You are previewing Structured Development for Real-Time Systems.
O'Reilly logo
Structured Development for Real-Time Systems

Book Description

In the first two volumes of Structured Development for Real Time Systems, authors Paul Ward and Stephen Mellor described a comprehensive modeling notation and a set of guidelines for using the notation to build an essential model. In this final volume, the guidelines are extended to encompass the building of an implementation model, and the notation is extended to include a hierarchical description of code organization.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
    1. Dedications
  2. Yourdon Computing Series: Ed Yourdon, Advisor
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. Preface
  5. Note on Preliminary Edition
  6. 1. Implementation Modeling Heuristics
    1. 1. Implementation Modeling Heuristics Overview
      1. 1.1. Introduction
      2. 1.2. Minimization of essential model distortion
      3. 1.3. Satisfactory approximation to essential model behavior
      4. 1.4. Top-down allocation to implementation technology
      5. 1.5. Classification of the essential model by use of implementation resources
      6. 1.6. Data abstraction from the essential model
      7. 1.7. Conflicts among heuristics
      8. 1.8. Summary
      9. Chapter 1: References
    2. 2. Identifying Implementation Constraints
      1. 2.1. Introduction
      2. 2.2. Implementation constraints versus resource availability
      3. 2.3. Environmental information required to determine constraints
      4. 2.4. Essential model transformations as sources of implementation constraints
      5. 2.5. Essential model data as a source of implementation constraints
      6. 2.6. Summary
  7. 2. Processor and Task Stage Heuristics
    1. 3. Processor Modeling
      1. 3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.2. Allocation criteria
      3. 3.3. Identification of processors
      4. 3.4. Allocation of the transformation model
      5. 3.5. Allocation of the stored data model
      6. 3.6. The mechanics of allocation
      7. 3.7. Completing the processor stage of the implementation model
      8. 3.8. Summary
    2. 4. Task Modeling
      1. 4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.2. The nature of tasks
      3. 4.3. Basic mechanics of task allocation
      4. 4.4. Allocation of continuous transformations
      5. 4.5. Allocation of discrete transformations
      6. 4.6. Summary
      7. Chapter 4: References
    3. 5. Interface Modeling
      1. 5.1. Introduction
      2. 5.2. Synchronization of data flow
      3. 5.3. Synchronization of access to stored data
      4. 5.4. Synchronization of control
      5. 5.5. Net flow of data and interfaces
      6. 5.6. Interface dialogue flow specification
      7. 5.7. Modeling control of dialogues
      8. 5.8. Use of services
      9. 5.9. Summary
      10. Chapter 5: References
    4. 6. Modeling System Services — Process Management
      1. 6.1. Introduction
      2. 6.2. Semantic levels
      3. 6.3. Essential models for system utilities
      4. 6.4. Types of system utilities
      5. 6.5. Cross references between application and utility models
      6. 6.6. System utilities in a multi-project environment
      7. 6.7. Summary
      8. Chapter 6: References
    5. 7. Modeling System Services — Data Management
      1. 7.1. Introduction
      2. 7.2. Stored data management technology
      3. 7.3. Data independence and binding
      4. 7.4. Organization of data
      5. 7.5. Advantages of an external relational view
      6. 7.6. Run-time database manipulation operations
      7. 7.7. Constructing relational tables in primary memory
      8. 7.8. Speeding access to stored data
      9. 7.9. Distributed databases
      10. 7.10. Summary
      11. Chapter 7: References
  8. 3. Module Stage Tools and Heuristics
    1. 8. Modeling Hierarchy
      1. 8.1. Introduction
      2. 8.2. The structure chart
      3. 8.3. The module specification
      4. 8.4. The data specification
      5. 8.5. Summary
      6. Chapter 8: References
    2. 9. Translating Networks into Hierarchies
      1. 9.1. Introduction
      2. 9.2. Finding the top of the hierarchy
      3. 9.3. Translating transformation schemas with control transformations
      4. 9.4. Module-level transformation schemas
      5. 9.5. Transform analysis
      6. 9.6. Transaction analysis
      7. 9.7. Summary
      8. Chapter 9: References
    3. 10. Structure Chart Refinement
      1. 10.1. Introduction
      2. 10.2. Coupling
      3. 10.3. Module cohesion
      4. 10.4. Module complexity
      5. 10.5. Module reusability
      6. 10.6. Summary
      7. Chapter 10: References
  9. 4. Before and Beyond the Implementation Model
    1. 11. Sizing, Efficiency, and Optimization
      1. 11.1. Introduction
      2. 11.2. Identifying resource usage
      3. 11.3. Estimates and reality
      4. 11.4. Optimization techniques
      5. 11.5. Summary
    2. 12. Implementation Model Traceability
      1. 12.1. Introduction
      2. 12.2. Tracing implementation model components
      3. 12.3. Tracing for system services
      4. 12.4. Summary
  10. A. Cruise Control System
    1. Implementation Resources
    2. Transformation Schemas
    3. Data Dictionary
    4. Transformation Specifications
  11. B. Bottle Filling System
    1. Implementation Resources Background
    2. Transformation Schemas and Structure Charts
    3. Data Dictionary
  12. C. SILLY System (Science and Industry Little Logic Yzer)
    1. Implementation Resources
    2. Transformation Schemas and Structure Charts
    3. Data Dictionary
    4. Transformation Specifications
  13. D. Defect Inspection System
    1. Implementation Resources
    2. Schematic Diagrams
    3. Data Dictionary