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Successful Project Sponsorship

Book Description

This practical guide will show you how to take ownership of the role of project sponsor or project executive to ensure that your projects succeed in achieving tangible benefits for your organization and its stakeholders.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Contents
  4. List of figures
  5. List of tables
  6. About the author
  7. Preface
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Introduction
  10. PART ONE    Principles
  11. Introduction to Part 1: The four principles of successful project sponsorship
  12. 01  The first principle: share the business case
    1. It’s the business result that counts
    2. Focus
    3. Basis for communication
    4. One-liner
    5. Business case categories
    6. The business case is not a document
    7. How does a business case come about?
    8. Stage transitions and changes
    9. How is the business case maintained?
    10. Yardstick for success
    11. Benefits realization
    12. Summary
    13. Note
  13. 02  The second principle: organize ownership
    1. Business management is accountable for project success
    2. Individual contribution
    3. Complementary principles
    4. Stakeholder interaction
    5. The project sponsor: business case owner
    6. The steering group
    7. The senior user
    8. The senior supplier
    9. Link to line management accountabilities
    10. Behaviour
    11. Teamwork
    12. The steering group: small is beautiful
    13. Individual responsibilities
    14. Summary
    15. Notes
  14. 03  The third principle: focus on deliverables
    1. Go for the result
    2. Clear scope
    3. Examples of deliverables
    4. Ambiguous deliverables
    5. Projects with an unclear end deliverable
    6. Ghost deliverables
    7. Users are interested in deliverables, not in projects
    8. Ensuring quality
    9. Getting a grip on progress
    10. Getting a grip on cost
    11. Consistency
    12. Summary
    13. Note
  15. 04  The fourth principle: empower the project manager
    1. Balanced relationship
    2. The project manager’s responsibilities
    3. Commitment
    4. Management stages
    5. Management by exception
    6. Stage plan
    7. Reporting
    8. Fewer meetings?
    9. Check the business case
    10. Which management stages?
    11. Summary
    12. Note
    13. Summary of Part 1
  16. Part Two    Details
  17. Introduction to Part 2
  18. 05  A closer look at the steering group
    1. Who has to fulfil the project sponsor role?
    2. Who represents the users?
    3. Who represents the suppliers?
    4. Should an external supplier be a member of the steering group?
    5. Other roles
    6. Summary
  19. 06  Directing the project manager
    1. Who provides the project manager?
    2. How do you recognize a good project manager?
    3. How do you empower the project manager?
    4. How do you keep the project manager under control?
    5. How do you keep an external supplier’s project manager under control?
    6. Summary
    7. Notes
  20. 07  Realizing the benefits
    1. How do you create benefit ownership?
    2. How do you direct benefit realization?
    3. The motivating force of benefit management
    4. The advantages of benefit management
    5. Summary
    6. Notes
  21. 08  Achieving quality
    1. What is quality?
    2. What are key responsibilities regarding quality?
    3. What instruments does the steering group have to achieve quality?
    4. How do you engage users in realizing quality effectively and efficiently?
    5. Summary
  22. 09  Dealing with uncertainties
    1. How do you ensure that risks are properly managed?
    2. How do you deal with changes?
    3. Summary
    4. Note
  23. 10  Assessing documents
    1. How do you assess a business case document?
    2. How do you assess a plan?
    3. How do you assess a performance report?
    4. How do you assess a change request?
    5. Summary
    6. Note
  24. 11  Why do projects exceed their budget and what can you do about this?
    1. Optimism bias
    2. Increase in user insight
    3. Excessive specialist influence
    4. Changes in the project environment
    5. Insufficient project control
    6. Blind spots in the schedule
    7. Technical issues
    8. Parkinson’s law
    9. Decision-making delays
    10. Suppliers forcing up prices
    11. Summary
    12. Note
    13. Summary of Part 2
  25. Part Three    Advancing project sponsorship in organizations
  26. Introduction to Part 3
  27. 12  The challenge
    1. Conflicting interests
    2. Lower status of project management
    3. Performance measurement
    4. ‘The project manager is accountable’
    5. Business schools
    6. Project management literature
    7. Professional organizations
    8. Suppliers
    9. Project managers
    10. Summary
  28. 13  The approach
    1. Align with existing context
    2. Start where the momentum is
    3. Include all target groups
    4. Address several levels of personal change
    5. Improve benefit management
    6. Practise what you preach
    7. Work with authoritative trainers
    8. Continuous effort
    9. Summary
    10. Note
  29. 14  Tips for training courses and workshops
    1. Training the board of directors
    2. Training the project sponsors and steering group members
    3. Training the project managers
    4. Training the auditors
    5. Training the controllers
    6. Steering group start-up meetings
    7. Summary
    8. Notes
    9. Summary of Part 3
  30. Epilogue
  31. Appendix 1: PMBOK overview
  32. Appendix 2: PRINCE2 overview
  33. Appendix 3: Agile overview
  34. Appendix 4: Responsibilities and accountabilities
  35. Appendix 5: A note on the terminology used in this book
  36. Glossary
  37. References
  38. Index
  39. Copyright