processes
      7. Warehouse management systems and performance improvement
      8. Warehouse security and safety
      9. Conclusion
      10. Lessons learnt
      11. Reference
    2. 7.2    The ABC analysis
      1. Alain Vaillancourt, Jönköping International Business School, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and HUMLOG Institute, Finland
  12. PART EIGHT Information technology
    1. 8.1    Information systems for humanitarian logistics: concepts and design principles
      1. Tina Comes (Centre for Integrated Emergency Management, University of Agder, Norway) and Bartel Van de Walle (Policy Analysis Section, Department of Multi-Actor Systems, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands)
      2. Introduction
      3. Disaster management information systems
      4. Designing humanitarian logistics information systems
      5. Conclusions
      6. Notes
      7. References
    2. 8.2    GDACSmobile: an IT tool supporting assessments for humanitarian logistics
      1. Daniel Link (Chair for Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany) and Bernd Hellingrath (Chair for Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany)
      2. Introduction
      3. Main stakeholder groups
      4. Information flows
      5. Application case
      6. Conclusion
  13. PART NINE Sustainability, performance measurement, monitoring/evaluation and exit strategy
    1. 9.1    Logistics competency for humanitarian relief: the case of Médecins Sans Frontières
      1. Diego Vega, NEOMA Business School, France
      2. From l’intendance to logistics
      3. Logistics competency at MSF
      4. Competing through capabilities and competencies
      5. Ensuring performance through logistics
      6. Strategizing logistics of humanitarian organizations
      7. Notes
      8. References
    2. 9.2    Community-managed rural water supply in Ethiopia
      1. Linda Annala, HUMLOG Institute, Finland and Arto Suominen, Community-managed Accelerated WaSH in Ethiopia (COWASH) project
      2. Trade-offs
      3. Performance
      4. Sustainability
      5. Community
      6. Collaboration
      7. Hints for practitioners
      8. References
    3. 9.3    Managing supply chain sustainability risks
      1. Alexander Blecken, Anna Gaarde and Nives Costa, United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), Denmark
      2. Highlights
      3. Map procurement spend
      4. Evaluate sustainability risks
      5. Evaluate supplier leverage
      6. Prioritize and take action
      7. Pilot workshop
      8. Conclusions
      9. Hints for practitioners
    4. 9.4    Using three-dimensional printing in a humanitarian context: challenges and solutions
      1. Peter Tatham (Department of International Business and Asian Studies, Griffith University, Australia) and Jennifer Loy (Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, Australia)
      2. Introduction
      3. Key logistic trade-offs of 3DP
      4. 3D printing
      5. Moving from theory to practice
      6. Management of 3DP in a humanitarian context
      7. Summary
      8. Hints for practitioners
      9. References
    5. 9.5    Making performance measurement work in humanitarian logistics: the case of an IT-supported balanced scorecard
      1. Adam Widera (Chair for Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany) and Bernd Hellingrath (Chair for Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany)
      2. Introduction
      3. What to measure – the balanced scorecard approach
      4. Process-orientation
      5. Manageability of the PMS
      6. How to measure – the IT supported dashboard approach
      7. Lessons learnt
      8. Outlook
      9. References
    6. 9.6    Boko Haram: the security and supply chain management challenges of providing relief
      1. Richard Oloruntoba, University of Newcastle, Australia
      2. Introduction and background
      3. Logistical distribution challenges: scale and dispersion
      4. Security challenges to relief supply chains
      5. Challenges of finding reliable persons and organizations, and inadequate media coverage
      6. Existing relief operations and supply chains
      7. Framework for mitigating security challenges in relief operations and associated relief supply chains
      8. Summary and conclusions
      9. Key considerations for practitioners
      10. References
    7. 9.7    Measuring the supply chain performance of humanitarian organizations: the case of Thai Red Cross in Chiangmai
      1. Ruth Banomyong (Centre for Logistics Research, Thammasat Business School, Thammasat University, Thailand) and Paitoon Varadejsatitwong (TU-Kuehne HUMLOG Team, Thammasat Business School, Thammasat University, Thailand)
      2. Introduction
      3. Quick scan audit methodology (QSAM)
      4. Case study: Thai Red Cross Chiangmai Office
      5. References
  14. Index
  15. Copyright